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Pete Lewis
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The photo reminds me of a visit from my parents, many years ago, to us in Normandy. We decided to take them down to Tour and visit some chateaux and Leonardo de Vinci's place.

As we arrived in Tour there were banners on several lampposts and HUGE posters for an anti aids campaign. The slogan was 'F**k aids'. While I and my wife pretended not to have seen them my mum eventually simply said "did that say what I thought it said?" 🙄

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6 hours ago, Anglefire said:

The variant from Brazil is called that because it was first found there - but its not known (AFAIK) where it first appeared.

Yep, virus strains are traditionally given colloquial names based on where they were first identified and categorised as being unique, not where they may first have occured.  The 1918 'Spanish' flu probably originated in either the UK or France, but was first identified in Spain - simply because they weren't fighting in WW1 so had the time to go "There's a lot of people dying from the flu this year. Cough on this, José and let me shove it under the microscope...".

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Try this for history repeating itself:

"In 1993, Claude Hannoun, the leading expert on the Spanish flu at the Pasteur Institute, asserted the precursor virus was likely to have come from China and then mutated in the United States near Boston and from there spread to Brest, France, Europe's battlefields, the rest of Europe, and the rest of the world, with Allied soldiers and sailors as the main disseminators.[70] Hannoun considered several alternative hypotheses of origin, such as Spain, Kansas, and Brest, as being possible, but not likely.[70] In 2014, historian Mark Humphries argued that the mobilization of 96,000 Chinese laborers to work behind the British and French lines might have been the source of the pandemic. Humphries, of the Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John's, based his conclusions on newly unearthed records. He found archival evidence that a respiratory illness that struck northern China (where the laborers came from) in November 1917 was identified a year later by Chinese health officials as identical to the Spanish flu."

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