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That was a year that was..


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I asked about the model specific (TR4A, TR250, & TR5) side marker lamps on the TR register and my query seems to have stumped everyone. Perhaps the historically learned or simply smart of the TSSC can shed some light . .

Had they been a detail of a 1920's or 30's car such as the Triumph Gloria ..with its winged bonnet mascot, they might have been in keeping so to speak.

image5.jpg.958aebffbc7c6dda08bb1ac323a83312.jpg

But, to be perfectly honest.. they appear a design incongruity for either Triumph, Michelotti, or any sports car.  The Italia of 1960's for example had very simple round side repeaters that wouldn't look out of place on a 21st century car.  Similarly these wouln't sit well with the hippie fashions of the mid-1960's or to any obvious contemporary style ..whether in line with Triumph's saloon-car range, or as a response to a similar feature of a competitive marque.

They are indifferent to any other design feature on these model of car, or to their badges.  And If I look to mid-60's American influence, for example the Shelby Mustang, a Cobra, a GTO, or Corvette, I don't even see side-marker / repeater-lamps.  With no precedent for their being legally required, nor their flamboyance being a style sought in the US .. just how did they get passed Triumph's bean-counters ? 

Michelotti (fairly representative of the Italian styles) was pushing smooth graceful curves with little or no adornment. Triumph's Fury concept of 1964 reflected the Italian 'influence'. Very much more Ferrari than harking back to the wings of Hermes.

  Fury.thumb.jpg.b242fcf463c8ae5542cca5a46e343c67.jpg

I'm not objecting to them, but they are undoubtedly an interesting objet d'art.  And to me at least - a mystery. 

So I'm simply wondering if there is an interesting story behind their design and adoption.?   

.

And did Triumph then try to disguise them ?

Tr250.thumb.jpg.11cfd0f60fe19059ea2234f5a0ee1e42.jpg

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Yes I see what you each mean regarding their marketing / perceived added-value purpose,  I was more curious about their style not being in keeping with ..anything.! ?  

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Yee ha !

We collected Katie on Monday (8th) and I'm really very pleased. Drove back open-topped, a little chilly but not nearly as bad as I had expected, indeed very tolerable. Conversely the steering wheel shake at 60mph is intolerable, as is the heaviness of this clutch    ..but I'm sure I'll soon have those sorted. :rolleyes:

On the way back from Bury I was compelled to turn off the A14 and stop, as the temp gauge pushed close to the red. But as soon the car slowed - the gauge went back down to a more normal reading. Yes plenty of water in the radiator, and that was hot but not scolding or spurting. Squeezing the top hose however indicated it was empty. The engine hadn't been pinking or rattling from being overheated so, because we had just another 12 miles to go and the weather was cool, we set off again.

Back on the road - the temp went up to the red line, and so just two junctions further on, we stopped again ..and I removed the thermostat. That's temporarily sorted out that issue. Huh !  :))


Once I write it down - I'll have a 'snag list' the length of my arm, but for the most part they are minor tasks..so I feel I've a really great base to start from. I'm going to have fun with this car :)))))

.. I'm so grateful to Bob for holding it for me until I could manage to get me piggy bank open.   ..most urgent job I think will be to remove the seat-belt's inertia reel from the floor, which stops the seat going back. Then I can take my legs with me when I go out.

In the meantime Bob is going to look at a cream coloured TR7 for sale down in Essex.

Pete.
291318185_phone211019.jpg.089fab50cc7f6f52d98998c7521b3774.jpg
^ Katie's restorer and now prior  custodian Bob Bell and his dearest little lady Pat just before I headed off.

1444667576_phone211021.jpg.8714d6a650743222ac4ca695d5da64a7.jpg

^ Arrived safe n' sound, to the most salubrious* 'Woodland Manor'. 

My apologies that I have no fuel station photo.. I was otherwise preoccupied with the temperature gauge bending its needle !

..  and a couple of photos taken for insurance valuation purposes. . .

