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what you didnt now about speed camera's


Pete Lewis
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just had this sent and it makes interesting reading........be warned  !!

The truth and the lies behind Britain’s speed cameras

By Lisa Edwards
News entry dated 27th Dec 2017

If you drive carefully past a speed camera, adhering to the speed limit and think you are safe, then you might be wrong.  Most of us don’t realise that those big yellow boxes can do a lot more than just register our speed and send information that gets us a speeding ticket.  But just what are their full abilities?

The offence camera

The speed camera should rightly be called the offence camera because it can record many offences other than just speeding.  They include not wearing your seatbelt, using a mobile phone while driving and even having illegal number plates.

According to statistics for the north east of England, between August 2015 and November 2015 there were a total of nearly 700 drivers who were caught for not wearing a seatbelt through a speed camera.  This is an offence that does seem bizarre – not only is it the law to wear one but they can also save your life if you are involved in an accident.
 
speed.png

(Credit – Elliott Brown)

Speed camera spotting

Another big problem is the use of mobile phones while driving.  To highlight how serious it can be, the fine was increased to £200 in March this year and now comes with six points on the license if you are caught.

Now you can be caught by speed cameras when on your mobile phone and receive a fine just the same as you would if you were spotted by a police officer.  This also includes mobile speed cameras which are now recording a range of other offences in the same way as the stationary version.

The most common device used for mobile speed cameras, that can record various information, is the LTI 20.20 UltraLyte 1000.  This device uses a laser linked directly to a DVD system that is running the whole time that the enforcement is in operation.  It can collect an image from cars up to 1000 metres away and includes information such as the time, date, speed, distance, site coding and whether the vehicle was travelling towards or away from the camera.  This is all detailed on the image of the driver.

The mobile phone problem

The reason for the higher penalties and the use of speed cameras to catch drivers using a phone behind the wheel is because it remains a huge problem.  In one crackdown last November, police caught around 40 drivers per hour on their mobile phones, handing out 7966 fixed penalty notices during a one-week long campaign.

This was an increase on previous periods of enforcement on ‘distraction driving’ where a crackdown had been in place.  In May 2016, they had caught 2323 drivers, in September 2015 the figure was 2276 and in May 2015, the number of drivers caught was 2690.

During the same period, where 36 forces around the county participated, there were also hundreds of verbal warnings issued along with 68 court summonses and 117 other ‘distraction’ offences noted.  The figures were part of the reason why the new fines and points system was brought in the following March.

Mobile phone law

The current law on mobile phone states that it is illegal to drive a vehicle and use a hand held mobile phone or a similar device.  It is also illegal to supervise a learner driver while using a mobile.  The definition of ‘driving’ is also one to watch – you are driving if you have the engine running so merely pulling into a layby without turning the engine off won’t save you from a fine.  Stopping at traffic lights also still counts as driving.  You can use a hands-free kit but if you are shown to be not in ‘proper control’ of the vehicle while using it, you can be prosecuted
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"The speed camera should rightly be called the offence camera because it can record many offences other than just speeding.  They include not wearing your seatbelt, using a mobile phone while driving and even having illegal number plates."

Now you can be caught by speed cameras when on your mobile phone and receive a fine just the same as you would if you were spotted by a police officer.  This also includes mobile speed cameras which are now recording a range of other offences in the same way as the stationary version.

The most common device used for mobile speed cameras, that can record various information, is the LTI 20.20 UltraLyte 1000.  This device uses a laser linked directly to a DVD system that is running the whole time that the enforcement is in operation.  It can collect an image from cars up to 1000 metres away and includes information such as the time, date, speed, distance, site coding and whether the vehicle was travelling towards or away from the camera.  This is all detailed on the image of the driver."

This does not refer to the stationary camera, but the operator controlled camera such as a hand-held or speed-van version. In using these an operator can visually spot offences which are then proved by the footage recorded. The static road-side version is NOT operator monitored, and is only triggered by speed and the resulting photograph used as evidence. It cannot be triggered by anyone sitting in the drivers seat of a vehicle, whether wearing a seatbelt or not, but only by the vehicle exceeding the speedlimit. If however the photo shows the driver using a phone or not wearing a seatbelt then these offences can be processed additionally.

Incidentally town centre CCTV can also record offences, and be used as an aid to prosecution.

Easiest option is not to do it, rather than complain about how unfairly you were caught... :)

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The latter is not always that easy due to the idiotic way the British seem to arbitrarily adjust the limit for no apparent reason on the same bit of road.

I'd rather see (As we used to have) a simple system.

30 in built up areas.

40 on main roads

60 in the country

70 motorways.

