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Rear wheel bearings


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What model ?

if it’s got rotoflex driveshafts then no puller required. 

If it’s non rotoflex then the proper puller is the only way to get the hubs off.  Any other puller or press will damage the hubs and possibly the shaft.

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So I’m replacing wheel bearings this week and having a quick read through the workshop manual, it’s states the use of four ‘special tools’ one of which is the hub puller. Nobody ever mentions any of the others. Do I need them or is there a common work around?

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The only other special tools I can think of are:

Tool for setting position of dust cap on the drive shaft - easy work around.... don't move the caps when you take it all apart

Tool for pulling the shaft from the bearing hub. I use an adapted scrap front hub for this, but I recon a big hammer is probably another work around. (or a slide hammer, or a generic puller)

 

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Assuming this is not rotaflex  you need the correct puller tomremove the hib flange it is very easy to distort these with adhoc pullers or even a press then youmhave tomreface the hub flange or risk wonk drum location amd distorstion when tightening wheel nuts

The proper puller seriously reduces this risk.

You should be able to drift  or press the shaft out of the trunion bearing hsg.  There is a refitting dimension which does very little Use the refiiting hub to pull the shaft and back plate into place by torquing the shaft nut,

when doing any work presserve the threaded end of the shaft from any gorilla tactics

Pete

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As Pete said, use the proper puller tool (Canley's sell a nice one: https://www.canleyclassics.com/miscellaneous-tools-and-paint/hub-pulling-tool), you might be able to find someone who can lend you one. The hubs are really tight on the taper...

Inspect the shaft carefully, the needle rollers are prone to damage the surface and leave galling marks (or I'm just unlucky). Personally, I'd only use decent  bearings, the needle roller bearing is a Torrington B-168 and the ball bearing is an RHP RLS8. This isn't a job you want to repeat too often...

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It's not a bad job Leon. I'd never done them on my 1500spit before but I bought the right puller, took my time, took lots of pictures and it went fine. Be careful about getting the oil seals the right way round though. My shafts needed changing because the last owner had put them in the wrong way round, the grease had been flung out, and the bearings had chewed the shaft up. I had to drive it nearly 200mls when I bought it and 10mls from home they gave way. 

There's lots of people on here who will help if you get stuck. 

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51 minutes ago, ShaunW said:

Be careful about getting the oil seals the right way round though. My shafts needed changing because the last owner had put them in the wrong way round, the grease had been flung out, and the bearings had chewed the shaft up.

Oil seals are "unexpected" on this design. The outer seal, by the "proper" bearing, goes in the "normal" way - lip toward the grease - because its job is to prevent that grease leaking into the drum (and causing your brakes not to work). The inner seal, by the needle rollers, goes with the lip away from the bearing because its job is to prevent water getting in. They do leak a bit of grease into the cap there and it's harmless... providing your maintenance schedule complies with the factory spec. You MUST grease the rear hubs at every service. Not much - just enough to replace what has leaked. The guide is "four pumps until it begins to appear on the shaft" - in other words stop once the intentionally leaky inner seal begins to weep.

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i borrowed the correct hub puller from a very kind local TSSC member and had it all apart today. The whole lot is going for sand blasting and powder coating(with the exception of any mated surfaces!) i do have one question, there appears to be some wear on the shaft where the needle roller bearing contacts but its just shiny is this expected?

leon 

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