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Pete Lewis
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3 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

with a hand brake!

best brake on my cart was when a back wheel ran over my new school mac 

mum was not impressed but we made one out of carpet that flopped in front of the wheel 

must find a photo of our 24hr pedal car races ,

Pete

 

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18 minutes ago, JohnD said:

Ah! L'Anglais avec sa merde habituelle!

Good to see such excellent French grammar.  Merde is indeed a feminine noun! 

Checking out bad words at the back of the O level French class some decades ago wasn't time wasted.

Nigel

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3 hours ago, Paul H said:

I wish I had test driven before buying 

4887387F-24C6-4EC1-838B-BE7E235E8124.jpeg.33ecd7d92598b02b61ba15e310d60fa9.jpeg

That's my brother getting into my passenger seat, he is slightly heavier than me, however head height is the problem in a GT6 not bulk.

db

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15 hours ago, Nigel Clark said:

Good to see such excellent French grammar.  Merde is indeed a feminine noun! 

Checking out bad words at the back of the O level French class some decades ago wasn't time wasted.

Nigel

C’est vraiment gentil de votre part, Nigel!      My school French didn't get much past Armand and his horrid little friends.        But my favourite TV recently has been "Spiral", AKA "Engrenages", the vaguely Parisian  police procedural series.       Their French is quick, slangy and foul-mouthed, and I love it, even if I pick up one word in ten.      It has just fininished the final series that will be made as Laure and Gilou walk off into the sunset, finally drummed out of the cops for their off-the-book methods, but the whole programme, all eight series, is available on the iPlayer.     Suffer with Laure, detest Gilou when you don't admire him, sympathise with Tintin, admire the wily Juge d'Instruction Roban,  lust for the gorgeous but duplicitous Mlle. Karlsson!  Recoil at the truly revolting crimes that they must investigate!  Dock Green, this is not! 

 En vraiment, l'enfer, c'est les autres!

JOhn

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I love the films of Bertrand Tavernier, particularly L627 and Captaine Conan, but cannot understand the majority of it without subtitles. I thought I was getting better so purchased a copy of Oliver Guignard's 'Clemenceau' which has no subtitles, and cannot follow the dialogue at all. It's got no resemblance to O-level French... :(

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1 hour ago, JohnD said:

   Their French is quick, slangy and foul-mouthed, and I love it, even if I pick up one word in ten.     

 En vraiment, l'enfer, c'est les autres!

JOhn

La langue de Molière! Vif, coloré, plein des nuances subtile et délicate, pas comme celui de Shakespeare . . .:rolleyes:

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bureaucrats.jpg.4e057b792a2c310f297e752d7f223976.jpg

Having just tried and failed to file my self assessment tax return on-line for the first time - I could not agree more.

I don't know if there is a 'syndrome' to describe the equivalent of road rage when filling in forms on line ..but I have it. 

I cannot abide bureaucratic procedures at the best of times,  but trying to fill in their forms on a computer is I think not for me.  It does I fear take me over the edge and makes me very volatile.   I even loathe the spelling of the word 'bureaucrat'.  Now that we're out of Europe can we start again with spelling 

. . . something like the Americans have . . .

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5 hours ago, Chris A said:

La langue de Molière! Vif, coloré, plein des nuances subtile et délicate, pas comme celui de Shakespeare . . .:rolleyes:

But with many times fewer words than that pilfering, vocabulary-picking, ever-ductile and neological English!

 Le Dictionnaire de l'Académie française Ninth Edition  will contain about 60,000 words, while the Oxford Dictionary has 273,000.

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Is it not a strange thing?. That large tranches of the world despise the English, but it is still one of the most spoken languages internationally?. And The UK is the one place that 90% of those "displaced" and/or economically disadvantaged STILL try to migrate to. Legally or illegally.

Pete

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4 minutes ago, PeteH said:

Is it not a strange thing?. That large tranches of the world despise the English, but it is still one of the most spoken languages internationally?. And The UK is the one place that 90% of those "displaced" and/or economically disadvantaged STILL try to migrate to. Legally or illegally.

Pete

It's because we ponder to them and the loony left  pc brigade, where as other countries don't. People in this country are afraid to fly our own flag for fear of being branded "racist"

Alf 

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2 hours ago, JohnD said:

 

 Le Dictionnaire de l'Académie française Ninth Edition  will contain about 60,000 words, while the Oxford Dictionary has 273,000.

That's because you beat about the bush and don't get to the point 😁

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2 hours ago, PeteH said:

Is it not a strange thing?. That large tranches of the world despise the English, but it is still one of the most spoken languages internationally

Pete

At an international level I would bet it is the American version.

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16 minutes ago, Chris A said:

At an international level I would bet it is the American version.

One of my pet hates; "Do you speak American?"

No, I speak proper English. To me a phrase like Yo Ho is what a pirate says, not what some guy says to his girlfriend.

Anyone watch that Snoop Dog 'Just Eat' advert? At the end where he refers to his Fri Ri I want to slap him repeatedly whilst explaining: IT'S FRIED RICE! GOT IT? :)

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Two countries divided by a common language.

American English has kept some very old English whereas British English has moved on, at the same time the Americans have done weird things, using adverbs as nouns. Where the heck did 'Woke' come from that is used as a description?

Things went down hill once Latin stopped being 'the' language. 

 

 

 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Chris A said:

Two countries divided by a common language.

American English has kept some very old English whereas British English has moved on, at the same time the Americans have done weird things, using adverbs as nouns. Where the heck did 'Woke' come from that is used as a description?

Things went down hill once Latin stopped being 'the' language. 

 

 

 

 

 

How i wish someone put the damn  "Woke" brigade back to sleep..... Permanently!!!!

Tony. 

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And since when did people "pass"? Died. Yes. Passed? WTF is that about? Passed away is boarderline acceptable but passed or passing? No. not in my book. Its like people won't accept that someone has died. Like its less final. 

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