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Rolling road test...


mark powell
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9 hours ago, rogerguzzi said:

Ps notice how it was always old men who drove the fastest locomotives!  

Because it took years to graduate from cleaner, to fireman, to driver, and then work your way up the links from shunting the yard, to local goods, to local passenger, to long distance freight, and if you were really good the top link driving expresses.

Progression was much slower in those days, so by the time you’d worked your way through all those roles, you’d be a middle aged man.

Karl

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As a 12yr old I have been there , my uncle was head of  motive power we had tours around a number of places . Wish I had taken more In as those days cant be replaced

Dont remember the engine on test it wasnt running just static but as an avid trainspotter must have been awe inspiring 

Pete

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Wow! amazing!  I never knew that there wa such a thing as a locomotove dynamometer.   I thought it was all done on-track 

 

But, and a big but, that enormous test building and enormous investment was post war, when it should have been obvious that the future was NOT steam.  Another bad political decision.

John

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Here in France 'they' have upped the tax on diesel fuel and are giving big handouts to people who buy electric cars in their move to get more environmentally friendly. Snag is all these wonderful electric cars are really nuclear powered cars as well over 70% of French electricity comes from nuclear power. Surely they ought to be promoting petrol & diesel rather than nuclear with all its problems and future decommissioning risks. I’m waiting for the ‘greens’ to start tagging the recharging points and putting ‘Nuclear Power’ warning stickers on electric cars. ☢️

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We (as in the group of companies I work for) are doing some work with a vehicle test company - Austrian I think - anyway a couple of them went over to Austria for a "talk" and they are pretty exasperated by the governments and their idea of green cars.

They are purely looking at the credentials of the car (Or vehicle) from motive power source to road. So no thought about manufacture of the motive power (So batteries) or the decommissioning of same. All politics and nothing to do with the environment. 

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26 minutes ago, Anglefire said:

All politics and nothing to do with the environment. 

All BRITISH politics and nothing to do with the environment. I had to laugh at the recent proclamations on emissions and the rise in global temperature - the UK immediately stepped in with a plan to lower emissions by whatever unrealistic date, and to penalise companies that don't address the issue.

Germany? We'll look at options.

America... well, we might.

China? We're a developing nation so it's not fair on us.

Brazil? We're a developing nation so it's not fair on us.

India? We're a developing nation so it's not fair on us.

France? Get stuffed.

Italy? Get stuffed.

Russia? Don't worry, we'll generate all the electricity and keep all the fumes over here, then cut off supplies and cripple your infrastructure periodically.

Poor old UK ends up penalising its' residents and businesses, with the result that they move elsewhere, to countries that don't give a damn really.

I DO get worried that in the (quite) near future, stocks of petrol are going to be limited to certain petrol stations that are heavily penalised for having it, it being so dangerous and pollutive, so that we may end up having to keep our own small stock at home, with all the legal ramifications that entails; including the possibility of being sued by pedestrians for making them inhale our fumes as we drive past. By 2040 we'll be the lepers of the road.

 

 

 

 

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25 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

. By 2040 we'll be the lepers of the road.

 

 

 

 

By then this leper might become more environmentally friendly and ‘green’. I could be pushing up the daisies and in this way paying back for the damage done driving my petrol & diesel personal mobility devices by being recycled.♻️

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3 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

All BRITISH politics and nothing to do with the environment. I had to laugh at the recent proclamations on emissions and the rise in global temperature - the UK immediately stepped in with a plan to lower emissions by whatever unrealistic date, and to penalise companies that don't address the issue.

Germany? We'll look at options.

America... well, we might.

China? We're a developing nation so it's not fair on us.

Brazil? We're a developing nation so it's not fair on us.

India? We're a developing nation so it's not fair on us.

France? Get stuffed.

Italy? Get stuffed.

Russia? Don't worry, we'll generate all the electricity and keep all the fumes over here, then cut off supplies and cripple your infrastructure periodically.

Poor old UK ends up penalising its' residents and businesses, with the result that they move elsewhere, to countries that don't give a damn really.

I DO get worried that in the (quite) near future, stocks of petrol are going to be limited to certain petrol stations that are heavily penalised for having it, it being so dangerous and pollutive, so that we may end up having to keep our own small stock at home, with all the legal ramifications that entails; including the possibility of being sued by pedestrians for making them inhale our fumes as we drive past. By 2040 we'll be the lepers of the road.

