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Showing content with the highest reputation on 15/02/21 in all areas

  1. wimpus

    Spitfire, snow and frost...

    As I used my Spitfire as daily and it started to snow and freeze very good this week... She did it well. Only very hard to start after standing a day in -5°c ! Mornings after standing in a non heated garage, she does it pretty good. Today took some pics in the snow (got a bit stuck.. ) as it was 'International Drive Your Triumph Day' . After that noticed the carwash was open... time to clean off the salt. Incl cleaning floor edge, rear of chassis/suspension, boot floor etc etc. (People did look a bit strange sitting on my knees washing the Spitfire :D)
    2 points
  2. Hello All, Spent a very entertaining couple of hours yesterday afternoon removing the front suspension crossmember on my Sunbeam Alpine, as part of my car's body restoration. With the current restrictions (plus the fact I'm a Billy no mates), I had to tackle the job on my own, although I imagine that most classic owners out there are in the same boat at the moment.The removal of the suspension crossmember on an Alpine is a straightforward job when the car is already stripped down, with the engine, trans and steering all removed. There are only 4 bolts securing the crossmember to the front chassis legs, and these are accessed from below via holes in the lower wishbones. I needed to jack the car up first and support the front of the chassis on axle stands with wood blocks to spread the load, removed the front wheels, then prepped for the job by applying penetrating oil to the wells on the top of the front chassis legs where the front crossmember bolts emerge, the rear ones are inaccessible, so you just have to trust that torque will do the job for those. Tools required were a socket, extension bar, breaker bar with UJ, a length of pipe (I used a 3 foot length of thick wall steel pipe), and a low wheeled trolley. The front suspension and crossmember is a heavy unit, so I supported the weight with an engine hoist, and positioned the wheeled trolley below it. With the weight supported you can then undo the 4 bolts, and take my word for it I really needed that length of pipe to apply the required torque to get those bolts out!! One in particular finally went with a crack like a rifle shot, it was that tight. With the bolts out I lowered the crossmember with the engine hoist onto the trolley, and pulled it out forward. It was then that I noticed something drop out of the N/S suspension..........picture attached!! It looks like it originated in a sheep..........and I think it's fair to say that it's been up there for quite some time!!I've found plenty of assorted ephemera in surprising places in cars over the years, but this has to rate as the most unexpected!!Ian
    1 point
  3. Is it just me or has it been a bit cold of late? The last two weekends in the garage haven't been particularly productive, as I generally find it useful to be able to feel my fingers when performing manual tasks! I did try running the heater in the garage, but I can't have a heater and weld, as I also need the air compressor to cool the welds, and the combination of all three blows the fuse to the garage! So freezing it was, with regular trips into the house to defrost and imbibe steaming mugs of tea. So last weekend I only managed a couple hours in the garage, which apart from trying to keep warm was composed predominantly of cleaning up the welds around the seatbelt mounting point, so not very exciting, hence no picks. With that done though, I was able to swing the tub around and start work on the driver's side, starting with the door step. Based on my experience with the passenger, I was a bit more organized this time, and started by grinding out the spot welds on the front edge, rather than just blindly setting about it with an angle grinder like I did last time. A quick tap with a wood chisel, and I was able to peel the front edge back. Urghhh! Not pretty, but par for the course. Next up was drilling out all of the spot welds on the rear edge of the panel. A bit blurry but you get the idea. These just needed a fairly gentle tap with a wood chisel, and off the panel popped, with just a little twisting required. Looks OK from this side, not so much from the other. The new panel is sitting ready to go, but first I need to clean up the section of the floor pan that is staying. Somewhat crusty but intact, this then received the tender ministrations of the angle grinder and wire brush combo, leaving me with nice step area ready for a coat of rust stopper, which was duly applied. It was still a bit parky when I packed up yesterday, but with this week's balmy weather, I'm looking forward to applying a coat of zinc primer during the week, and getting the new step welded on next weekend. Karl
    1 point
  4. Some people will have a Brazilian buttock lift, but that seems a bit excessive.
    1 point
  5. I'm reading these posts and if you are of a certain mindset it reads like a thread from one of Doug's infamous 'other' sites😂 Perhaps I'm punch drunk 'cos I've just booked my jab for this Wednesday...... Yay! Iain PS, I used some vacuum hose from Halfords. Fits and works fine.
    1 point
  6. We fall into the trap of thinking that because we know about cars, others do too. There is about 80% of the population out there who know little and care less, as long as someone else gets all the bother of replacing the nasty dirty parts.
    1 point
  7. Have you ever tried dealing with a well known double-glazing company? (The one I'm thinking of had a policy of dissing their competitors first, then quoting a figure and immediately offering a 50% discount, andanother discount, and another discount.... By the time they'd wasted hours of my time and come down to 1/8 of the initial quote it must surely have been a bargain! Except that I had already contacted a small, local firm, who spent ten minutes measuring up, one minute telling me the price - less than that major national one's final offer! - and then left, to let me think about it.)
    1 point
  8. Mjit

    Spitfire, snow and frost...

    The heated garage might save you from this but, having driven a Spitfire as a daily driver you might want to take the hard top OFF if daytime temps. are sub-zero. I well remember a winter spent with twice daily (no garage) drives that went: Scrape ice of outside of glass. Sit on cold, hard seat and scrape ice of inside of glass. Start driving with heater on, waiting for the heat to come. Brief window of comfort and visibility when it does and the warm air blows up the screen absorbing the moisture. Cold, hard seat transforms into still cold but softer, wetter seat as bum-heat melts the water that's been absorbed into the seat foam and frozen. Top of head starts to get cold and wet as the moisture absorbed and pushed up the screen by the demister that then condensed on the cold steel of the hardtop and had frozen starts to thaw out and drip. Park car outside, either at home or at work and let nature re-freeze everything that had thawed. Repeat. It IS fun to find a nice side, empty piece of snow covered road and provoke the rear end into breaking away (at low speeds) though
    1 point
  9. well I'm getting a deal with my local independent and him and his fitter say 165 70 will be fine on the 3.5J So I'll hold them to it £165 is the price too. Pity it's not the 70
    1 point
  10. poppyman

    Joke

    1 point
  11. Colin Lindsay

    filler cap

    Don't ask how I know.
    0 points
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