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car fires


daverclasper
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Got to be electrical on older cars due to the lack of fuses. I saw the wire from the ignition to dizzy melt in front of me on my car some years back (see pic), I now have several fuse boxes and all circuits are protected. Someone like http://www.autosparks.co.uk/ sell everything you'd need, and it would definitely reduce the risk of your pride & joys going up in smoke. 

 

melted_wire.jpg

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My old herald had a small engine bay fire, wife driving, kids in the the back (5 and 3 at the time) but luckily somebody stopped with an extinguisher...

 

That was caused by an alternator fault, at least it appeared to be from my investigations. And you do not fuse an alternator (at least not in older cars)

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Leaking carbs increase the risk. I bought a new electrical petrol pump that turned out to deliver a much higher pressure than stated by the supplier. The result was flooding carbs, with lots of fuel drown on the exhaust manifold and garage floor. Check your carbs and hoses for leakage, replace old and cracked hoses. Having an extinguisher both in the car and in your garage is also a good idea.

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Counter intuitively, brake fluid is far more likely to catch fire than petrol when dripped on hot exhaust.

 

Also agree with more fuses and relays, I'm in the process of doing my car. The head lights on a GT6 have NO fuse and ALL the current goes through the dashboard switch.

 

I bought one of theses at a ridiculously cheap price from China and it is fit for purpose.

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/H4-9003-Headlight-Booster-Wire-Harness-Connector-Relay-Fuse-Socket-/390938014554?hash=item5b05b8b35a

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Another argument for using silicone brake fluid,I have used it for years in my Vitesse. In the process of upgrading the headlight wiring with heavier wire, fuses, relays and ceramic headlight sockets.

Checked the voltage drop before I started and was surprised how large it is.

 

Regards

 

Paul

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Another argument for using silicone brake fluid,I have used it for years in my Vitesse. 

Paul

I've tried to find silicone petrol but to no avail.... :)

My GT6 was dripping petrol onto the manifold last week which gave me a few heartstopping moments, but thankfully no fire. Overheating electrical cables would be my first worry, followed by sticking brakes that glow alarmingly red when sufficiently hot...

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 I had fitted a new stainless fuel tank. to a Scimitar I had in the 70's.

Returning  home  from putting the 20 galls needed to fill it, I noticed a steady stream of petrol coming from under the car.It was very obvious

 that I had not fitted the cork gasket properly  where the  tank sender unit is fitted into the tank

Moments later, with the car on ramps I was  frantically  trying to re-position the sender unit joint to  save the precious  fluid  which  was now  running down my arm and forming a large  pool under my shoulder and beginning to soak my shirt.

The approaching  voice of my neighbour caused me to panic.Derek was an very  amiable  alcoholic but  he  invariably had a fag dangling from between his fingers  (as per the compere on the Wheel Tappers and Shunters Club)

Ignoring my shout of " For Christ's sake, keep back!" he bent unsteadily down to peer under the car with a silly  puzzled grin and ,sure enough  there was the glowing  ciggie  now  dropping  fag ash into the petrol pool.

Luckily nothing happened but I have never moved so fast as when I got from under that car and ran to distance myself from him! 

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