Jump to content

Sound proofing and carpet underfelt


Benlm77
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

Does anyone have experience of fitting sound\heat proofing to a triumph spitfire?

 

I'm considering fitting dynamat + dynerliner instead of the typical underfelt.  I should say here that the car has now been totally stripped and fully painted both inside and out so I have a blank canvas to start with.

 

However I'm somewhat confused on what to use for the best balance between a comfortable drive and adding weight affecting the performance, I've read lot about Dynamat extreme and Dynamat Superlite and still not sure.

 

Does anyone have any experiecne of either sound proofing and recarpetting a spitfire or the Dynamat product itsself?

 

Many thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dynamat had a ( poorly sited ) stand at the TSSC  international.They were kitting out a vitesse......Good guys with a great product. Bought a kit of extreme. . its a bit weighty, but of good quality. ( although I am still yet to fit it!) best bet is to ring them and have a chat. Or Ring Garth at hq  and get his views.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sound "proofed" my 1500 spitfire last year using a similar material to the Dynamat - 

 

Silent Coat Noise Isolator 10 - Sound Absorbing mat & Ground Zero GZDM 800-GOLD Sound Deadening mat.

 

The only reason I chose not to use Dynamat was cost - the Silent Coat product was cheaper. Unfortunately the Dynamat product wasn't available from the club shop at the time but I think you'll find that Garth has negotiated better prices for the Dynamat product which may well now be cheaper from the club than Silent Coat.  

 

It's well worth doing. The difference is quite surprising and the whole car feels more solid. Don't forget to insulate the door skins and inside the boot.

 

Be aware that the sound deadening (the shiny stuff in the photos) is unbelievably sticky - make sure you position carefully as it's a bugger to peel off to re-position. 

 

 

Here's a link to the photos.

 

Good luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Clive, that is very encouraging, nice pics too!

 

Did you find it added a lot of weight to the car?   And did you notice any difference in performance afterwards, just curious as a lot of what I have read suggests it is extremly heavy though in my mind once you factor in the weight of the alternative standard underfelt the difference must be fairly marginable, be interested to hear your thoughts.

 

Also am I correct in saying that the Noise Isolator 10 is similar to the Dynaliner offered by Dynamat which goes on top of the shiny deadning mat?

 

Thanks again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't worry about the weight too much. And balance that with the fact it is a spitfire, not a saloon car. So it will never be exactly quiet. 

The quietest spitfire I have driven was a very low mileage, totally unmolested one. That had nothing fancy except it had factory (or probably dealer applied) underseal and justb the old type felt carpet underlay.

I have greatly improved the sound issues in cars by making sure all holes are sealed with grommits or just sealed up. It is amazing how many unused holes there seem to be, either original or added over the years. Then making sure the tunnel is well fitted and sealed. Then I added the bitumen type pads to the bulkhead (behind pedals and same pass side) then used rubber waffle domestic carpet underlay. The heavy one. Sadly light stuff just does not work anywhere near as well.

 

If I was prepared to spend some proper money, dynamat or similar would be my choice, applied to the main floor sections etc, and also the rear cockpit panel. Don't get too worried about it, the law of diminishing returns applies heavily here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Client, points noted and much appreciated,  grommets and spare holes already filled (quite what they are all for who knows!)

 

I think I then plan to go the Dynamat and Dynaliner route, I only plan in doing this sort of thing once so this seems the best alround approach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to add confusion, there are two of us Clives replying to your post!

 

For further confusion, I incorrectly referred to the noise absorbtion mat as Isolator 10 - it's Isolator 8 - it's 8mm thick. Here's the product which I fitted on top of the Ground Zero sound deadening mat.

 

Yes, Dynamat Dynaliner is a very similar product to the Silent Coat Isolator 8.

 

As the other Clive says, the increase in weight is negligible - both noise deadener and absorber together weigh about 3.5 kgs/sqm and I used 3.3 sqm to do the whole of the cockpit floor, door skins and boot floor - so you may be adding about 12 kgs to the car's weight.

 

Whether you decide to go for the absorber as well as the deadener is up to you but, again, as Clive says, the benefit of the absorber will be far less noticeable than the deadener.

 

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've told this story before, but ....

 

People obsess about heat getting into the car, and thinking that the gearbox or the exhaust pipe is the source, with putting expensive thermal insulation inside the gearbox cover.  Not so.   All that heat comes from the radiator at the front, and gets inside the car around the poor sealing of the cover the the bulkhead, and the many holes in the bulkhead that are often unused and left open/

 

I can say this with confidence, because once upon a time I built a Vitesse with a radiator in the back.   Silverback was a cold car.   Even on nice summer days, my hands would get cold!  There was no heat at all coming through from the gearbox or exhaust pipe.

 

Soundproofing, I can't advise you on, but instead of expensive thermal insulation, pay strict attention to the sealing of cover to floor/bulkhead and to sealing all those little holes in the bulkhead!

 

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Heavy carpet underlay (as in house) works well, the rubber waffle stuff made a hudge difference in my car when I fitted it. However, it does absorb water. 

Mine was used for the RBRR and I reckoned it was worthwhile for a 48hour non-stop drive (but sadly we never got to the start, long story) but came out after.

Will be refitting for this years event.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...