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Law of Unintended Consequences


Gully
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I'm sure we've all been there - repaired or replaced the broken / faulty bit on our Triumphs only to find it doesn't cure the problem we were seeking to solve. Well, the heater on my GT6 packed up earlier this year - clearly there was no flow through the matrix and it needed a flush (diagnosis based on the water in both the flow and return pipes warming close to the engine, but no evidence of flow). Rather irritating, as having properly sealed the tunnel and stopped up the holes in the bulkhead, the car has actually been cold inside over the recent weeks!

Anyway, I bought the car a new set of spark plugs for Christmas as it's been running a little bit rough and fitted them this afternoon. Slight rough running is still there, but the heater's now working again! ? 

On the rough running, I did find the car pulling in air through the small vent hole on top of the crankcase pressure control valve due to a holed diaphragm - new one on order, so fingers crossed that doesn't stop the heater working again...

HNY,

Gully

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18 minutes ago, Anglefire said:

I think every time I've ordered something for mine, I've found something else I should have ordered at the same time! Either a part for the job I'm doing, or something I've spotted or thought about on the way!

Or is it just me?

I can relate to that. Although I think I've gone the other way now - I buy all the bits I think I might need and have a rack of padded envelopes from Canleys, Moss, Paddocks etc with odd unused leftovers that may come in useful 'one day', by which time I'll have forgotten I have them! 

Pete - I did wonder about recycling part of a latex glove whilst waiting for the parts from Rimmers. I wouldn't want to give Gill another excuse to stop washing up! ?

Gully

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4 minutes ago, Gully said:

a rack of padded envelopes from Canleys, Moss, Paddocks etc with odd unused leftovers that may come in useful 'one day', by which time I'll have forgotten I have them! 

I have them too.  

Must bag up and more importantly mark what my many bags are for. I have all the bolts etc to replace the rear shockers. In fact I think I bought them twice. :huh:

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29 minutes ago, dougbgt6 said:

Gully,

So, new plugs have fixed your heater problem? Will you still be needing your GT6 shorts? 

Doug

Yes - new spark plugs fixed the heater. That's not in the manuals! ?

My GT6 shorts have been surplus to requirements for most of this year! A new tunnel seal kit and full set of fixings, along with some grommets in the bulkhead penetrations and new seal around the steering column and the shorts were redundant... And despite the newly invigorated heater, I still don't need them! Available free to a new home - 32 inch waist!

Is it 2018 yet?

 Gully 

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1 hour ago, AidanT said:

Thanks for the reminder! Ha still got this one to do.  Now wheres me shopping list!

 

Aidan

 

I made mine from a small corrugated rubber sheet I found in my Dad's garage - the cover plate removes easily from inside the footwell (2 screws if my memory is right) and the new seal simply drops in. Obviously a cut is needed to fit around the column - I had no intention of removing that again!

Gully

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10 hours ago, Gully said:

Available free to a new home - 32 inch waist!

Ah, about 10inches too small for me! 

I have a new plastic tunnel and seal kit to fit, once it gets a bit warmer. I've also got some sound/heat insulation for the tunnel and bulkhead, 40 sheets about A4 size, the pack is unbelievably heavy! Will probably take a couple of seconds off my 0 to 60 time!

Doug

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21 minutes ago, Gully said:

made mine from a small corrugated rubber sheet I found in my Dad's garage - the cover plate removes easily from inside the footwell (2 screws if my memory is right) and the new seal simply drops in. Obviously a cut is needed to fit around the column - I had no intention of removing that again!

Thanks Gully. I think I have just the thing in the workshop  one less thing for the shopping list!

What was the size of the hole required?

Aidan

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2 hours ago, AidanT said:

Thanks Gully. I think I have just the thing in the workshop  one less thing for the shopping list!

What was the size of the hole required?

Aidan

Sorry Aiden - can't recall the size of the hole. I simply measured the steering column outer diameter and used a closely sized hole saw on the rubber to make it a light interference fit. The circular hole is cut into a rectangular piece of material which follows the shape / size of the cover and retaining plate. Only real tip I have is to measure where the hole is in relation to the cover plate - mine was slightly offset from the central position. The old 'measure twice, cut once' syndrome!

It made a huge difference to the under bonnet heated air entering the cabin - really satisfying 20 min job ?

Gully

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Gully 

Just a quick thanks on this - replaced the seal this weekend with a cut out from a 4mm rubber sheet I had. 18mm hole for the column (it's actually 19.5) so a nice tight fit! 

I had to be a contortionist to unscrew and refit the plate but i have found that quite normal for small chassis triumphs!!

Aidan

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20 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

Feet in air, blood rush to the barnet, varifocals upside down and the tools you need are stuck under your left shoulder amd the part you dropped is now under the right

No amount of contortion will extricate the situation

Pete

That reminds me of when I had a Reliant Scimitar, to work on the wiring under the dashboard I used to lie upside down in the driver's seat with my feet over the headrest and my shoulders in the footwell. Anything I dropped or unscrewed used to hit me in the face. To get out you just rolled sideways, unless the door had closed in which case there was no chance of reaching the door handle and I just had to shout for help.

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5 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

That reminds me of when I had a Reliant Scimitar, to work on the wiring under the dashboard I used to lie upside down in the driver's seat with my feet over the headrest and my shoulders in the footwell. Anything I dropped or unscrewed used to hit me in the face. To get out you just rolled sideways, unless the door had closed in which case there was no chance of reaching the door handle and I just had to shout for help.

That’s the same approach I adopt when working on the Herald’s dashboard wiring!

Thank goodness the car is in a garage and no one can see me!

Karl

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