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GT6 End Float


Adrian
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Hello all

 

I've read many threads on this subject and I just wanted to clarify my understanding of exactly what it is.  I am using the Jigsaw CV conversion pictured below. I have new bearings etc but the ones on are sound so I think I'll leave them on. 

 

The parts diagrams show the splined driveshaft with a 148850 (spacer) and (149865) stoneguard / oil flinger onto the rear of the spline. I'm assuming that these two elements are integral to the Jigsaw unit and effectively from a backstop to the inner bearing seal?

 

So if I slide on the vertical link, the inner bearings would sit against the spacer (at least once tightened up).  The outer hub slides onto the splined driveshaft sandwiching the bearings and if I understand correctly this is the critical element of end float. In order to tighten the assembly to the required torque WITHOUT over compressing the bearings to the required 0.002 tolerance the shims are required to ensure the inner drive shaft assembly is just slightly wider than the vertical link assembly to allow free rotation.

 

A good photo and explanation of the Canley method I found posted by 'Cookie' shows the measuring of the endfloat against a straight edge across the top of the bearing and measuring the free space between the beating and the inner shaft face.  My main uncertainty is if I offer up the assembly and measure the float (If I am correct this has to be done unloaded) once tightened this float could be compressed and disappear so is it a case of try, try, try again until there is negligible play which seems to fly in the face of the accurate measurement. I don't have a DTI Gauge.

 

Also I was surprised that the old drive shaft nut was not particularly tight when I stripped it down!

 

Thanks

 

Adrian

 

post-1605-0-58157100-1456829469_thumb.jpgpost-1605-0-42681900-1456829698_thumb.jpg

 

 

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You need to measure the end float with the assembly tightened up with an ungreased bearing, not unloaded. If you have no DTI, look for very slight play, if there is no play it's too tight and you need additional or thicker shims. Once you've got the end float right strip the assembly down again and grease the bearing.

 

The nut should have been very tight, if it's loose then the nut probably hadn't locked. There is an issue in that most of the nuts available nowadays are too thick (The originals were special nylocks thinner than standard) and the locking part of the nylock won't lock properly as the end of the thread on the shaft tapers slightly. To avoid the issue of thinner nuts just use locktite to lock the nut.

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Thanks Andy

 

That's what I thought- Unfortunately I'm wrestling with the drivers side vertical link. I'm no expert but I'd say it was close to original and hasn't had a lot of attention other than previous owners slapping on paint. Had to cut the trunnion bolt - took it to the local garage as I couldn't shift it and they had no luck either so I'm left with trying to drill it out or but another one. The shock bolt is totally seized as well (but i'll leave that as the bracket seems to be difficult to come by). I shattered by bench vice attempting to remove a bush. So whilst painful and costly I think it will be worthwhile in the long run.

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  • 1 month later...

You need to measure the end float with the assembly tightened up with an ungreased bearing, not unloaded. If you have no DTI, look for very slight play, if there is no play it's too tight and you need additional or thicker shims. Once you've got the end float right strip the assembly down again and grease the bearing.

 

The nut should have been very tight, if it's loose then the nut probably hadn't locked. There is an issue in that most of the nuts available nowadays are too thick (The originals were special nylocks thinner than standard) and the locking part of the nylock won't lock properly as the end of the thread on the shaft tapers slightly. To avoid the issue of thinner nuts just use locktite to lock the nut.

we ought to have a group run thru or you tube video of this procedure , i'm sure its very easy but there are always questions about it and its always easier to do once you've been shown the correct way ...

 

paul

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