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A day for inspiration


JohnD
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When all is falling apart, stand and say to yourself:

"This day is call'd the feast of Crispian.
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when this day is nam'd,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say "To-morrow is Saint Crispian."
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
And say "These wounds I had on Crispin's day."
Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember, with advantages,
What feats he did that day. 

This day is called the Feast of Crispian.  Happy Crispin's Day.

John

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1 hour ago, dougbgt6 said:

I thought there was something about holding your manhood on Saint Crispian's day?

db

Yes! YES!! YES!!!  It does, but even a small dose of the Crispin's Day speech is a spine stiffener.

You want the rest? 

This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
 

I have it by heart, and it does me good.   Do not read it silently,  read it aloud, read it to your children, but whatever you do, read and learn it.

John

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John, you learnt this speech when you played King Henry V on stage? I do hope so. I have this vision of you astride a horse (with dark green armour and a contrasting light green noseband) leading a band of cheering medical students, scalpels in hand, to noble deeds at Agincourt. Or perhaps just at the local Bistro....

 

Adrian

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On 25/10/2018 at 19:16, JohnD said:

Yes! YES!! YES!!!  It does, but even a small dose of the Crispin's Day speech is a spine stiffener.

You want the rest? 

This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd—
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
 

I have it by heart, and it does me good.   Do not read it silently,  read it aloud, read it to your children, but whatever you do, read and learn it.

John

Does the heart good, doesn't it? Kenneth Branagh's film version is excellent

Sadly, a newspaper recently quoted Shakespeare as too "male and pale" and therefore no longer suitable for teaching in today's multiculchural schools.

They'd rather read about Nelson the Terrorist. (Not the guy with the column, the other guy.)

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