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Multimeter Died


Paul H
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I have something similar, two for the price of one in Halfords. One died within a year, so build quality not so good.  But I still have the other 10 years old, I think? Just bought two more from Halfords for my son-in-laws' Christmas, stop the buggers borrowing mine! Halfords are under £10, but not as cheap as that!

http://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/tools/hand-tools/rolson-digital-multimeter

 

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1 hour ago, Paul H said:

Hi my Hilka Multimeter has died after 15 years and its not the battery - looking for a replacement - Not looking for anything too technical as only basic functions used so is this one ok  or should I spend a bit more £

Thanks in advance 

I like this one as uses PP3 whereas my dead Hilka uses an obscure 12v A23S + there is no auto switch off . Maybe its more than 15 years old 

Paul 

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Auto switch off would be good, I've lost a few batteries like that. This one doesn't come with a battery so that's an extra £3 (?) Which makes the Halfords one cheaper. Also they can't spell Transistor, which makes me suspicious, never trust a badly put together ad.

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As well as my Halfords special, I have an AVO 8. I don't use it, it's sacred, I wouldn't want to risk damaging it. I'm waiting for a leather carrying case to come up on Ebay. I've also got a Mega, you use it to find the breakdown voltage of isolated circuits. Wonderful if you have a younger brother. "Just hold these while I wind this handle." 

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I went for a Sealey TA101 a few years ago, mind you it was in a sale at Trago Mills in Cornwall so the saving was significant. It includes a temperature facility and have used that far more than I thought I would.

It really is horses for courses and what your wallet can bear at the end of the day.

Regards.

Richard.

 

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Doug - I remember a tv drama from years back where a building site foreman used to urinate in a corner of the site, much to the disgust of his underlings. They hid a steel plate in that corner and connected a fully charged mega to it. When it got wet...!!!!! Brilliant scene.

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  • 3 months later...
On 07/11/2017 at 1:10 PM, Badwolf said:

Doug - I remember a tv drama from years back where a building site foreman used to urinate in a corner of the site, much to the disgust of his underlings. They hid a steel plate in that corner and connected a fully charged mega to it. When it got wet...!!!!! Brilliant scene.

Not just T-V drama`s. Back in the 50`s, Yes I am That Old!, As a young apprentice, there was similar incident on Hull Fish docks, the "recipient" was not quite so lucky, He finished up in Hospital having had an "induced" Heart attack. P-C plod got involved and it became very nasty!.

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I remember that , 

Also at a local fete we mad a wonky wire that rung a bell if the hoop made contact , this was uprated with wires down the hand grip and a HT coil so when the hoop made contact on release blew the cobwebs away with a vengence, this was 1p a go with a £ if you got to the end of the wire run, 

We had to withdraw due to irrate parents little jimmy was never the same 

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  • 2 weeks later...

A year ahead of us at a prestigeous private school here in Melbourne wired a suitably earthed telecom 90v battery (if I remember correctly) to the brass door handle of the teachers common room, this  caused some hilarity amongst the pupils, no detention on the last day of school.

At the end of middle school (around 14yrs old) we put the French teachers Fiat 500 in the tennis court, easy to unweave cyclone fencing, punishment was to wash the head of middle schools Chrysler Imperial, we removed carb and fitted a full face cardboard gasket then re-assembled!! Got a 40 pound bill at the start of next term plus a weeks detention, mum didn't tell dad! Aah the good old days.

When we got to senior school the school head decided to channel our enthusiasm by putting us in charge of the physics an chem labs, not a good move, but the school and us survived that too!

Regards

Peter T

 

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HA!

never mind the cocoa tin full of gas , we filled a 5 gallon oil drum ,  small hole in the lid and it blew immeadiately

Took about a month for  the hair and eyebrows to re grow from a good synging,   I can still envisage the flash!!

It was also common to get some gas hose and blow down the gas tap to keep putting teachers  bunsen out

Pete

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My secondary school had old WW2 air raid bunkers. The upper sections looked like portacabins, only in brick. They had to be demolished because without fail at the end of term, teacher's car on the roof. Bubble cars were quite easy, larger models required more ingenuity and the fire brigade to get them down.

Doug

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Interesting, if anecdotal, accounts of the conductive properties of a urine stream.

The critical factor is, from how far away?     Surface tension tends to break up a continuous stream of liquid, and it turns into separate droplets between the, er, origin, and ground level, so no conduction to frazzle your jazzle.   But if, say, the electricity were at arms length, the result would be more than exciting.

John

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