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UJs greasing how?


Andrew
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Ok this is driving me mad.

just discovered my UJs have removable screws. To allow grease nipples to be fitted.  I have bought a couple of long nipples so I can fit them in, grease the UJs then remove the nipples and put the blanking screws back in.  Question how do you get the nipples in because as you screw them in they foul on the UJ. I did manage to get one in, but then I could not get the grease gun on the nipple, any bright ideas please.

regards

Andrew

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22 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

As for you nipples , there are metric and unified threaded   extentions , / and uj threads , which wont help if youre mixed

Andrew,

Carefully compare the thread on the blanking screw you've taken out with the longest straight grease nipple you've got to make sure they're the same.

I don't thing any other shape will fit once a UJ is on car.

With care it should go in, then you've then just got to find a gun that fits.

David

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Hi all

so I think the only thing is replace when they start knocking, I can wait.  As I have not got the skills here is a challenge to anyone.  What about cutting a long straight nipple in half.  Solder each end to an inserted tube, so the result would be a three inch long nipple.  Then the club shop could buy and stock them, I would buy a couple. What are your thoughts

Andrew

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10 hours ago, Andrew said:

Hi all

so I think the only thing is replace when they start knocking, I can wait.  As I have not got the skills here is a challenge to anyone.  What about cutting a long straight nipple in half.  Solder each end to an inserted tube, so the result would be a three inch long nipple.  Then the club shop could buy and stock them, I would buy a couple. What are your thoughts

Andrew

Those would certainly start knocking... off the bottom of the car, every rotation! (Just fooling - I know you remove them afterwards!)

However if you cut a nipple in half and inserted a plastic flexible tube - such as screen washer tubing - in between the halves, you may be able to screw it in sufficiently to get the grease in, whilst it would bend to allow freer access from the grease gun. Worth a think in the garage later....

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Question: Which way does ("would" -- assuming it could be fitted) the grease fitting face? If it's facing the flange, I can understand the problem, and I'm thinking the u-joint was installed backwards. That fitting should face the axle shaft so that, at some point of rotation, there would be plenty of room to fit the grease fitting.

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Never thought about being able to fit the UJ cross piece in backwards, but eons ago I modified an extended grease nipple as suggested ie a thin bit of copper tube about 1in long (ex oil pressure gauge) & it fits easily after 20yrs and frequent use on our small chassis fleet still OK & hasn't broken BUT you do have to be gentle when using esp fitting the grease gun hydraulic end on and off, as it is soft copper. Oh and yes it is just soft solder in.

I've attached a very poor quality photo taken with the phone, but you get the idea.

Regards

Peter T

Extended Nipple.jpg

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Yes the cross pin is thicker and off set to make space to thread the hole

It has to face away from the drive flange, 

Then there is the non greasable which case it doesnt matter,

And they all last a long time greased or sealed for life   so greasable can be desirable but its not overly important

After all   What you take off has often been in there for 40 years

Its a bit late to get paranoid about them  same as start up oil pressure knock   its been doing it for 40+ years

Its not a Real Problem   

Pete

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Hi.

Another aspect of greasing these apparently, is that grease will often not exit at all four points anyway. I gave up with mine after hearing this.

Thanks for re-iterating about start up knock not really being a problem Pete, as it used to be one of my favorite worries.

Have a good New Year everyone.

Dave  

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uj greasing is a bit hit and miss, to get grease in it has to allow escape of air ,crud and grease through the simple seals , as you say getting to all 4 journals is a challenge 

you never realy know if you succeed,

start up knock till the oil psi   developes scars the pants off many owners.  makes you wonder why they have lasted all these reliable years and theres panic for the last 

ten years of operation.    just fire it up on choke allow to fast idle till the lighs out then drive....easy

theres no worries about the modern car , can have the same problem of drain back or low psi on starting but with much tighter tolerances you dont hear the knocking

same as fuel,  use the highest octane you can get , you cant expect a jumbo jet to run  on tiger moth fuel

our cars are the same get as close to 100 as you can   set the timing close to factory and have a Va Va Rooom   for 2018

sleep well !!!

Pete

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And the cost/time/ease of doing an overhaul isn't massive - catch it early and the crank etc should last many years - modern engines are just so expensive to replace - I reckon you could swap a spitty engine out in a day (assuming you have a spare to drop in) - Would take a day to disconnect and reconnect the electrics in a modern!

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Not just the electrics I imagine, but all those other bits that are cramped in.

I think if your well off and can change a car every few years it's ok, but if your a bit strapped and can only buy older cars, then they could be difficult to diagnose/expensive/difficult to repair I imagine?. Not had one, so don't know.

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Dave,

I have a 12 year old "modern", it tells me when it needs a service and when bulbs are blown. Armed with an OBD2 meter I can interrogate it's brain and read error codes. Then I can fix it or  tell the garage what to fix, with little chance of their "Lets replace every thing approach".

OBD2 meters can be expensive but they're getting better and cheaper all the time, mine was under £40. BUT you have to ensure the one you buy will work with your car. 

Doug

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