1598390845_phone211026.jpg.ea62704d2407820577bead903e693b1a.jpg

1891467929_phone211024.jpg.6114ed123d5ab0aa8173d4209ded0bd7.jpg

 

230469204_phone211030.jpg.ff9730248e23cb0783a67720fb18042e.jpg

Bidding you a very good day.

Pete.

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What a beautiful sunny day yesterday was . .

..I drove MY NEW  TR  :P  across to my container to tackle the first couple of jobs. (it's the only place I have to work on the car at the moment ..but it's a dust bowl there)

1973473133_2021-03-09TR002s.jpg.62f903a936e5867b7beb086a0166271f.jpg

Job 1. Getting the seat to move back, at least as far as the wheelarch. . .

1071601797_2021-03-09TR003as.thumb.jpg.5d724d0ca310c73eaa48de7d18f8bf3e.jpg

^ The issue here was mainly the location of the seat belt's inertia reel, which stopped the seat moving back by about 2 1/2".

  401411204_2021-03-09TR014s.jpg.7e7b834ab3674efad9a0f40dee1dc169.jpg

^ I drilled a tight hole through the inner mudguard, and fitted a big backing plate under there (suitably paint protected). I happened to have a nut to fit onto the seat belt bolt, and another for bolting the belts tail-end back into the sill.  Aside from the fact that the seat belt is too long too retract all the way into the reel - it now works well with smooth tension, whereas as before it was snagging and wouldn't recoil.  I'll sometime fit something to stop the buckle from sliding down the webbing.

The pads on the carpet are because the driver's seat backrest is slightly more inclined than the passenger's, so 9mm reinforced rubber packing tilted the seat forward a little. But that proved uncomfortable with the backrests tubular seat frame pushing into my back ..so I took those out again on the (long) way home. 

Moving the inertia reel out of the way only partly worked because . . .

1938722792_2021-03-09TR004s.jpg.d63acdd0c17eb9fefb7b6281e99814ab.jpg

The inner seat belt mounting is on an angle bracket, and with both the seat belt's eye and the bolt's tread each facing towards the seat (which over time had chewed up the seats fabric) the seat couldn't push back passed this point.   That then had to be redone.

2131940978_2021-03-09TR007s.jpg.a3f7ae15aa82308e1f89c4272a0027ac.jpg

^ Job done and now the seat goes all the way, for its back to rest against the inner wheel arch. The seat runners themselves didn't need adjusting nor redrilling.

548938405_2021-03-09TR008s.jpg.33239563610d160bb34d7ef0e7855995.jpg

^ I don't think that seat will go much further back !  I did consider 'easing'  the inner mudguard back, ie., indent it with a softwood block and lump hammer, but as you can see that would not just be a very localised indentation ..and there's no point because . . .

1025949534_2021-03-09TR012s.jpg.fe808ee9eb35387c48f22261e5a1ca01.jpg

^ with the seat right the way back - the folded hood frame is already poking into the driver's shoulder. And that discomfort would only be more pronounced if I sat further back.  Remind me not to wear a nice jacket without having the hood frame's cover on.  These hood frame joints are hard edged and presently dry, but once lubricated they would certainly mark a sleeve. 

My friend, Rich, has advised that this is a TR6 hood frame and so perhaps the above width issue is not normally an issue with a TR4A hood frame.?  Having said that the seat backs are very  tapered up their outside backrest bolster.

Anyway, SUCCESS  insomuch as I now have another 2"  to 2-1/2" of leg room length and arm length to the wheel.  Now I can get my leg down low enough under the steering wheel to take my foot off the clutch.  For the drive home yesterday I pulled my leg out sideways to rest against the gear lever, so that I could steer the car !   I'm sure this seat position will be easier for around roundabouts and corners when I also wish to change gear. 

- - -

Job 2.  was to make getting in and out of the car easier.  The issue here was that the driver's door didn't open fully, so getting my size 13 brogues up inbetween the sill and the part-closed door was not at all easy. The cause of that was something to do with the check strap.

