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Steering rack mounts , solid


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I did so on my cars 25 years ago, and always found them excellent. Mine were from Canleys....and the same ones are still fitted to my current car.

Some people seem to find they create harshness, but no idea why. The 6 or so cars I have had them on have all been fine, and I appreciate the lack of movement. The other option is polybush, but I have them on my Toledo, and they are not as firm as the solid mounts, still allowing a bit of movement. 

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5 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

some are thick enough to locate against the rack abutements  some are thinner  and  leave  a good gap and rely on the mounts gripping the rack tube 

to arrest any shift .

sorry  Know idea  who sell which 

Pete

Hi Pete. Canleys sell them

Paul

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My solid mounts allowed the rack to slide particularly when using a hard lock at slow speeds to pull away from a kerb.  Now have one solid mount and one rubber mount - a tip I read somewhere (maybe on here) and that has solved the rack movement problem.

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4 minutes ago, Qu1ckn1ck said:

My solid mounts allowed the rack to slide particularly when using a hard lock at slow speeds to pull away from a kerb.  Now have one solid mount and one rubber mount - a tip I read somewhere (maybe on here) and that has solved the rack movement problem.

Hi Quick. Where did you get your solid mounts from

Thanks

Paul

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46 minutes ago, Qu1ckn1ck said:

My solid mounts allowed the rack to slide particularly when using a hard lock at slow speeds to pull away from a kerb.  Now have one solid mount and one rubber mount - a tip I read somewhere (maybe on here) and that has solved the rack movement problem.

That's interesting, but I can't see how one solid and one rubber does anything positive - two solid mounts should grip the rack; if it slides then there's something not right. The alloy mounts were intended to remove the sloppy feel from worn rubber, which allowed movement. Any benefit from one rubber mount will be cancelled by the opposite solid mount which will still grip but will also allow vibration through the rack, while the rubber won't grip anywhere nearly as solidly as the alloy mount so will still allow a degree of rack movement - the only way it wont is if it's sufficiently wide to butt against the brackets on the rack, in which case it will stop movement in one direction only and you need the same on the other end to address both directions.

I'm actually going for poly mounts on my 1200 in place of the solid mountings solely for the reason of the nylon button on the rack, but haven't run rubber mountings on any of my cars in many years.

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1 hour ago, Paul H said:

Hi Quick. Where did you get your solid mounts from

Thanks

Paul

Bought them from Rimmer, part number RR1370, cost £23.33 + Vat in September 2016.  Made several attempts to stop the rack slipping before going for one solid and one rubber mounting which appears to have cured the problem.

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The original design on the 1959 Herald had solid rack mounts. Following the early motoring press reviews of the Herald, which stated vibration could be felt through the steering, the rubber insulated set-up was fitted in 1960.  The Herald was the first Standard Triumph to have rack and pinion steering and all the research work was then carried over onto all Triumphs models of the 1960's/70's/80's.

Dave   

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On 3/12/2018 at 5:08 PM, Pete Lewis said:

nylon plug,  part number  145108  

its common part on all the small chassis racks ,  stops rough ground rack rattle 

as said most ally  mounts allow this little sod to drop out , its held in by the rbber ones or the wide ally ones 

 

See Courier number 454.

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