 

 

 

 

Colin, the European bit is exactly right - they make up the rules and either don't bother to implement them or just ignore them regardless. The UK on the other hand bides by the rules to the letter.

One I heard about, which may be hipocraful, is that we are required to put pollution sensors by motorways - and there is as specified distance they have to be mounted (Fair enough) but the Europeans mount them as far away as possible, and the UK as near as possible. Hence the 50mph limit on the M1 at almost anytime of the day or night due to "pollution" ?

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3 hours ago, Anglefire said:

Colin, the European bit is exactly right

Hence the 50mph limit on the M1 at almost anytime of the day or night due to "pollution" ?

It's from long experience, even if it was a bit stereotyped and tongue in cheek, but we always seem to jump to attention, shout 'Yes Sir!" and run off to imlement things immediately.... :)

Besides, I thought many of the motorway go-slows were caused by rubbernecking, in which case we'll all be penalised for rubber particles polluting other road users...

I'll be back on the M6 on Monday, and can't wait....

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On 25/10/2018 at 14:55, Chris A said:

Here in France 'they' have upped the tax on diesel fuel and are giving big handouts to people who buy electric cars in their move to get more environmentally friendly. Snag is all these wonderful electric cars are really nuclear powered cars as well over 70% of French electricity comes from nuclear power. Surely they ought to be promoting petrol & diesel rather than nuclear with all its problems and future decommissioning risks. I’m waiting for the ‘greens’ to start tagging the recharging points and putting ‘Nuclear Power’ warning stickers on electric cars. ☢️

Chris, I thought the problem in France now is that they never quite finish the nuclear reactors so they'd never quite start generating. At least it reduces the decommissioning costs if if never gets commissioned,

We have one as well being built (by the French obviously) so the British can also have the same problem in 10 years, and 15 years, and 20'years.... ?

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On 25/10/2018 at 09:58, JohnD said:

But, and a big but, that enormous test building and enormous investment was post war, when it should have been obvious that the future was NOT steam.  Another bad political decision.

John

BR was still building new steam locomotives until 1961, which meant that many of those scrapped in 68 were less than 10 years into a potential 30-40 year lifespan.

This was driven by a political desire to reduce costs while modernising the railways, which meant hundreds of poorly designed and built diesel locomotives being rushed into service, only to be scrapped as non-standard in the early 70s.

Another great example of political meddling in transport. A knee jerk response to public perception which failed to take the long term view.

Nobody ever seems to take into account the pollution caused during the manufacturing cycle of a car, which if memory serves accounts for over 20% of the pollution produced in a vehicles lifetime.

Which suggests we ought to aim to keep cars on the road longer, rather rushing to simply dispose of them after a decade or less.

Hang on!

We’re already doing that, so definitely being green!

Karl

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1 hour ago, thescrapman said:

Chris, I thought the problem in France now is that they never quite finish the nuclear reactors so they'd never quite start generating. At least it reduces the decommissioning costs if if never gets commissioned,

We have one as well being built (by the French obviously) so the British can also have the same problem in 10 years, and 15 years, and 20'years.... ?

It's quite the opposite. A nuclear power station opened in 1978 that the government in 2017 decided to close in 2019 will now cary on running, I bet part of the decision is due to the problems of the decommissioning and waste disposal. Some years ago nuclear was seen as the clean way to generate electricity rather than dirty coal. In a few years when there are stocks of old power cells from electric cars that nobody knows how the recycle them what will be the clean fuel? Steam? After all it is only water . ..?

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Except gas turbine power stations, every one, be it coal, wood, or nuke, generate steam to turn the turbines to generate the power.

And once the useful life of battery cells for cars has been used up, they can be used in battery farms.  But ultimately they have to be recycled............

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11 hours ago, Chris A said:

Some years ago nuclear was seen as the clean way to generate electricity ...

It was seen as the way to make plutonium for our weapons programme. It's no surprise that the first five nations with nuclear power were the first five in the nuclear (weapons) club.

There IS a nuclear technology which, although it has never been fully developed, answers most of the gripes people have about uranium reactors. The Americans even had a reactor running at one of their universities in the 60's and 70's - a small one, just a few megawatts - they used to switch it off on Friday afternoons and switch it back on on Monday. Only one problem - and it's a BIGGIE! - it did NOT create plutonium as a bi-product. The Chinese and Indians have started throwing big money at this technology, but we in the west won't because we have a vested interest in the Uranium. Try putting "molten salt thorium" into your favourite search engine.

Cheers, Richard

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