Jump to content

No more MOT's for my GT6


Qu1ckn1ck
 Share

Recommended Posts

It appears that the government has now confirmed that cars reaching the age of 40 years will now be exempt from annual MOT testing.  I guess my 1971 GT6 has had it's last test.

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/644412/government-response-to-exempting-vehicles-of-historical-interest-from-roadworthiness.pdf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well what to say, we seem to always rule to let the loonies off the hook

a quick 3rd party casting an eye over your beloved car seems more sensible than not doing it.

are we back to rubber bands holding track rod ends  together and lumps of plywood under the handbrake lever  floor. ??

I just cant see any advantage in this idea despite all the analysis and supposed reasoning

im for voluntary MOT then from now on 

Pete

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes.

MOT every year for my 2x classics be they exempt or not.

For less than £1 per week seems good sense to have that peace of mind as Paul & Pete have mentioned.

Personally, I think it is one of the most ludicrous and potentially dangerous bits of legislation rubber stamped within the automotive industry.

Regards.

Richard. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I understand the argument about the annual test supporting drivers to get an assessment but as vehicles registered before 1960 already have this concession then all this does is in effect provide a rolling exemption. There is nothing to stop users using an MOT test as part of their annual service as I probably will.
It is a fact that older (cherished) vehicles statistically present a much reduced risk to other road users because of the care owners undertake. Proof in the pudding are the significantly reduced insurance premiums for classic cars. Insurance premiums are all calculated on risk by geeky acturists who are not sentimental!

 I bought my GT6 with an MOT not worth the paper it was written on, but identified and corrected several serious faults within days.  I believe most historic car owners have far more awareness of their car's faults or weaknesses than a 20 year old MOT tester inspecting strictly to a prescribed checklist.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When my Spitfire was MOT'd 2 weeks ago a broken leaf spring was identified. There is no way that I would have spotted it!!  Just wait for the question on your next insurance proposal "Does your car have a current MOT certificate".. yes- cheaper premium... no-excess loading... simples!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well my January 1971-registered GT6 passed its MOT today and I doubt it will be its final test. Happy to let a competent tester give it an inspection annually for peace of mind.

I'm sure our insurers will soon force some form of road-worthiness check - the older vehicle voluntary inspection scheme will no doubt be extended and 'encouraged'!

Gully

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be testing mine as usual if this rule applies to Northern Ireland as well. We'll probably see some kind of Insurance reduction for those with - and maybe a hefty rise for those without.

As Peter says, a third party can spot things we've missed and I'd rather their rolling road / shaky machinery type thing spots a broken shock or faulty wheel bearing before a trip along a bumpy road finds it first. I usually look forward to the MOT as I do a trip to the dentist but once it's done... woohoo!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tried to find some more information on this as to whether mot's will continue to be recorded by the DVLA on our cars and althoughnot conclusive it would seem not  

Another issue going forward is the rules to which the MOT inspector will follow in future years for our cars as these will no longer be in their "book"  

I would like to get hold of the test procedure / measurements etc as currently exist.  At least then the test would be consistent as of now  ( thinking long term here!!?)

 

Aidan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello.

I've just spoken with a friend who is an MOT tester and his understanding is as follows:

1. if an owner submits their pre-60's or any other exempt vehicle for a voluntary MOT, the result be it Pass or Fail will be recorded.

2. the reasoning behind this is that the test and subsequent result is submitted electronically to DVLA and as such uploaded accordingly, this is because the MOT tester must log on to the DVLA MOT testing pro-forma application before the test can be carried out / started.

3. further to the above, if an appeal is lodged whereby the owner of the vehicle thinks it should have passed, but the inspector thinks not, then an independent inspection will be required and the original paperwork pertaining to the contested MOT result will need to be in evidence prior and during the re-test. Conversely if a car passes an MOT test and in essence it should not have passed - calling the inspectors competence in to question then again the original paperwork must be available.

4. no MOT certificate can be raised unless the MOT inspector logs on to the DVLA inspection site; this action alone creates a record and therefore the test result needs to be logged, once that is done it is automatically updated on to the DVLA MOT History website address and enters the public domain. 

5. finally and as an aside, if an exempt vehicle fails a MOT test there is no legal requirement for the keeper / owner of that vehicle to have the vehicle retested at all and there is no legal requirement for the vehicle defect(s) to be repaired. Therefore the vehicle can "legally" be returned to the road despite the defects having been identified.

Of course as everybody knows or should know, the MOT PASS certificate only confirms that the vehicle was found to be in a legal and roadworthy condition at the TIME OF THE TEST and most certainly does not cover any period of time thereafter once that vehicle has immediately & physically moved off the MOT Testing Station premises. 

Hope the above is of assistance ??

Regards.

Richard.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's probably very true, Andy.

But if you are handing over money for the job to be done, you may as well go the full hog and have the certificate for the expense and trouble.

As such, why would you bother going to the MOT Station in the first instance if you were not interested in getting the car checked fully and hopefully gaining a pass certificate at the end of it ??

Regards.

Richard. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand your point, I was thinking ahead to a point where the MoT station may not be able to issue a certificate (because it doesn't need one based in first-reg date) from the DVLA-linked system.  At which point you can still get the job done so not a big issue.

.... Andy 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely Andy, I'm sure we have yet to witness the real twists and turns of this bizarre situation.

I think it's fair to say "we" will see a legal challenge on this at some stage and from there most likely a legal Stated Case / Point of Law.

Regards.

Richard.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Quote

Another issue going forward is the rules to which the MOT inspector will follow in future years for our cars as these will no longer be in their "book"  

I would like to get hold of the test procedure / measurements etc as currently exist.  At least then the test would be consistent as of now  ( thinking long term here!!

https://www.mot-testing.service.gov.uk/documents/manuals/m4i00000101.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The responsbility for ensuring your car is  roadworthy is, and frankly  always has been , entirely yours.

If it is a danger to others , you should be  nailed for it.

Whilst I understand the  common sense for  getting another opinion on the roadworthiness of your car, there are other ways than through an MOT.

The loss of a small  piece of goverment interference  in peoples lives should , even if perceived as an increase in personal responsibility, be welcomed.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Vanadium23 said:

The responsbility for ensuring your car is  roadworthy is, and frankly  always has been , entirely yours.

If it is a danger to others , you should be  nailed for it.

Whilst I understand the  common sense for  getting another opinion on the roadworthiness of your car, there are other ways than through an MOT.

The loss of a small  piece of goverment interference  in peoples lives should , even if perceived as an increase in personal responsibility, be welcomed.

 

This of course assumes that people are responsible. Believe me, they aren't.

If there's a bodge they'll do it, if there's a corner cutter, they'll take it. We have a massive increase in the number of uninsured vehicles at present, and the number of vehicles I see almost daily with dangerously bald tyres is becoming alarming.

If we can have people killed by bicycles which have no front brakes, it's a short step to people with that mindset applying it to cars safe in the knowledge that no-one will ever check, and rules will only be enforced AFTER something serious has happened. If you want to argue that the MOT only shows the condition of a vehicle on THAT day, then think about what people have had to do to their cars to get it through the test on THAT day - new tyres, new brakes, broken windscreen or lights repaired. It brings them back up to a standard, no matter what they do afterwards.

Thank goodness this may only apply to cars over 40 years old; having said that, do you really want to meet someone's latest barn find driving straight from thirty or more years of storage to their home without even a condition check? It'll happen...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...