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DerekS
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I stopped buying any of the current 'classic' magazines, this term 'modern' or 'future' classic seems to be an excuse for anything that's just straight out of the showroom, to bulk the magazines out and attract more readers. Somebody posted a few years ago that classic shows were becoming more like the car park at Tescos, and sadly the magazines are going the same way.

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Very true Colin.

For a number of years I did subscribe to CM but the modern touch was too frequent, switched back to PC and slighter more in line with true classic vehicle representation; although I am seeing a slight shift to more modern cars. Pity really.

Oddly enough, I purchased a copy of The Automobile last month to restore my faith in classic car literature and the fact it had an article of interest to me. Although an interesting read it is pitched to the vintage brigade.

Probably the only publication that tends to stick to classic vehicles and is actually an informative read is Classic Car Weekly; albeit a newspaper.

How I long for such mags as Car & Car Conversion to be rekindled - the depth of knowledge and know-how in that publication was quite extraordinary.

The interpretation of what is actually a classic vehicle appears to have become very foggy over the last few years and the Tesco analogy is very apt.

Regards.

Richard.

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I must admit that I don't tend to buy magazines - too many repeat the same things (I'm thinking more photography here where you can almost predict what will come next each month)

As for more modern cars becoming called Classics - I guess that is the result of time travel and its rate of a second per second :D - People call VW Golfs classics - but they were new when I was young - 80's cars just don't seem to be classics!

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4 hours ago, derekskill said:

I've just picked up the latest issue of Classics Monthly, up from £4:50 to £5:99...

Was it bundled with another magazine?

I’ve noticed that Sainsbury’s often stock CM packaged with another magazine, last month it was ‘Rolls Royce & Bentley’ owner!

If you buy it own it’s £4.50, bundled, it’s almost £6.00.

I now buy my copy from the local Spar.

Karl

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10 minutes ago, Anglefire said:

As for more modern cars becoming called Classics - I guess that is the result of time travel and its rate of a second per second :D - People call VW Golfs classics - but they were new when I was young - 80's cars just don't seem to be classics!

There has to be a limit; when you have THREE MONTH OLD cars on display at a Classic Show, which was so overcrowded that many genuinely old vehicles couldn't gain access, then there's something wrong. 

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10 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

There has to be a limit; when you have THREE MONTH OLD cars on display at a Classic Show, which was so overcrowded that many genuinely old vehicles couldn't gain access, then there's something wrong. 

Really? That's just mad - so yes something definitely wrong!

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I don't know. Something of real interest, like a decent Ferrari/Porche/Lambo has an appeal to most classic owners. And we do need to be careful. My first Triumph was a 1979 Dolomite, bought in 1986. And my first spit was a 1977, bought in 1989. So even the spit was only 12 years old. Translate and that becomes 2006 today. 

I think there are many cars that count, anything that is a sports car will always attract attention, we had an early MX5 for a few years, and just like a spitfire (except it was superbly reliable!) but a great car to drive. And remember, such cars are cheap enough that they are accessible to so many people.

What is diminishing is the old style "classic"shows, What is on teh up are the breakfast meetings, and as above, retro-cars and so on. We need to be careful we don't get left behind. The increases in prices seems great, and means some people will spend money restoring cars. The downside is the way the cars are being locked in garages and treated as investments. I know some of the Ford chaps won't take their cars to shows, for fear of a tracker being placed in the car so it can be traced and stolen. I don't think our cars are at the same values, and the parts can be easier to trace, but it means the cars are no longer a joy to own if you are scared to take it out.

As to Mk1 Gold GTi, no doubt they are a classic. They were the first of the hot hatches, and having owned a late one, can verify they are a superb car. And being the MK1, undoubtidly the best/purist of the breed. If you find a good one, buy it is my advice!

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My reference to the Golf was mearly that it does feel like a classic in respect of age - simply because I remember the 80’s well and doesn’t seem that long ago - the 70’s seem a long time ago. Possibly because I left school in 1981 - so that’s the start of my adult life and “Classics” are pre adulthood somehow. 

Undoubtably the golf gti mk1 is a classic in the true sense of the word - especially the ones with the Pirelli rims. To be fair I hadn’t realised it came out in 1974!  

But in the same breath im not sure a Ford Sierra will ever be a classic  ?

 

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19 hours ago, clive said:

I don't know. Something of real interest, like a decent Ferrari/Porche/Lambo has an appeal to most classic owners. And we do need to be careful. My first Triumph was a 1979 Dolomite, bought in 1986. And my first spit was a 1977, bought in 1989. So even the spit was only 12 years old. Translate and that becomes 2006 today. 

