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Young driver insurance


Anglefire
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I would speak with the insurance companies first to see exactly what their stance is on premiums; placing you as a named driver will help to lower the cost.

Additionally when your son passes a black box or undertaking the "Plus Pass" scheme will also assist in premium reduction.

The TSSC insurance panel of companies will be a good starting point and of course you can use a Herald as an example vehicle to get an idea of quotes.

Perhaps your own modern vehicle insurance may encompass a multi-policy scheme.

Plenty of enquiries to be conducted but certainly the above will give a steer.

Regards.

Richard. 

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you may find young drivers old  under 25 yrs in classics are loaded due to escort and other hot hatch idiots upping the premiums , theres been lots fact and figures elsewhere on here

you might might find a small modern is much cheaper , something like a Citroen C1 .fiat 500    and so on ,, dont look at corsa thats another risk adict

Pete

 

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I’ll third a C1 as a good option, particularly the first generation ones as they are cheap as chips.

I’ve had 2 over the years and done over 110k in mine on my daily commute, and they have both been utterly reliable.

Add in 8 airbags, ABS & ESP and you have a very safe package that’ll do 55 mpg.

Karl

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If you are keen on learning in a classic (I learnt in a Herald and it didn’t do me too much harm!) then you’d be best to talk (not use online quotes) to the likes or Peter James and get their position...  it is possible but will take some energy.

the cheap/cheerful modern route is likely to be the simplest option .... from an insurance perspective the C1/107 is a very good choice.... under 1l engine, lowest insurance group and very plentiful - there are loads of 8/9 year old ones around for fair prices that still look like 2year olds. Lastly they sip fuel and are cheap to service (only need 3plugs!)

 

For regular insurancance try Diamond, they’ll do a first policy of 10months then give the named driver 1year NCB... add yourself as a named driver and watch the premium reduce by a couple of hundred pounds.

be careful of insurers who will raise the premium when the learner passes their test (Directline used to be the worst for this) - ask the question when sorting out quotes - you will not find this 8nformation offered voluntarily with online quotes.

happy hunting..... you will get bored stupid with giving all your details!

..... Andy 

 

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3 hours ago, Bordfunker said:

I’ll third a C1 as a good option, particularly the first generation ones as they are cheap as chips.

I’ve had 2 over the years and done over 110k in mine on my daily commute, and they have both been utterly reliable.

Add in 8 airbags, ABS & ESP and you have a very safe package that’ll do 55 mpg.

Karl

There are variations over the marques, I think the Peugeot 107 version has rear headrests as standard and little things like that. My daughter loves hers and £40 petrol does her ages. I added a rev counter to help her driving and they're really simple to work on or service. They remind me of the Herald in so many ways - two door, one single dial, great all-round visibility, and so easy to park - you can see where the four corners of the car are.

As Andy says, her Insurance went UP after she passed her test, as they reckoned she'd now be driving unaccompanied. Her first policy cost me more than the car cost.

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I echo the safety concerns. I'd be very concerned if mine was driving a tiny car surrounded by razor sharp tin,  with no crash protection and only adequate brakes and poor lighting at best. Insurance likely to be a 'mare too because the repair costs are so high compared to a modern car. 

Not being sexist either but breakdowns are inevitable and will expose a young lass to all sorts of danger stood waiting on a dark road. 

An old motor is a quaint romantic notion but practically an unnecessary danger in so many ways. 

I got my lad an old focus. Nice little car, cheap and easy to tinker with. Then he got himself an A3 which is a brilliant car in almost every dept. 

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17 minutes ago, AndyTV8 said:

If you are keen on learning in a classic (I learnt in a Herald and it didn’t do me too much harm!) 

I'll show you my scars sometime,  acquired 35 years ago. I can vouch for the fact that a little flimsy tin can can do a heck lot of damage to you. And I was only doing about 30mph at the time. 

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Both my daughters learnt in a 1971 mini (as in passed tests 4 and 2 years ago) but they used it for their Saturday job (sainsburys) and eventually we all lost heart with the damp start issues (despite keeping a fresh/dry cap and leads in the car ready to fit!) especially as it was invariably wet and late at night.

Sold it and use the money to by a pug 107.  3yrs old and only 13K on the clock, seemed a good deal as we only had to add £200! and once you understand they are cheaply built but actually pretty well designed I think they are great little cars. (worth checking age, early cars up to 2010ish ?? had a smaller clutch that is renowned for its short life) 

Re insurance, it seems obvious insurance increases once they have passed their test. They are suddenly unsupervised and think they are driving gods! About the highest risk group imaginable.

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It was only a thought - I do agree about the safety side though I do think that in the old days we used to drive more carefully - today drivers are a lot faster as they expect a) not to crash and b ) survive without a scratch if they do . 

I'll look into the C1 type route though as it probably is a more sensible idea - especially as she may go to Uni away from home.

 

Thanks for all the replies though - if nothing else i have ideas of alternative modern cars. Though preferably it has to be yellow B) 

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8 hours ago, Anglefire said:

It was only a thought - I do agree about the safety side though I do think that in the old days we used to drive more carefully - today drivers are a lot faster as they expect a) not to crash and b ) survive without a scratch if they do . 

We had to drive more slowly, drum brakes, ify handling, poor tyres and candles for headlights.

I'm not sure we ever drove more carefully though, but the metal spike pointing right at your chest and the lethal front end pointing right at pedestrians probably helped to keep you down to a 'sensible' speed :)

I feel sorry for all the youngsters who have to drive around with one of those hateful telemetrics boxes, I'm sure there's plenty of people here who learnt how to handle a car by going a little bit faster than they should when they were young, or heaven forbid, had a bit of fun.

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Actually I think power steering has not helped with speed.  You can chuck a modern into bends at much higher speeds these days because you can wind on and off the steering so much quicker and easier. (Particularly into side roads). 

The whole debate about speed limits and the general reduction of them will run and run. 

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