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Showing content with the highest reputation on 17/10/21 in all areas

  1. Well, it's been a busy two weeks or so since I was last on the forum; I disappeared off to recharge the mental batteries and get some things done, which include insulating a roofspace, sanding a ceiling and trimming bushes! There was also some fairly intensive work on the Herald 13/60 for an impending MOT - over here we test in Government Test Centres and the waiting list is almost three months. Add to that the fact that this Herald has been prohibited from use on the public road until repaired and retested, so this would be the first drive in the Herald since purchase. I rebuilt the brakes and bearings, but the brakes were still amazingly spongy. It may be down to the fact that they have not been bedded in - in the hopes of a quick settling-down I had already binned the terrible EBC Greenstuff pads and fitted NOS brake pads from the shelf. The system was again rebled, still poor, and a quick inspection of the rebuilt caliper revealed traces of brake fluid dripping down... Thankfully it turned out that it was just spilt fluid from the bleed process. The brakes are as good as can be; I suspect the master cylinder is worn or an incorrect size , due to the length of pedal travel - it's the extension version for drum to disc conversion using type 12 calipers, and these are 14s - and a new one is ready for fitting. I also have to remake new pipes to overcome the somewhat imaginative routing by the previous owners. The biggest problem was the rich running; the smell of burning oil from the engine is intense. The car started from cold with no choke. I simply could not strike a balance between a good idle speed and a stalled engine. My first action was to replace the carb with a spare - this made no difference whatsoever and in fact would not run properly at all; the fault was traced to serious wear on the replacement carb which might as well be binned. Next job was to strip down the original carb, and the state of the diaphragm was amazing. This one had been trapped between the two body halves... The carb itself was black with deposits and full of gritty debris. All was stripped down, jets removed and cleaned. A new diaphragm fitted, the piston would not seat, and close examination revealed a bent needle. This was also replaced, but the engine still ran very rich. The fact that the car was idling for long periods did not help, so I sneaked it out on the road in the dark, and drove 300 yards to a nearby Demense with a cloud of smoke so dense it showed in the rear lights. I met one car, a Range Rover, who blinded me with his full beam in revenge... mine are too high, I think, and one of the reasons for the MOT failure in 2019. It also felt very wandery, and the brakes were very soft. Back to the garage... the new sparkplugs looked like afro hairstyles. Very very sooty. This time I replaced the jets, but again it made no difference. However, I was not sure of the spare carb from which the jets had been taken - it was a very clean, almost unused version, but something still niggled. I dug out an old 13/60 carb and took the jets from that, removed the carb from the car once again, and assembled it on the bench. This time I set the mixture off the car, turning down 2.5 turns instead of the recommended three. Back on the car, it started with the choke, and died when the choke was pushed back in... looking good so far. Unfortunately the PO has fitted an incorrect choke cable on which the outer cable was too short and he had added a length of rubber tubing, so I decided to risk the cable with an unclamped outer and manually set it at the carb. I tuned the idle by ear and it seemed alright... Next job was to align the headlamps. which were so far off they signalled to passing aircraft. It was quite a difficult job to align them as the adjusters were all stuck or painted over, but eventually with the aid of my garage door I set them to low and left. They'll have to do. Following the discovery of sooty black water dripping on the garage floor I reckoned the silencer was defunct, but could find no holes in it... however take no chances. I pinched this new one off the red convertible and it certainly looks better, although no quieter. Back on the bench I found that the old one had split along the seam, so there was the fault - invisible from below. While it was up there I readjusted the rear brakes, in the vain hope of improving them. After that there was nothing to do but wait for Saturday afternoon. I don't think we'll pass but at least I'll know what else needs doing. SATURDAY AFTERNOON.... The first legal drive in the Herald - on the way to a pre-booked test. I wanted to go with the top down, so the weather was dry but cold. In fact it was Baltic. The Herald started well enough, and ran well, and once the choke was pushed back in we set off for the fourteen miles to the Test Centre along quiet roads - deliberately, to avoid any embarrassment of breakdowns or clouds of smoke. Amazingly, there wasn't any, although I was paranoid for the entire journey. Pulled well, accelerated well, ran quietly.... amazing. At one point I smelled smoke but it was only a farmer burning hedges. I braked repeatedly; every few hundred yards I stood on the brakes. No idea if it did anything at all but we did slow to a stop. At the Test Centre they took the Herald off me, into the test bay, and closed the doors. Due to Covid I have to remain outside. My parting desperately hopeful shot to the tester was: "Stand on the brakes, there's no servo in these..." Twenty minutes later they drove back out again and parked in the car park in front of all the other drivers waiting on their cars. Embarrassment... "There's a problem" announces the tester. "Can you confirm your address?" I did. "The printer's gone down. We can't print the Certificate so we'll post it out." It passed. No minors, no advisories, a full pass and no Prohibition any more. We're fully legal. I drove home in the freezing cold, 60 mph, hardly a car on the roads, it started to rain, the wipers were terrible, and I fell in love with Heralds all over again.
    1 point
  2. Would the camping mat foam which is a closed cell waterproof type product work?
    1 point
  3. Check out the cheap yoga mats in various outlets, including Tescos; they come in a range of thicknesses, are usually rubbery / foam waterproof stuff, and can be cut to shape quite easily. You can make a lot of gaskets from just one.
    1 point
  4. I re-fabricated some end fitting`s from scraps of Galvanized strip steel I had, took about 15 min each.👍 I had some 1/4" steel rivets which cut down to make nice pins too. The split pins come from stock. I know they are not that expensive to buy, But the Postage is more than the part(s) cost.! how do they justify that?. Starting to look the business though. Pete
    1 point
  5. Mathew

    That was a year that was..

