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Rust removal


euan douglas

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I need to remove surface rust from the sill area of the GT6 and was looking at the Bilt Hamber products, specifically the DEOX-GEL and Hydate 80.  They look a lot better than Kurust so I was wondering if anyone has any experience of these products?

Never quite sure how effective Kurust is, it looks as though it is doing something but does it work, in fact do any of them???

Thanks for any input

 

Euan

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Euan.

 

IMHO, Bilt Hamber has no rival.

 

Once you have sorted the rust issue, you can use their Dynax 50 which is light years ahead of anything else on the market.

 

Regards.

 

Richard.

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It is important to remove as much rust as possible first. So blunt cheisel etc to get chuncks of rust off, then a wire brush in a drill or better grinder gets 99% off. Though a brush won't remove rust scale, that need flapwheels, chisels etc.

 

And allteh rust killers use the same basic stuff, phosphoric acid. It does work. Some is rather better than others! Soaking kitchen roll and covering with clingfilm stops it drying out too fast. Warm weather makes it work faster (rule of thumb, 10 degrees temp rise doubles rate of reaction)

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As a rust remover, any 'weak' acid, one that will attack rust more readily than the native metal, will do.  All the organic acids are in this group, not hydrochloric or sulfuric, but acetic acid (vinegar) as an example which will convert iron oxides to a soluble 'salt' of the acid and wash it away.    The feature of phosphoric acid that makes it a good rust treatment is that iron phosphate is insoluble in water.    As it forms, it stays on the surface, protecting it from the flash rust that otherwise appears and when dry is a good, hard surface for painting with primer.     It has that black colour that all the commercial preps aim for.

 

So as Clive says, attack the rust mechanically first, then consider using another organic acid, before phosphoric as your last stage.    Both acetic and phosphoric are safe to use, always remembering to wear eye protection, gloves and to wash hands afterwards.    

 

John

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Thanks everyone for your replies.  I guess DEOX GEL is the way to go though I take all the points about degreasing and removing as much rust as possible before use.

 

Would you say the Hydrate 80 works in the same way as Kurust  -  a rust converter rather than a remover.  It seems to me a remover must be more effective than a converter?

 

Euan

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Hi Euan

 

I can't say I've used the DEOX stuff - I opted for the POR 15 system and I have to say I'm impressed although as with anything only time will tell.

 

To reiterate the above, rusting is a chemical reaction that actually increases the volume of the steel as a result of oxidation. Rust treatment effectively reverses the oxidised metal back to solid metal via a chemical acid reaction - although it obviously cant reform flakes back to a solid piece of steel. So the advice of mechanically  removing loose rust is sound. Those systems that leave the additional zinc/phosphatic coating obviously provide additional protection. Unless I'm mistaken they all convert rust so ultimately remove it. 

 

Obviously the more you mechanically remove the less original metal you have to work with.

 

Good luck!

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I have used a few over the years. From elbow grease to paint-ons.  But now find a product called Fertan  is by far the best. 

I have used it on my tractors, ride-on mowers, antique door locks and my coupe any thing that has rusty metal. Brilliant stuff.

 

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Hi Euan

 

To reiterate the above, rusting is a chemical reaction that actually increases the volume of the steel as a result of oxidation. Rust treatment effectively reverses the oxidised metal back to solid metal via a chemical acid reaction - although it obviously cant reform flakes back to a solid piece of steel. So the advice of mechanically  removing loose rust is sound. Those systems that leave the additional zinc/phosphatic coating obviously provide additional protection. Unless I'm mistaken they all convert rust so ultimately remove it. 

 

Obviously the more you mechanically remove the less original metal you have to work with.

 

Good luck!

 

 

No!   The only rust treatment that can convert rust back into native metal is electrolysis - which you can try, but finding a bath big enough to dunk the sills in ....

None of the painted or sprayed treatments do this - they area all phosphating.

Anyway, flakes of iron converted from rust will contribute nothing to the structure, let alone the appearance, so correct on mechanical removal, but for the wrong reasons!

 

John

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