I didn't know how to take the check strap out, but thankfully the phone sees where I cannot (watch out big brother is watching ! ) . . .

1295205801_2021-03-09TR016s.thumb.jpg.0db3c9818345581e6f4e2beb26607bb5.jpg

^ Having removed the carpet, over the lower A-post, and from the photo I could see that there was nothing holding the check strap in place, but its guides and the shut.  I thought the rubber bump stop on its end looked too big, and that was causing the check strap to be too short.  So I removed the check strap's pin, from the front end of the door, and pushed the check strap out through the A-post's square hole. I removed the rubber bump-stop pad, and tried it again but the door still wasn't opening nearly far as it might.  So after securing the door from swinging too far forward and buckling itself against the front wing, I measured what extra length was needed, with the rubber bump-stop back in place . . .

1765666152_2021-03-09TR018as.jpg.2cb11fed6f556a2947eaf0b13bcf75c6.jpg

The rope used to hold the door from swinging too far forward.  Disclaimer : do not drive the car like this ! :lol:

1253406541_2021-03-09TR021s.jpg.864c63a6ddfbe1010a37983bc42c3577.jpg

^ check strap extended. This in turn was drilled for the pin, to lengthen the check strap by another 15mm. Then of course I cut the length off and rounded its end, painted it and refitted. 

1701053261_2021-03-09TR022s.jpg.6a87b4325b17f5b10b1ca09c60bd4e07.jpg

Task complete, aside from refitting the carpeted trim inside.

260881149_2021-03-09TR023s.thumb.jpg.bd58db1a094cebe739311f085db4dfcd.jpg

^ with the driver's door being pulled against the check strap - the door to wing clearance is still safe, but now the door opens another 15 or 20 degrees, which of course makes my getting in and out somewhat easier..  Perhaps the check strap's length is different between the TR4 and the TR6, and the wrong one was fitted.? 

4 hours work in total, so I was glad not to be paying a professional rate, but they were very necessary tasks for me to simply be able to get in and drive the car.! 

It was also very pleasant working out in the sunshine.

Pete.

 

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6 hours ago, Bfg said:

 

What a beautiful sunny day yesterday was . .

..I drove MY NEW  TR  :P  across to my container to tackle the first couple of jobs. (it's the only place I have to work on the car at the moment ..but it's a dust bowl there)

1973473133_2021-03-09TR002s.jpg.62f903a936e5867b7beb086a0166271f.jpg

Job 1. Getting the seat to move back, at least as far as the wheelarch. . .

1071601797_2021-03-09TR003as.thumb.jpg.5d724d0ca310c73eaa48de7d18f8bf3e.jpg

^ The issue here was mainly the location of the seat belt's inertia reel, which stopped the seat moving back by about 2 1/2".

  401411204_2021-03-09TR014s.jpg.7e7b834ab3674efad9a0f40dee1dc169.jpg

^ I drilled a tight hole through the inner mudguard, and fitted a big backing plate under there (suitably paint protected). I happened to have a nut to fit onto the seat belt bolt, and another for bolting the belts tail-end back into the sill.  Aside from the fact that the seat belt is too long too retract all the way into the reel - it now works well with smooth tension, whereas as before it was snagging and wouldn't recoil.  I'll sometime fit something to stop the buckle from sliding down the webbing.

The pads on the carpet are because the driver's seat backrest is slightly more inclined than the passenger's, so 9mm reinforced rubber packing tilted the seat forward a little. But that proved uncomfortable with the backrests tubular seat frame pushing into my back ..so I took those out again on the (long) way home. 

Moving the inertia reel out of the way only partly worked because . . .

1938722792_2021-03-09TR004s.jpg.d63acdd0c17eb9fefb7b6281e99814ab.jpg

The inner seat belt mounting is on an angle bracket, and with both the seat belt's eye and the bolt's tread each facing towards the seat (which over time had chewed up the seats fabric) the seat couldn't push back passed this point.   That then had to be redone.