My first Spitfire was 17 years old when I bought it, so not old by today's standards. However many people are jumping on the 'Classic' bandwagon these days - I've seen modern Minis, Fiat 500s and Beetles on display at shows. A lot of the 'owners' clubs are the problem - they seem to allow any car with the same name to participate regardless of the age of the car. If you have a club like the MX5 Owners, their first cars are now 27 years old, but the most recent? I love some of the old-fashioned local shows, with tractors, static engines, and real fires baking genuine fresh soda bread; nobody brings a modern tractor, or has a B&Q petrol generator chugging away on display, so why on earth bring cars that aren't even due their first MOT?

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My first Triumph was a 1960 Herald 948 in 1965. Very modern! You could work on it, repair it and keep it on the road for not a lot of money.

I like to see what were the every day cars (pre war/1940/50/60/70) but not the modern's as you can see them any day of the week. The country fair type of event are great.

Dave

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20 hours ago, Anglefire said:

 

But in the same breath im not sure a Ford Sierra will ever be a classic  ?

 

Cosworth? as in the most successful BTCC cars ever? and of course the RS500?? They are again a modern classic. And again only a few years younger than the last of our cars. And the RS500 makes TR5's look reasonably priced!

But I appreciate the issue with "lifestyle" cars. However, as the number of car "enthusiasts" is diminishing, we need to embrace the brave new world. Besides, I think that people may start off buying a modern Mini, and some will then develop a hankering for an original one, Likewise the Fiat 500, though most of those seem to be driven by young ladies who want a pretty car (Molly, my youngest, wants one. But not as much as she wants an R8 or a Lambo)

And we do need to look around and see what is happening to the car scene. Just look at the way the Retro Rides type of show is rapidly growing, while the traditional shows are starting to disappear. We can all say how we like the old cars shows and so on, but the owners are literally dying off, not to mention many of the clubs where the organisers are all getting old and unable to attract young blood. No, I think we are going to have to move with the times and accept the change. It may be hard as things haven't really changed for years, but after the TSSC losing the ability to run a large show, and indeed many other clubs in the same position, it is becoming a take it or leave it situation.

I was disappointed the way things happened, but I am discovering new ways to enjoy my car. I am taking part in some pretty active tours (RBRR, 10CR) and venturing into some of the retro car shows. Yes, they are different, but it is great to see the enthusiasm that hundreds of people have for their cars. Even if some of said cars look as if they are about to self destruct because of the sheer volume the stereos can produce (I kid you not, bits were falling off an Escort, it was amusing!)

 

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Ok, Ok, the Cossie is a different kettle of fish. :D

Its perhaps that I think of the Sierra as the company car hack - which is not a classic in that sense - though I accept that all of the Capri's are classics - so little difference really.

Its just a case of perception I think. As I've said before, cars before 70's are classics in my eyes - but they are blinkered as anything over 25years can be reasonably considered a classic car I guess? 

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If someone had told me 25 years ago that Maxis, and Mk3 Cortinas would be considered classic, I would have laughed at them!

But time marches on, and so therefore does what constitutes a classic.

I know Sierras were the much derided rep mobile, but how often do you see one now. Sierras were the go to company car of the 80s, just as Cortinas and Landcrabs were in the 60s, both now accepted as classics.

Some cars are classic because they are motoring masterpieces, like Lambos, Porsches and Ferrari’s, while others become classic because of their rarity.

Therefore I think we have to view ‘classic’ as a broad term which encompasses a number of interpretations.

Karl

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On 3/24/2018 at 8:15 PM, Bordfunker said:

Therefore I think we have to view ‘classic’ as a broad term which encompasses a number of interpretations.

Karl

I'll agree with that; I like older cars because they capture an era; chrome, shiny paint, individual styling, and imperial measurements. When I go to a show it's to re-enter this era and see again the materials and styles - be they vynide, leather, chrome, bakelite, wood or rubber. It's escapism and nostalgia both in one - so any car, and I'll emphasise ANY car - can bring back so many memories. I will never say that any car isn't a potential Classic, as someone will remember their childhood or first job in one of them. It's not about Porsches, or Ferraris - these meant nothing to me as a child; neither did Formula racing, so nostalgic racing has no interest for me at all. It's the cars that I saw - and there were very few- in my local estates that bring back the memories.

So: when someone attends a show in a modern Eurobox, it's destroying my atmosphere, and remembrances, like an anachronism that has no right to be in the past. This term "future Classic" is a bit like saying "I'll be a pensioner in fifty years time so can I have a free bus pass now?" Wait your time, same as we all did, and some day your potential classic really will be a genuine nostalgia trip for someone.

Just not now, when it's only three months old and not even had its' first oil change yet. 

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Totally agree Colin. Of course things are age related so at 45 years old my childhood/teenager car wish list isn’t the same as some one who is 65 years old. However looking at 10 year old cars etc that are still found in the Tesco car park isn’t really what I want to see. 

Classic cars just purchased for investments are the real danger. My Spit just purchased came straight out of storage and has done 5k in 18 years and that’s a triumph. Interesting conversation with the storage owner on how many cars have never moved or even been seen by their owners. To me that’s really sad :unsure:

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