Jump to content

TWIDDLE DAY 2


Pete Lewis
 Share

Recommended Posts

Just in case you miss the new dated for our 2nd Twiddle day at HQ here's a new post 

Twiddle Day 2  is on  

location    club HQ   post code  LE16 9TF

map  https://goo.gl/maps/SHFHMr8o6Ho

Date time     10am  MAY 20TH  

SUBJECT WILL BE ADHOC  DEPENDS WHAT PROBLEMS ARRIVE 

WE WILL BRING SOME INTERESTING STUFF WITH US TO CHAT ABOUT 

THIS IS ALL ABOUT TWIDDLING ,  bright ideas  , ways of problem solving   SETTINGS SPECS , NOT REBUILDS OR MAJOR WORKS 

KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR ANY UPDATES ON HERE OR IN THE NEXT COURIER ISSUE

Bern will be manning the BBQ burgers etc at HQ rates so refreshments will be available at a small cost   (tba)

looking forward to a sunny chatty day out  

if youre wanting to attend please reply here  or drop club a email    info@tssc.org.uk

Pete and Ray 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I’m a novice so my suggestions would be low level stuff and may well be a repeat of the things covered in your first work shop. 

Carb servicing/rebuild. Operation and setting plus balancing. 

Checking valve clearances 

Vehicle servicing and key areas of wear I should keep an eye on. 

As you know I’m wanting to fit additional dials so obviously happy to use my car for that if you feel it’s an appropriate use of time. 

Grant 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oil pressure, absolutely, temperature too is easy to do,  but ammeters carry ALL the current, dodgy when it has to be brought to the dash back and out again.   Fuel pressure if on Pi, lambda if you're really keen.    I have a digital volt meter that plugs into a cigarette lighter socket, and provides USB charging as required.  V.handy for long trips!

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John,

I used to have a Smiths shunt ammeter, a high wattage very low resistor sits in battery line. The voltage across the resistor is proportional to the current going through it. All you need then is a suitably calibrated volt meter with a dial that says amps. Unfortunately my resistor gave up the ghost and Smiths no longer make the kit. Shame.  The voltmeter tell you the condition of your battery, the ammeter tells you the condition of you alternator.

Doug

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, dougbgt6 said:

Grant,

Dials! Now you're talking! Oil, ammeter, voltmeter, vacuum. You can never have too many worry gauges.

Doug

Doug. We need to talk Sir. 

Looking at oil temp and oil pressure and battery voltage. Looking at the Smiths Pilot gauges because they would all be matching full dials. 

Vacume gauges look cool but are they any practical use?

Doug are you willing to help me out on fitting? I’m confused by what adapters I need for starters. 

Grant 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, dougbgt6 said:

John,

I used to have a Smiths shunt ammeter, a high wattage very low resistor sits in battery line. The voltage across the resistor is proportional to the current going through it. All you need then is a suitably calibrated volt meter with a dial that says amps. Unfortunately my resistor gave up the ghost and Smiths no longer make the kit. Shame.  The voltmeter tell you the condition of your battery, the ammeter tells you the condition of you alternator.

Doug

That's a shame, Doug!  Surely you could  find something, say at CPC?  http://cpc.farnell.com/c/electronic-electrical-components/resistors

Or, Farnell's: http://uk.farnell.com/c/automation-process-control/panel-displays-instrumentation/current-shunts

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vac  gauges... well you can see the vac rise as younadvance the dizzy, maybe up to 23"hg  then  back it off to around 18/20 but you can use your ears to do that , then keeping a high vac when driving builds a good Mpg ,  but thats no fun either 

So they can be useful as a reference but not really much use , just another needle to wag  about

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pete,

My vacuum gauge is a thing of fascination and wonder to all uninitiated passengers in my car. Usual response is "What on earth is that?!!!" As well as setting the timing you can also use it to set the mixture.

 http://www.classic-cars-online.co.uk/Archive/vacuumgauge.html

John,

Shunt ammeters are available, but not Smiths. I have some old Smiths gauges and at some point I'll buy a shunt and cobble something together, but it's at the bottom of the "to do" list.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/0-100V-100A-Shunt-DC-Digital-Voltmeter-Ammeter-LED-Amp-Volt-Meter-12v-24v-car/171368601158?epid=1487426345&hash=item27e65d5646:g:~NIAAOSwrmdTqyr9

Grant,

Not quite sure what you mean by fittings? Do you mean how does it fit in the hole? There's a clamp that generally comes with them

oilpressure.PNG.a2f1974c7d48e8dba75f86d181b71441.PNG

 

Or do you mean what to mount them in?

cowl.PNG.2f23e2a6f40d37e65996a9bc71d0afe9.PNG

Here's some of mine, (looking a bit grubby!)

dials.PNG.dc9d982d3eac04d3d85a6bdb28fa1a3f.PNG

Doug

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doug

sorry I mean wiring and plumbing really. Be nice to see that in the flesh so I can relate to the advice already given. 

I.e stick that in their using that connection and wire to that etc etc :blink:

PS vacuum gauge looks cool and actually useful but does the Spit manifold require drilling in order to fit one ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...