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damn lawn mower


Unkel Kunkel
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So, new mower with Briggs engine OHV Starts inredibly easily.Brilliant

Put way for the winter

Forgot to drain fuel -yes I know ,I know...

fuel gummed up filter  fromm tank and carb bowl full of sticky crud and corrosion

dismantled and  cleaned everything: blow out everything with compressed air.

Clean spark plug.

Starts ok runs fine all afternoon

Then splutters, back fires and back fires through carb. reluctant to start  when it does runs fine for 1/4 hr  then sputter bang bang futt futt futt futt won't rev splutter stalls .Won't start.

Starts  on Easy start runs for a while then repeats performance.

Off comes the carb for the fourth time and repeat  cleaning  check manifold gasket etc., out comes the spark plug to be cleaned for the nth time.

Now starts but will only run slowly with some choke- then revs fine for a brief while  then splutter bang splutter and   stalls.

Plug looks sl sooty and wet .Cleaned again.Good spark noted.

 

Scratch head again.

For want of something better to do put colortune on

Miracle ! -Starts instantly and runs besutifully with blue flame.

So decide   the (practically new ) spark plug  must be at fault .Examineagain  in detail -looks pristine and get a spark from gap when spinning engine over.

Decide change plug .Six quid small price for one's sanity...

= Starts instantly and runs all day =absolutely fine

Moral of the  very long story is don't underestimated the effect of a dodgy (almost new) spark plug.

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Ah, Atco - the oily green paint, the chipped gold lettering, the multiple yanks on the starter cord, the (eventual) "put put" - the very smell of summer...

 

Which is why I bought a Honda!

 

Steve C

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Aquired a two stroke strimmer , belt driven horizontal only on pair of wheels

Being 2 stroke it would never start, and when it did would grab hold of stuff like Ivy and wind it up

till the silly thing climbed over the fence seemed a good idea at the time , I gave it to the allotment club

never to be seen again.

pete

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Unusual lawn mower experience recently, photodermatitis!

First cut of the year, and I was also cutting down green undergrowth on the verge.

Two days later, intensely itchy, raised rash on my forearms, strictly limited to the area below my rolled up shirt cuffs. A little research found that some plants, especially "wild carrot", a member of the cow parsely family, has sap that causes this reaction when exposed to sunlight. My rotary must have thrown up a mist of mulched sap.

 

Looking again in the garden, I have lots of these plants, related also to hemlock. If you have children/grandchildren might be worth hoeing them down, carefully!

 

Johnstone

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Unusual lawn mower experience recently, photodermatitis!

First cut of the year, and I was also cutting down green undergrowth on the verge.

Two days later, intensely itchy, raised rash on my forearms, strictly limited to the area below my rolled up shirt cuffs. A little research found that some plants, especially "wild carrot", a member of the cow parsely family, has sap that causes this reaction when exposed to sunlight. My rotary must have thrown up a mist of mulched sap.

 

Looking again in the garden, I have lots of these plants, related also to hemlock. If you have children/grandchildren might be worth hoeing them down, carefully!

 

Johnstone

My sympathies!

We have a lot of "Cow Parsley "  in hedges and around edges of gardens in these parts  (Isle  of Man)

Typically it is someone who has decided to use a strimmer on the Cow parsely but has dressed in shorts and tee shirt.

 Often they are either a newcomer or visitor to the area/ someone who has moved into a new property or just bought a powered gardening implement.

Where the sap and stem debris has splattered their skin but has also been exposed to sun the rash appears first itchy, then red with  very   clear demarcation where the skin is exposed giving a very typical appearance.It requires both the sap and UV light ,hence photodermatitis.

As you say there is a lag period between exposure and its appearance and because of this not everyone makes the connection.

However, once seen Its appearance is so typical that once seen it is a from "across the road diagnosis".

More rarely, children playing bite on the stem and blow  through as a pipe or like a type of pea shooter  and they get splashed around face and lips which can be unpleasant.

The skin usually  develops  some  vesicles - fluid filled blisters. Occasionally these can be really quite large when the reaction is severe.

It is unlikely to respond to antihistamines much once established . It is sometimes mistakenly thought to be an infection but antibiotics have  no effect. Steroid creams of the stronger prescription-only type( not the over the counter 1% hydrocortisone)  and  even a short course of steroids by mouth, for the more serious reactions, are quite  effective.

 

Awareness and/or avoidance /appropriate protective clothing best approach!

 

Andrew

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Giant Hog Weed is a close relative of Cow Parsley, produces similar symptoms and is possibly more dangerous. My daughter had one in her garden last year. I believe you have to notify officialdom if you find it.

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remember as a youngster out on a family convoy norfolk way and why we stopped at a place call Great Snoring i dont know why  

 but there was  cow parsley 2" thick 6ft tall   must have been planted by Dougs family 

 

         we had a stray cat adopt us a maraton fight to de flea him,  end result,,   most visitors where itching to leave 

 

               Pete

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  • 3 weeks later...

Faintheart!

 

Have you not removed the recoil, dismantled it, inspected, cleaned, oiled, retensioned it, and then found it still doesn't work?

That's the least we expect!

 

John

 

Even stood on my head and looked at it upside down, to no avail. It apparently requires two bolts of some strange American thread that exist nowhere else on the planet; said bolts having dropped out around my garden somewhere. In any case the Lawnmower man - who had forgotten my mobile number thereby forcing me to call with him after two weeks of waiting and the grass growing ever higher - replaced them and serviced the whole machine so that it now runs very sweetly and in three hours last night filled five rubble sacks with cut grass. Only the other half of the garden to cut now.

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The trouble is the more you cut it, the more it grows. Only did mine last week and it's no longer a lawn, it's a meadow. The bloke across the road has scattered wild flowers seeds on his lawn, very pretty, with the added advantage you only cut it once a year.

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I'm currently trying to buy a ride-on mower from Gumtree, and have replied to lots of ads... only one seller got back to me, and she is apparently a girl called Zoe who is actually selling a rowing machine.... strange cos the ad says it's just been serviced and has a 42" cut. Maybe she rows around the garden and gets fitter as the grass gets shorter... 

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