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Brake Fluid


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I want to change the brake fluid in the vitesse, I dont know whether its currently on DOT4, DOT5 or silicone. I know I need to replace all of the fluid but Im assuming that the various brake fluid options are all compatible, how do I clean the system to prevent contamination?

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Dot   3  , 4 and 5.1 are all compatible amd made of a semi clear brown gold oily looking fluid

Dot 5 is a silicon material its not mixable with the others and visually a bright dense colour 

If you have 3 ,4 or 5.1 then a flush through with new fluid is fine,  use dot 4 is standard  just pump till new clear appears in your carch bottle  when bleeding have a long tube and have the catch bottle up higher than the wheels , this stops air running back in the nipple threads  

Theres some good clues on https://www.buckeyetriumphs.org/brakes

But i cant open it on my tablet thingy.

Pete

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What Pete said + Silicone is often coloured purple and doesn't need changing, that's one of the reasons for having it. :lol: Silicone and the others don't mix, in fact when you change to silicone you just pour it in and bled the brakes until the fluid comes out purple. 

Doug

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Well the fluid isn't a purple colour, its a brownish colour, no idea how old it is so want to replace so I know. I'm going to trawl through the bills I was given to see if that clarifies what fluids are in the car.

Is it worth a change to silicone?

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If your fluid has gone brownish, this points to mineral brake fluid rather than silicone.

Silicone brake fluid tends to hold its purple colour as it is not affected by moisture, whereas mineral is.

Various classic car owners have different views and is certainly a topic that is debated on this Forum on a regular basis.

I'm not going in to the pro's and cons of each OR what the best accepted method of conversion is if you do decide silicone.

I've run classics on both and have not experienced any great degree of difference.

The benefits of silicone is that it does not absorb moisture and certainly does not spoil paintwork if contact is made.

Mineral should be changed every coupe of years whereas silicone has a far greater shelf life.

Regards.

Richard. 

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Thanks, I think Ive made my mind up from a quick search, it wont be silicone as Im not intending to rebuild / replace the brake system components at this stage.

I found an invoice thats 3 years old and its stated as 'Castrol' brake fluid - Im assuming that this is not a silicone based product

 

 

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Do NOT put mineral oil in the brake system. This will kill the seals very quickly.

Dot 3, 4 & 5.1 is a polyethylene Glycol blend (Synthetic)

Dot 5 is a silicone fluid.

Dot 5 (Silicone) does not mix with water BUT water can still get into the system. It will/may settle in low sump areas and cause corrosion possibly.

2 or 3 year replacement is worth thinking about.

Automec suggest that you can drain DOT 4 and replace with DOT 5 with no flushing - utter madness.

DOT 5 does damage paint work - trying touch-up painting after contamination.

There is no miracle fluid.

Modern car manufacturers do not use DOT 5 because it does not work well with ABS systems.

DOT 5 was created for long term preservation/storage so was mummification but we won;t go there.

Roger

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42 minutes ago, RogerH said:

Do NOT put mineral oil in the brake system. This will kill the seals very quickly.

Dot 3, 4 & 5.1 is a polyethylene Glycol blend (Synthetic)

Dot 5 is a silicone fluid.

Dot 5 (Silicone) does not mix with water BUT water can still get into the system. It will/may settle in low sump areas and cause corrosion possibly.

2 or 3 year replacement is worth thinking about.

Automec suggest that you can drain DOT 4 and replace with DOT 5 with no flushing - utter madness.

DOT 5 does damage paint work - trying touch-up painting after contamination.

There is no miracle fluid.

Modern car manufacturers do not use DOT 5 because it does not work well with ABS systems.

DOT 5 was created for long term preservation/storage so was mummification but we won;t go there.

Roger

I have used silicone brake fluid for years without problems and would believe Auromec on the basis of liability.

Silicone brake fluid does not affect paint, any oil, wax or silicone containing product will affect paint repairs if not properly cleaned, anti fisheye products are available.

Once sprayed part of my car with silicone brake fluid, removed the air supply to a Gunson Eezebled, not noticing that the bottle had fallen over, cleaned up no damage.

Our cars do not have ABS unless somebody has added it, never heard of it being done.

Regards

Paul

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2 hours ago, 68vitesse said:

Our cars do not have ABS unless somebody has added it, never heard of it being done.

Regards

Paul

Hi Paul,

     my comment about modern cars not using DOT 5 was because many people say if DOT5 is so good why do the moderns not have it.

DOT 5 is no good with ABS.

Nothing to do with aged cars.

 

The battle goes on !!!!!

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

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Hi Peter,

 silicone based fluid was developed for the US Army with the main role for long term storage.

The idea was that after 10, 18 or more years they can be rolled out with no maintenance on the brakes. (shouldn't go rusty as there is no water in the system).

At some stage it was tested and registered  with a DOT number.

Prior to this the brake system would be drained or inhibitor inserted.

Before ABS the car manufacturers didn;t use DOT5 because of the cost. They don;t use it now as DOT 5 and ABS do not work together.  

 

Roger

 

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Hi,

" Silicon brake fluid readily traps air and is not to be used with ABS systems." From the internet. I do not know of any Triumphs with ABS.

My Clutch runs DOT 5 with no problems.

My brakes ran DOT 4 with no problems. They did run DOT 5 with no problems but Mr GT decided it was bad and changed it to DOT 4 while upgrading front callipers. Around 6 years ago.

Now my rear slave has died. Age I believe. Not helped by Yorkshire Triumph adjusting the rear shoes so they generated an abundance of heat when I left their garage. Shhmoking!

Once brakes are all sorted. DOT 5 is my choice.

Cheers,

Iain.

 

 

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From my own experience of using silicon for over 25 years I haven't had any problems. As already said it is less aggressive than the mineral stuff and does not absorb moister. The latter being important if you lay your Triumph up over the winter months. e.g. cylinders seizing up.  If you used the mineral stuff then change it every 2 or  3 years, but don't get any on the paintwork when you are doing it.

The only ABS on my Triumphs is my foot!

The mineral v silicon bounces around Triumph forums somewhat like grease or oil in trunnions.

Just my thoughts.

Dave

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Found this which I think is well explained:

http://www.mossmotoring.com/conventional-vs-silicone-brake-fluid/

Or to paraphrase:

Silicone works well for virtually all cars (excluding ABS and race cars)

The system needs to be carefully flushed through to remove all traces of old fluids and contamination

All brake/hydraulic seals should be replaced every few years (something few of us actually do) But I still think replacing all the seals if changing to silicone is a very wise thing to do, helps sort any potential issues out

 

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