Jump to content

Rimmer Bros rotoflex to cv conversion


trigolf
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

Canley Classics have announced that they no longer stock, or will sell their CV drive shaft conversion, as the minimum order quantity required from their supplier would make it uneconomical etc. Having saved my pennies I was about to place an order before Xmas, when I read their announcement, which was a big disappointment !

I then noticed that Rimmer Bros sold an alternative solution, but broadly similar to Canleys' design - i.e. you still have to shim the bearings to achieve the correct end float. Jigsaw Racing also sell what I believe is exactly the same design, when comparing the pics. Not wishing to 'miss the boat' a second time I have ordered the Rimmer product, which appears to be well made and slightly more expensive than the Canley item. Does anyone have recent experience of fitting the Rimmer/Jigsaw product ?  Before I consider starting the project, I'm particularly interested in any problems encountered during/after the job. BTW I'm fully conversant with the end float shimming process, having replaced the bearings some years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do know that the Canley ones can have a clearance issue on the back of the VL, and I think the Rimmers ones may actually be the Canley type? I know Canleys sell a lot of stuff to Rimmers.

That is as much as I know, and is down to manufacturers tolerances (Stanparts, not Canleys). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are conversant with shimming, I would say that your biggest problem has already been dealt with.

I've gone for the Nick Jones conversion which does away with shimming.

Personal choice.

Regards.

Richard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clive, I've compared pics of the Canley item and the Rimmer/Jigsaw one and although Rimmer's seem to be using Canley's description/explanation - word for word  the product is not the same, unless Canley revised their specification later in the production run. The Rimmer item has a full length splined tip for the hub, whereas the Canley item is exactly the same design as the rotoflex outer axle - i.e. it has a plain shoulder after the splined  portion to fully support the hub around the inner bearing. I've got an old hub that I've tried on both CV shafts and it's a loose sliding fit on the splines. I intend to buy new hubs anyway which I presume would be a better fit on the new shafts ?

Pete, thanks for Club tip but I believe they sell the Rimmer item and it's the most expensive even with the Club discount !

Gav

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I fitted the jigsaw ones before the club shop stocked them. They are the same product. Went on like a dream, shimmed like a devil but that’s my inexperience. I did note that the inner boot clip rubs very slightly on the top of the chassis.

 

Adrian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 24/01/2018 at 7:04 PM, trigolf said:

Hi All,

Canley Classics have announced that they no longer stock, or will sell their CV drive shaft conversion, as the minimum order quantity required from their supplier would make it uneconomical etc. Having saved my pennies I was about to place an order before Xmas, when I read their announcement, which was a big disappointment !

I then noticed that Rimmer Bros sold an alternative solution, but broadly similar to Canleys' design - i.e. you still have to shim the bearings to achieve the correct end float. Jigsaw Racing also sell what I believe is exactly the same design, when comparing the pics. Not wishing to 'miss the boat' a second time I have ordered the Rimmer product, which appears to be well made and slightly more expensive than the Canley item. Does anyone have recent experience of fitting the Rimmer/Jigsaw product ?  Before I consider starting the project, I'm particularly interested in any problems encountered during/after the job. BTW I'm fully conversant with the end float shimming process, having replaced the bearings some years ago.

I’m doing exactly the same with the Jigsaw one. I would appreciate a quick summary of the end float measurement and shimming process which I regret I know nothing about. What is it and how do you go about it ?  Thanks for any help as always. Richard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There’s an earlier thread on this so worth looking up. The fundamentals are dry assembly and measure. Didn’t work right for me so I followed the trial and error gradually adding/removing 1 thou shims until there was a very, very slight play on the wheel when wobbled. The fundamentals are the end float prevents the tapered bearings from being over compressed when torquing the drive shaft in the hub. Something like that anyway. Hope that helps

 

Adrian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Adrian said:

I did note that the inner boot clip rubs very slightly on the top of the chassis.

Hello Adrian.

What type of clip is used ??

Thanks.

Richard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adrian, thanks for the info. It's useful to know that someone has completed the job without any major snags !

Richard, if you have no knowledge of setting up the bearing end float I suggest you have a look at a copy of the factory workshop manual, which explains the process, (available to download ) using special Churchill tools that were available to Main Triumph dealer workshops only. They are very rare - I've never even seen any of the tools - at autojumbles etc. There is an alternative method, that uses feeler gauges, described on the Canley Classics Website -  Technical Archive - under Rear End Noises - Item 4. If you feel that the job is beyond your capabilities I would suggest you hand the job over to a classic Triumph specialist, who must be fully conversant with the process and has done the job before. If the end float is set incorrectly then the bearings will not last and will wear out prematurely.

Gavin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, trigolf said:

Adrian, thanks for the info. It's useful to know that someone has completed the job without any major snags !

Richard, if you have no knowledge of setting up the bearing end float I suggest you have a look at a copy of the factory workshop manual, which explains the process, (available to download ) using special Churchill tools that were available to Main Triumph dealer workshops only. They are very rare - I've never even seen any of the tools - at autojumbles etc. There is an alternative method, that uses feeler gauges, described on the Canley Classics Website -  Technical Archive - under Rear End Noises - Item 4. If you feel that the job is beyond your capabilities I would suggest you hand the job over to a classic Triumph specialist, who must be fully conversant with the process and has done the job before. If the end float is set incorrectly then the bearings will not last and will wear out prematurely.

Gavin

Hi , I changed rear ujs, bearings, rotoflexes , polybush, on my Vitesse mk 2 last summer and used the canley system for bearing set up and can recommend this method . Make sure you have plenty and variety of shims. Allow plenty of time as it might take several attempts to achieve the correct tolerance. Don’t compromise and use a diy spring lifter. Initially I tried with a scaffolding pole with strapping but couldn’t get the spring high enough so borrowed one from Pete Lewis and have subsequently purchased one . The biggest job is reassembly and when you are at that stage more than happy to advise how I did it. I did ring Canleys for advice and they said it was the hardest job they have to do and it takes brute force and 2 people . I did manage on my own , though  the first one took an age .

Since the rebuild my Vitesse has done approx 1000 miles and so far so good 

Hope this helps

Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...