    Good progress. Wish i had remembered my spring compressors! You know where they are if you need them.
    1 point
  6. Bfg

    That was a year that was..

    Back on the job., albeit slowly..well even more slowly than usual ! Yesterday, while the car was still unmoved, on the ground, and level I checked the front wheels were straight (tight cord again) and checked the ride height and camber of the front suspension. the check was both from the wheel centre to the arch and again under the chassis. I did this three times with no weight in the car, the 68kg in either seat, and then finally with the 104kg in the driver's seat only. Bottom line is that the LHS is 10mm high (as the rear LHS was previously) but otherwise the camber on either wheel was good to go. Sometime in the future I'll borrow a spring compressor and swap out the coli spring collars on the LHS but otherwise leave it as it is. Final job on the suspension then (..for the time being) was to lift the car back onto the ramps, load it up again with the bricks so that I might tighten the trailing-arm / poly-bush bolts up underneath. While at it to check the tightness of the half shafts and the flexi-brake pipes, etc.. Moving on. . , there were a number of jobs that needed addressing under the car. . . Firstly to grease the half shaft UJ's and the rear propshaft UJ. The first grease nipple was snapped off. I was very fortunate though insomuch as I managed to undo the broken off piece without dismantling again, by poking an Allen key in and turning it out with that. I swapped it out with one from the half-shaft I'd previously replaced. Although it (the grease nipple) had a slight kink in it - I presumed that was to provide a better angle for greasing. But no It had been bent.. and so as I pinched that one up, it too sheered off level with the surface. An Allen key didn't work on that one, but by chance I had a Torx key which did the job. With that removed I found one more grease nipple in the yet to be replaced half-shaft. Job done. Two pumps of grease and the gun was empty ! Hey ho., of five UJ's, I managed to grease the two closer-to-the-diff ones and the rear of the prop-shaft. One outer UJ had no provision for greasing (sealed to destruction) and the other had a grease nipple that was impossible to get at, unless I removed the half shaft again.! For the time being I've left it. I'll need to pull that half shaft out again anyway. ^ Why did it have to be the one tucked up behind the exhaust pipe ? ..just a two minute job huh ! ? ^ second grease nipple. On the right of these photo is the correct long straight type of nipple with small spanner flats ..borrowed from the spare half-shaft. Other jobs while down under . . . The brake pipe on one side would have been squashed under the bump stop, so that had to be moved aside a little. The brake and the fuel pipe were only loosely secured by a cable tie ..where they went into the rear of the tunnel, and the fuel pipe's run would have also chafed on the chassis. The cupronickel pipe was also buckled and I'm sure with vibration it would soon have cracked, so I'll want to replace it. In the meantime, they needed 'adjusting', securing and preventing from chattering against each other or the chassis. ^^ Note on the RHS of the second photo how the exhaust pipe is resting against the chassis gusset, and the way the underside T-shirt panel is buckled up in the middle. The brake and fuel pipes further forward were clipped but still loose enough to rattle against each other &/or the chassis. I've locally rubber sleeved and neoprene padded behind the pipes as necessary. The hard fuel pipe is joined at that corner with a short length of flexi rubber hose, with no ethanol-resistant markings on it and no pipe clips. I'll want to correct this sooner rather than later. And yes there is a drip of fluid from the slave cylinder, which I'd asked to be done. The LHS sill repair is not pretty ..more on that in a future post. I've taped over the holes in the side of the chassis rails (white PVC tape) to lessen water ingress. Those in the bottom are being left open for drainage. The chassis' underside T-shirt plate being pulled straight The cross-box silencer mounts were adjusted (re-done), to raise it up and better support one side (..one bracket now surplus) The exhaust bracket and clamp under the gearbox was 'adjusted' (..also a clamp now surplus ..the car is getting lighter by the hour !). A clamp was fitted at the front of the pipe (where it joins the double down-pipes) as that was missing. The second of those clamps is also missing and the old one is bent so I need to buy another. ^ when all was said and done the pipe and silence are now secure ..and there's 1/4" clearance at its tightest spot. You'll note in the top RH corner the brake pipe was very close to the exhaust. That too has been adjusted. While under I was also spotting the oil drips from the recently rebuilt gearbox (which was 99.5% oil tight beforehand).. ^ This does not please me. So., progress is being made, but its slow because of my own post-op limitations and the fact that working under a car on 8" ramps is itself a slow business. All so many details though will simply take some time to work through. And there are many more yet. Pending the weather, more next week, perhaps, Bidding you all a good weekend, Pete
    1 point
  7. Don't forget to put the nut on (the correct way around) before you make the flare. A bit like wiring up a rubber plug and then remembering you should have fitted the cover onto the cable (the right way around) before tightening the connections and cable grip.
    1 point
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