2131940978_2021-03-09TR007s.jpg.a3f7ae15aa82308e1f89c4272a0027ac.jpg

^ Job done and now the seat goes all the way, for its back to rest against the inner wheel arch. The seat runners themselves didn't need adjusting nor redrilling.

548938405_2021-03-09TR008s.jpg.33239563610d160bb34d7ef0e7855995.jpg

^ I don't think that seat will go much further back !  I did consider 'easing'  the inner mudguard back, ie., indent it with a softwood block and lump hammer, but as you can see that would not just be a very localised indentation ..and there's no point because . . .

1025949534_2021-03-09TR012s.jpg.fe808ee9eb35387c48f22261e5a1ca01.jpg

^ with the seat right the way back - the folded hood frame is already poking into the driver's shoulder. And that discomfort would only be more pronounced if I sat further back.  Remind me not to wear a nice jacket without having the hood frame's cover on.  These hood frame joints are hard edged and presently dry, but once lubricated they would certainly mark a sleeve. 

My friend, Rich, has advised that this is a TR6 hood frame and so perhaps the above width issue is not normally an issue with a TR4A hood frame.?  Having said that the seat backs are very  tapered up their outside backrest bolster.

Anyway, SUCCESS  insomuch as I now have another 2"  to 2-1/2" of leg room length and arm length to the wheel.  Now I can get my leg down low enough under the steering wheel to take my foot off the clutch.  For the drive home yesterday I pulled my leg out sideways to rest against the gear lever, so that I could steer the car !   I'm sure this seat position will be easier for around roundabouts and corners when I also wish to change gear. 

- - -

Job 2.  was to make getting in and out of the car easier.  The issue here was that the driver's door didn't open fully, so getting my size 13 brogues up inbetween the sill and the part-closed door was not at all easy. The cause of that was something to do with the check strap.

I didn't know how to take the check strap out, but thankfully the phone sees where I cannot (watch out big brother is watching ! ) . . .

1295205801_2021-03-09TR016s.thumb.jpg.0db3c9818345581e6f4e2beb26607bb5.jpg

^ Having removed the carpet, over the lower A-post, and from the photo I could see that there was nothing holding the check strap in place, but its guides and the shut.  I thought the rubber bump stop on its end looked too big, and that was causing the check strap to be too short.  So I removed the check strap's pin, from the front end of the door, and pushed the check strap out through the A-post's square hole. I removed the rubber bump-stop pad, and tried it again but the door still wasn't opening nearly far as it might.  So after securing the door from swinging too far forward and buckling itself against the front wing, I measured what extra length was needed, with the rubber bump-stop back in place . . .

1765666152_2021-03-09TR018as.jpg.2cb11fed6f556a2947eaf0b13bcf75c6.jpg

The rope used to hold the door from swinging too far forward.  Disclaimer : do not drive the car like this ! :lol:

1253406541_2021-03-09TR021s.jpg.864c63a6ddfbe1010a37983bc42c3577.jpg

^ check strap extended. This in turn was drilled for the pin, to lengthen the check strap by another 15mm. Then of course I cut the length off and rounded its end, painted it and refitted. 

1701053261_2021-03-09TR022s.jpg.6a87b4325b17f5b10b1ca09c60bd4e07.jpg

Task complete, aside from refitting the carpeted trim inside.

260881149_2021-03-09TR023s.thumb.jpg.bd58db1a094cebe739311f085db4dfcd.jpg

^ with the driver's door being pulled against the check strap - the door to wing clearance is still safe, but now the door opens another 15 or 20 degrees, which of course makes my getting in and out somewhat easier..  Perhaps the check strap's length is different between the TR4 and the TR6, and the wrong one was fitted.? 

4 hours work in total, so I was glad not to be paying a professional rate, but they were very necessary tasks for me to simply be able to get in and drive the car.! 

It was also very pleasant working out in the sunshine.

Pete.

 

Good on you Pete, you got what you have been waiting for. :) Really pleased for you my friend.

