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Electric Fuel pump


Paul H
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37 minutes ago, Anglefire said:

First question is why?

standard car I would say keep with mechanical as to fit electric you should also fit crash sensors/switch to turn off the pump should you stuff it. 

Hi Mark, I was watching a Skillshack video on MGB servicing the other day and with the "tick tick " of the pump then stopping when primed seemed a good idea - As to electrics Ive upgraded to a modern blade fuse box set up so wiring & fitting crash sensors shouldn't be too onerous. 

Paul 

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13 hours ago, Gully said:

I know a fair number of people do it, but it always seems to me to be an upgrade for the sake of it unless the plan is to run a triple carburettor or injection set up.

Gully

Hi Gully, I would like to investigate further though no plans for changing twin stroms. What pump would you recommend ?

Paul 

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11 hours ago, Paul H said:

Hi Gully, I would like to investigate further though no plans for changing twin stroms. What pump would you recommend ?

Paul 

I'm afraid you're asking the wrong person as it's not a change I'd make. I'm certain there are some threads on here where people have fitted them though - along with details of the necessary pressure regulators.

Gully

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The facet "cube" and red top type pumps a noisy things. I have had them on cars and find it irritating. Add to that they need a pressure regulator to get them down to 2psi (I actually ran my webers on 1psi, pressure is not an issue, flow/supplying enough fuel is, and 1psi was plenty enough for 150bhp)

If I was fitting a pump now? decide where you will put the pump. Most are "pusher" and need to be low and near the tank. Some are "pullers" and can be fitted in the engine bay.

Possibly the best pumps are the Huco, available as either push or pull type, and from people I know are very good quality. Also available in at least 2 pressure types.

If you fancy a cheaper alternative, the facet posiflow looks decent....not sure about as a puller though.

Don't entertain facet copy pumps......

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Paul,

I am soon to install one of these electric pumps on my Alpine :

http://www.webcon.co.uk/shopexd.asp?id=48

It is a nice bit of kit with the addition it does not need a regulator and it incorporates the correct fuel filter housing BEFORE the pump; these units are quiet and will deliver between 2.5 & 4.5 pressure which is ideal for your Stromberg's no matter how little or how much fuel is required. You can if you wish fit another fuel filter inline between the pump and carbs - some do.

I know of classic vehicle owners who have installed these units with various carbs not just Weber(s) and all have provided positive feedback having previously used Facet - read between the lines there.

As you can see from the link it comes complete with the fitting kit.

Being a pusher unit it needs to be installed closer to the tank.

Webcon prices are dear but you can pick them up on eBay, which I did, for approx. £50 all-in via Advanced Automotives.

Hope that assists ??

Regards.

Richard.

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Main advantage of using an electric pump is the opportunities it gives to reduce fuel vapourisation, modern fuels being much more prone to it.

The mechanical pump, bolted directly to the block is a particular hotspot and heat-induced cavitation in its valves will bring you to a spluttering halt. The factory standard block-hugging pipe work doesn't help either.

On our Spitfire project we used a Huco pusher type pump mounted at the base of the tank and ran the pipe work along the bulkhead. It works. No fuel problems, even sat in traffic in recent weeks!

We do have an inertia cut-off switch

Nick

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21 minutes ago, Nick Jones said:

We do have an inertia cut-off switch

Paul,

As Nick has pointed out, an inertia cut-off switch is a must and the items flagged by John are typical of what you require. Mine came from a Jag with the wiring block connector, as advised above, cost £10.

Most of the ICOS have 3x wires, the thinnest (usually in the middle) is for the warning light - which you will probably not bother fitting.

Regards.

Richard.

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1 hour ago, clive said:

I had the puller type one fitted to Spitty for 5 years with no problems before I went EfI  with cut out switch l would not fit any other type they are mostly to noisey and to high pressure for carbs only 1.5 to 2 p s i needed

Roger

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7 minutes ago, Ian Foster said:

I have a Huco puller on my GT6, for all the reasons Nick gives.

Has been excellent with no re-occurances of fuel vapourisation.

Ian F

Hi Ian thanks for input - Is the Huco noisy

Paul  

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Paul

I have it in the engine bay, bracketed off the front face of the n/s suspension turret, using existing bolts.

So I can't hear it at all above the engine noise, except for the tick-tick, gurgle-gurgle when you first switch on the ignition (or ign + aircraft style isolator switch in may case).

Ian F

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In our Spitfire, with pump in the boot, you'll here a couple of muted ticks when you turn the ignition on but nothing when the car is running/driving.

My Vitesse has a Bosch high pressure pump under the boot floor (fed from the tank drain) and that produces a high-pitched whine/buzz which is rather more intrusive.

Nick

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Indeed, if it works, why mess with it. However, many do have problems with vapourisation.

A number of factors can stack up, main ones being

- ambient temperatures, which affects under bonnet and fuel temperatures.

- traffic. Being stuck in traffic for long periods on a hot day is worst case scenario as it leads to high underbonnet temps.

- how much fuel in the tank. Low levels make cavitation in the pump more likely

- presence of a fuel filter between tank and pump, especially if dirty adds to losses and increases cavitation risk

- fuel type, specially how much ethanol. E5 has an effect. E10 (not much in U.K. so far) is worse.

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20 hours ago, 68vitesse said:

Run a Vitesse 2L Mk1 with original mechanical pump not been a problem in the current hot weather, out this morning temperature in high twenties, why change?.

Regards

Paul

Hi Paul - Im always  interested in making my Vitesse more reliable plus enjoy the playing - plan is to add electric pump plus keeping original set up in place with a switch over system if the electric pump fails - The electrics are  made the more simple as already upgraded to blade fuses with fuses to spare

Paul 

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Hello Paul,

I note your logic, but will that not make it more cumbersome with additional connections and cut off taps etc ?? The least number of connections is always good in my book.

Additionally and I am certainly not sure on this point but do mechanical fuel pumps need fuel going through them to lubricate such as the valves ?? The other benefit, although negligible, is that you save wear & tear on the camshaft actuating the fuel pump lever - it probably robs a tad of power as well.

Not saying the above is correct but just crossed my mind.

Additionally, when electric pumps ran points they could be problematic, but these days they are electronic and very reliable - most electric pump issues stem from initial poor wiring and lack of good earthing. 

Regards.

Richard.

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39 minutes ago, classiclife said:

Hello Paul,

I note your logic, but will that not make it more cumbersome with additional connections and cut off taps etc ?? The least number of connections is always good in my book.

Additionally and I am certainly not sure on this point but do mechanical fuel pumps need fuel going through them to lubricate such as the valves ?? The other benefit, although negligible, is that you save wear & tear on the camshaft actuating the fuel pump lever - it probably robs a tad of power as well.

Not saying the above is correct but just crossed my mind.

Additionally, when electric pumps ran points they could be problematic, but these days they are electronic and very reliable - most electric pump issues stem from initial poor wiring and lack of good earthing. 

Regards.

Richard.

Thanks Richard for your input - no decisions made yet and looks like if I proceed the manual pump would have to be removed. Appreciate your valued comments 

Paul 

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