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US Air Force Spitfire Story


JohnD
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Hello John.

 

That's is an outstanding piece of footage and well done for finding it + sharing on here.

 

A friend of mine is a WW2 aircraft historian and I will send him the link; he may be able to add something to your find.

 

Thanks for posting.

 

Regards.

 

Richard.

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We had a Merlin running at power at a previous Duxford event

 

awsome inpiring what these guys coped with and achieved

pete

 

In the early 1950's BOAC used the Argonaut (Douglas DC4 variant) for long haul flights.  It was fitted with four Merlin engines and it was NOISY.  After a near 17 hour flight with several refueling stops to Kuwait it took several days for our ears to stop ringing.  It was always a little disturbing when they shut down one engine during flight ...... 

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here we are   me on a Merlin

the engine came down from a Co in Carlisle

 

someone has nicked the wings  !!!!

 

this is pete saunders and me the  one in  hat 

apart from the travel costs £200  we used £90 of fuel on 3   15  minute runs ups 

we dont have the are funds to do that again for a while 

 

 

and DUXFORD ALL TRIUMPHS IS SEPTEMBER    10th

 

Pete

post-14-0-79749000-1502270680_thumb.jpg

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Pete, I've just been checking back through my collection of show guides, I remember there was a Merlin displayed at Hayes Castle show at Distington, Cumbria a few years ago. It turns out it was 2007... There were 2 Merlins, an Alvis and a Rolls Royce aero engines. Absolutely magnificent to see and hear running. (The then owners names are here should you need them.) The Merlin is 27 litre, 1280HP. Remember the guy in the 70s built a car around one? John, John... can't remember.

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here we are   me on a Merlin

the engine came down from a Co in Carlisle

 

someone has nicked the wings  !!!!

 

this is pete saunders and me the  one in  hat 

apart from the travel costs £200  we used £90 of fuel on 3   15  minute runs ups 

we dont have the are funds to do that again for a while 

 

 

and DUXFORD ALL TRIUMPHS IS SEPTEMBER    10th

 

Pete

Now that's what you call a mobility scooter!

 

Gully

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They had both a Merlin, probably the same one, and a Bristol Hercules running side by side at the Bicester Flywheel Festival last month.

 

izknCi.jpg

 

IOBQEA.jpg

 

Mrs B and myself stood behind them while they were running, and even with micro props attached the backdraft and noise were incredible.

 

Back to the original topic, the USAAF used a number of British aircraft in WWII, including the Supermarine Spitfire, Bristol Beaufighter, DeHavilland Mosquito, Boulton Paul Defiant amongst others.

 

Of course we used an awful lot of theirs as well!

 

Karl

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Same year as we had the merlin ,We did sit in a real working spitfire in duxford 2013 expecting a good number of takers we only had about 20

 

Seemed a good idea ,but wasted the owners a lot of time , good ideas dont always work out.

 

one year we raffled a flight in a Tiger moth, had to re pull the winner about 20 times before it

took off......at times you cant win ...

 

this year just cars and planes and tanks etc no gimmicks September 10th bring your cars

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Out sailing in Chichester Harbour this afternoon greeted by sight and sound of a Spitfire and Hurricane in the overhead.  This is a regular, almost daily at this time of the year, occurrence as they are part of Boultbee Aviation based at Goodwood. 

http://www.boultbeeflightacademy.co.uk/

 

Dick

ps You know you want to and you only live once and why not spend their inheritance?

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There's been an advert in a weekly classic car newspaper for the past few weeks, for a catalytic pellet that you "just pop in your tank", apparently a similar item was used in planes during WW2. Do they actually work, or do you subconsciously put your foot down harder to convince yourself that you haven't just blown another 30 quid? I can see the theory but is it along the lines of the clip-on fuel line magnet jobbies?

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I've yet to find something scientific other than "yes it works" (from the people who make them) or "no it doesn't" (from people who've tried them).

 

I have a friend, very practical and knowledgeable with classics (he has 7!) and he has them in all his cars. He's totally convinced they work. 

 

I no longer use fuel additive since discovering "the memory of lead theory" let alone this stuff.

 

Here's an amusing exchange on the Morris Minor club site.

 

http://www.mmoc.org.uk/Messageboard/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=44647&start=0

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Interesting article to read! I've got to admit the jury's still out with me on this one, the seller does offer a money-back guarantee. ( no return needed!) I wasn't intending buying one. Back in the 70's I met an elderly man, I believe he was a retired motor engineer running a large Vauxhall, a Cresta or Velox, and he was running it with a steam-injection system in addition to the carbs. It was something he had cobbled together, powered by heat from the exhaust manifold. He did attract interest and scepticism, but he swore by it. And no, there wasn't a great plume of steam when it was running...

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Seems not to be across the whole Merlin engine community as there was a Spitfire over The Solent twice today.

Only the Merlin engined aircraft are grounded, and therefore the later Griffin engines Spitfires are still flying, and that may be what you saw.

 

Not heard the pellet theory before, but Many WWII aircraft used water/methanol injected into the cylinders to increase power for short periods, as use for longer than say 10 minutes resulted in damage to the pistons and bores.

 

Karl

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