Tony.

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Was discussing on the TR forum that my priority is to next address this car's extraordinarily heavy clutch action. 

To share what I had..  I photographed what can be seen ..the master & the slave cylinder and their assembly (if you're interested, I can share those with you here ?), and the outcome of that is that, just now, it's been suggested that the pin securing the clutch release fork has failed, or is failing. The fork swiveling around the shaft would account for the symptoms of its action being very heavy indeed and also only releasing during the last inch of lever travel before the bulkhead.  

In short ; it means the gearbox has to come out of the car.  As they say in the boating world..  Rowlocks !

I've booked the car in, a week on Thursday (subject to space availability), to tackle this.  In the meantime I'll do my homework and shop to get the bits in stock.  And I'll also consider what other jobs might be tackled while the gearbox is out.

Pete.

 

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30 minutes ago, Bfg said:

I've booked the car in, a week on Thursday (subject to space availability), to tackle this.  In the meantime I'll do my homework and shop to get the bits in stock.  And I'll also consider what other jobs might be tackled while the gearbox is out.

Pete.

 

Awwwwwww...no.... the slippery slope.  "It'll be off the road for a day or two." Famous last words... :)

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Pete, I mean the to say in the email, I wonder if the pin has snapped, you can get a clue by angles of the lever, and if you pop the slavecylinder actuatir rod out so you can move shaft by hand, if pin has broken it may have a notchy action as you push back and forth, rather than a solid stop a time each extremity.

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Pete, shopping list

new pin (obviously!!) you can different versions. Oversize and hardened amongst them

2 new cross shaft bearings, just add them to existing ones, or get the wider version from Chris Witor.

Spare cross shaft just in case you need to get Mr Grinder out

spare fork in case Mr Grinder comes back for a second visit.

replacement bushes for the fork. Might be round or square.

spare bearing carrier in case yours is worn ( likely if it has round fork bushes, less likely if square from a later gearbox. )

You could also do the extra roll pin mod to the carrier

New clutch kit

Change of gearbox oil.

whilst apart drill a hole in bottom of fork hole so you can drift out the next broken pin more easily.

you could go for the second bolt at 90 degrees if you want to go the whole hog.

Is now the time to fit a better tunnel if yours is a selection of bits of cardboard taped together.

Colin

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Brilliant Colin, Thank you..  invaluable help to me at this conjuncture.

Regarding your first ..  I thought I had felt the clutch pedal movement to be coarse, as if the edge of one lever or slider was grating against another.  However, when I drove the car yesterday that was not apparent. Instead I was more aware of the weight of force needed and then also that the pedal travel was so close to the bulkhead before the clutch released, which I had not really noticed during our collection trip. 

But these were only the brief impressions of someone who was, for the first time, driving his own  1960's sports car (which relative to my Chrysler Voyager its great fun but oddball ! ).  I nurturing a trapped nerve under my knee cap and could barely get into the car, and then not even straighten my legs - to use the clutch pedal in a straight push. The drive was for a total of perhaps an hour ..when my mind was distracted by little things like ; avoiding over-boiling and seizing the engine, so that included two stops due to over heating and my removing the thermostat.

And then the following day ; just a few miles drive, mostly along unclassified (wobbly) country lanes to the container, where my focus was more on wanting needing to adjust the driving position. And then the drive back home again (albeit the long way around of perhaps ten miles on b-classified country roads) when I enjoyed a straighter leg position, so the push onto the clutch pedal was from a different attitude.  By this time I was enjoying the drive ;)

However those impression do sort of tie-in with your "notchy action", and if it has just happened - then the change of angle of the fork end would be felt as the pedal getting closer to the bulkhead. 

Here are the photos I posted on the TR forum, and it was the angle of the actuating arm from the gearbox that led Stuart to propose that the clutch release fork's pin had, or was, going.

. . .

" piccies taken in the drizzling rain . .