There is no need for a 50 limit as the difference in safety (according to the speed awareness course I went on!) between 60 and 50 is marginal.

20 limits should be timed around the peak risk. (Though most areas around schools, you can't get to 20 let alone exceed it!)

No speed bumps.

Pedestrians need to be reminded to look where there are going and not to wear headphones when walking across streets - which will only get worse as more and more cars become electrified and pretty much silient. 

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Define "sensible"!  Let alone "logical common sense".  It took twenty years for the Tories to enable Sunday shopping and sports, when Tesco, B&Q and Sainsbury's  were doing it anyway, against the law!:

"30 in built up areas."   Where there are street lights?  Already so, Section 82(1)(a) (of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 (RTRA 1984))

40 on main roads

60 in the country    Define "country",   plenty of winding roads, between tall banks/hedges where more than 40mph is not safe

70 motorways"   Already so.  Road Traffic Regulation Act,1984.

But anyway, that last Act sets the National Speed Limit to 60, except on a motorway.    There are so many situations where 60 is too fast that there have to be some 50s and 40s, although I agree with you that they are often overcautious.   

John

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John, please don't get political. All the parties, in retrospect, have shafted this country. And it is impossible who has done the best job of it. Really, think about it, parties inherit something and that has massive inertia. Plus the business of government happens largely behind the scenes. I reckon Yes Minister is almost a documentary.

Anyway, I know what sensible is, I really don't need a definition! Besides, I doubt legislators are going to take a lot of notice of this thread, and they are the ones who get involved in the details. I am an ideas sort of person:)

 

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3 minutes ago, dougbgt6 said:

Nope. Round white sign with black diagonal means, 70 on a dual carriageway, 60 on a single carriageway.  Wonderful thing the Speed Awareness Course!

Doug

It's only 70 if there is a central reservation IIRC - a dual carriageway with no central barrier / reservation remains as 60 - not that there are many of those roads around anymore.

Gully

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Gully,

A dual carriageway, by definition has a central division. Two lanes in both directions is not a dual carriageway and so 60. The dual doesn't mean the number of lanes, it means the division between the two sets of lanes. Confusing huh! As I said, wonderful thing the Speed Awareness Course. :lol:

Doug 

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then there's street lamps  @ 30 unless its got   variant reminders on the posts  even on duals .

and the national limit is diffent again if your in a Van   under 7.5 ton or  towing a caravan etc.  or  heavy goods

you need to copy of highway code as a head up display to keep up to scratch 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, JohnD said:

60 in the country    Define "country",   plenty of winding roads, between tall banks/hedges where more than 40mph is not safe

70 motorways"   Already so.  Road Traffic Regulation Act,1984.

But anyway, that last Act sets the National Speed Limit to 60, except on a motorway.    There are so many situations where 60 is too fast that there have to be some 50s and 40s, although I agree with you that they are often overcautious.   

Country is anywhere that doesn't have many houses  - so not a named village/hamlet/town. 

This is where the driver has to take some responsibility - it is a limit, not a target. Different times of day/night make a difference, as does the weather. To set one limit just doesn't make sense.

 

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4 hours ago, dougbgt6 said:

Gully,

A dual carriageway, by definition has a central division. Two lanes in both directions is not a dual carriageway and so 60. The dual doesn't mean the number of lanes, it means the division between the two sets of lanes. Confusing huh! As I said, wonderful thing the Speed Awareness Course. :lol:

Doug 

In some ways it's a shame they've tidied up the drafting re dual carriageways and multi-lane carriageways (single carriageways) - according to my IAM friend the applicable National Speed Limit has been a favourite question of their examiners for years! 

At least I knew there was a difference in the speed limit, and what it was, if not the current terminology!

Gully

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I got done coming out of a village from a 30 to national - cops sat on the sign basically. No excuse, I was speeding (just 34 I think it was in a 30) - but what a joke - the road into the village would have been a better place to have it, if they wanted to slow drivers through the village - but it was the day of a rally and the traffic was mostly coming out of the village - worst thing was, is that I knew they were about as we "invited" them as a club to show we were responsible etc etc. :huh:

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48 minutes ago, Anglefire said:

I think the French work on wet roads rather than rain - but I agree it can be subjective - but is a good idea in principle - though why should we have to tell drivers to slow down to suit the conditions? Too much nanny state and not enough common sense. :wacko:

If you have the wipers on then it's wet, be it spray or rain. Not sure if on means on full time or intermittent. Personally I do what feels right. Around here the normal cruising speed on open roads is 100kph rather the legal limit of 90kph.

There is talk or reducing the limit from 90 to 80, can't see locals taking any notice of that unless there is a camera. ??

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