608335239_2021-03-10TR-Clutchbonnetbuffers001as.jpg.ef8159076874c501af1193bc57343ac6.jpg

There's a spring dangling which I guess might have been a return spring on the clutch pedal (?). It's loop at the bottom is broken off. 

1744729563_2021-03-10TR-Clutchbonnetbuffers008s.jpg.70c7d3d532fb415e5688b30f878e4ad3.jpg

The clutch master cylinder looks to be 3/4" (spotted by Rich) according to the cast into the reservoir's side). I haven't yet looked up what was standard for the late TR4A.   Double drat ..my Moss catalogue is in storage..  I wonder why the clutch pipe is a larger diameter than the brake pipe.?

220474210_2021-03-10TR-Clutchbonnetbuffers007s.jpg.430859d90c89c0b918d8bb923dfbbe57.jpg

452007552_2021-03-10TR-Clutchbonnetbuffers024s.jpg.11973577b5944598e76110e77f804350.jpg

1953478653_2021-03-10TR-Clutchbonnetbuffers032s.jpg.6c46c87120484fe8da3cff582ca6abec.jpg

I cannot see any size markings on the slave cylinder, but I think it's fitted on the wrong side of the gearbox plate (thanks again to Rich for suggesting that possibility). The workshop manual p.2-106 fig.6 shows the slave cylinder to be mounted on the engine side of that plate.  I don't know what difference that positioning would make to the feel but surely the clutch lever's tie rod would be too long as is, or too short if the cylinder were moved forward to the other side of the gearbox plate.?

214091122_2021-03-10TR-Clutchbonnetbuffers023s.jpg.ce94304de3a49f5c3085c5dc6d01cd14.jpg

^ the slave cylinder's tie-rod fork end appears to be correctly positioned to the centre of three holes in the release bearing's lever arm, and naturally lubricated. Again there is no spring to add to the weight of the pedal. 

As said previously I believe the car is fitted with a Borg & Beck diaphragm clutch. "

. . .

A BIG thank you also for the shopping list - That will certainly help me be prepared, which in turn will save me in labour costs.   

The gearbox tunnel cover is an odd one but is a task I'd prefer to set aside 'for a later date'.   In short ; I don't believe either the bulkhead &/or the IRS chassis design are up to the job when cardboard (or fibreglass) is used to bridge the very long, wide gap from one side of the car to the other.  This was evident from the very first press-report of this model which, however politely, and despite Triumph's intrusive dashboard H-frame - slighted the new model's scuttle shake.  My intent "for a later date " is to replace that cardboard with steel-sheet (from the TR3 cover which I already have), cut and shove to fit the TR4 gearbox with overdrive.  This is to be done with a stiffer dashboard ..again derived from the TR3.  It's not a priority but getting rid of that H-frame would make the car so very much more airy comfortable for me  ..without loosing anything good of the original character of the TR4.!

Pete.   

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If that last photo is with the clutch released then it definitely looks like the drop-arm angle is wrong. Rather as with the handbrake relay lever, it works best if the "action" takes it over the vertical but that's already well beyond. Fitting the slave cylinder on the wrong side of the plate may have been somebody's "work-around" for the lack of travel but the root cause is that drop-arm angle.

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I would concur. Assuming that photo was taken at "rest" the operating arm is already past 90deg to the optimum line of movement, so IMHO the effort will be a diminising factor (vectors again) and increase the direct force needed to operate the clutch.

To some extent it is the same with (hand) brakes. They should always be set with an eye to having them hard on with the angle between cable and link as near to 90deg as possible?.

Pete

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Good morning all

The clutch release mechanism parts have been ordered and the car is booked in, for Thursday, to have the gearbox pulled and to hopefully sort the clutch fork pin. And to put the slave cylinder back in the right place. :rolleyes:

In the meantime.. 

After the strong winds and rain we've had this week, I went out in Katie  for the second time today .. to the farm produce shop ('Richards' in Westerfield) and then across to where my storage container is.  I had a few jobs I wished to do, or at least look at, a couple of which I'll come back to at another time.  But one little job was simply to check the cooling system, and to possibly to flush it out.  Let me share with you a few symptoms . .

  • radiator coolant water coming out of the expansion bottle after a run. That water is a little frothy.
  • emulsified water on the underside of the rocker cover cap.
  • oil pressure 50 psi
  • water level going down
  • oil level rising

Let me also share with you . .

  • rocker cover cap didn't have emulsified deposits when I viewed the car for purchase.
  • oil is very clean, obviously recently changed although the seller didn't mention that.
  • Oil and water level were normal at that time.
  • Oil pressure was c. 60psi around the housing estate during the test drive, when Bob drove. 
  • Bob has receipts for the figure 8 gasket and associated parts in April 2016.  Since then the car has done just 1100 miles.

Caveat Emptor

1075204792_TR2021-03-12123s.jpg.58cbcb6ffdc99729baaae1e92a7e563a.jpg

Together with the clutch fork this sorta bursts my 'Mr Happy bubble'. 

I will get over it because I do love the TR4, but I'm disappointed in finding myself so gullible.

Bidding you each a good weekend. 

Pete

.

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9 minutes ago, Bfg said:

Together with the clutch fork this sorta bursts my 'Mr Happy bubble'. 

I will get over it because I do love the TR4, but I'm disappointed in finding myself so gullible.

It happens to a lot of cars - they tootle about, the owner has known them for years and knows the faults, and the limits and has no problems; he's used to the little foibles. A new owner comes along, pushes the car more than it's been used to, even very slightly, and things let go. The seller will very honestly tell you 'it never did that with me' and he's probably right. It always takes a bit of fettling, and a bit of expense, before you get the car the way you want it and it will stand up to your own personal driving style.

Don't let it get you down - think of it as breaking in a horse to a new rider. It's only when you've worked on a car that you can really call it yours.

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1113197584_TR2021-03-12124s.thumb.jpg.8f996b16fc60e991a0d47cc617052d4e.jpg

^ now with white walls embellishes removed from the tyres

I know that Katie  could be a good driver's car once these issues are sorted out.  Despite ergonomic issues I love the driving experience and the car's style. I'm just disappointed that the seller appears to have not been up front with me. If he'd just said that " I'm letting you have the car at bottom dollar because of this and that", then all would have been fine. I would have made my purchase decision based on what he must have known about but preferred to conceal.

Thanks Colin, yes I also accept that It happens - the owner tootles about just to local shows and club meetings, and knows of the faults and the car's limits. But he's OK to live with them, and well as a long list of other 'foibles'.   A new owner comes along, and within the first 20 miles discovers the more major issues.  Knowing they are far from right ..but not how long they've been like that, so he fears the car is about to blow up and die.  Yes also to your point about pushing the car a little more than it's been used to ..perhaps as insignificant as 70mph on the motorway rather than 60, and things let go.  The seller will honestly tell you 'it never did that with me' and he may be right.

I'll first try to re-torque the cylinder-head bolts, I've also been advised that there's waterway blanking plug on the top face of the head, which have been known to corrode through. So I'll check that too.  But otherwise, because I now live in an apartment block and where my storage container is, is a dust bowl with sand and straw blowing around - I can't get into dismantling the engine.  So.., can anyone recommend a person, or affordable garage, near Ipswich, Suffolk who have good experience of the four cylinder TR engine ?  I very likely need the head lifted off and its cylinder sleeves set to the correct height for the figure-of-eight gasket to seal reliably. 

Thanks.  Pete

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Pete  a good site for  TR  clues and solutions is Buckeye triumphs  here is their link to clutch and the dreaded pin 

https://www.buckeyetriumphs.org/clutch

with the cold mayo in the rocker zone and cap is quite normal , if coolant is raising the oil level then it will go grey instantly 

are you sure the rising oil level is not petrol from a failed pump diaphragm 

so is it grey or got a whiff of petrol 

before you dive into deep pocket syndrome 

Pete

 

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