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Bleeding the clutch on a Vitesse


Robin
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I need to replace the leaking clutch master cylinder on my Mk2 Vitesse and just wanted some advice on how to bleed the system once the new cylinder is fitted. Is it straight forward?

Also, any advice on where to get a new master cylinder - the one currently fitted doesn't look to be original ?

Many thanks

 

Robin

 

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Don't start Pete on the 'up and down / quick - hold it - and slow' stuff again.

Bleed nipple to the top of the slave cylinder with a clear plastic pipe on, running to a jar of fluid and making sure it's beneath the level of the fluid in the jar to prevent air getting back in, (and where you can see it from your position unless you've a competent assistant!). Open the bleed nipple a turn or two with the master cylinder full of fluid, then just press the pedal slowly steadily and firmly to the bottom, and release slowly; keep an eye on the level in the master cylinder and after three or four presses, once bubbles stop coming along the pipe - make sure there are no late arrivals - then have the bleed nipple closed again. Job done. 

What does your current cylinder look like? It should be a 0.7 inch bore, same as my GT6, but some are metal these days, some plastic, and some aftermarket that might or might not do the job. Originally the reservoir and the cap would have been horizontal when mounted; some of the newer cylinders are at the wrong angle so the cap is tilted towards the front.

 

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Colin   no idea what  you are on about ,

Tneres a lot of ups and downs in life , some more pleasurable than others

Robin its best with the tunnel off but with with thin fingers and a wonky spanner   you can just fiddle to undo the slave bleed from the engine bay,  tie a string on the spanner so you can retrieve it when dropped

The more modern with a plastic reservoir may not be at the full angle but they hold more and you can see the levels you dont have to brim it till it spills.

Overall they are better but not original  land rover parts are  similar and very cheap

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The hole for the clutch operating lever in the bell housing always seems to me an open invitation to drop things in.

Originally the brake master cylinder reservoir wasn't horizontal so don't see why a non horizontal clutch master cylinder would be a problem.

Regards

Paul

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6 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

Colin   no idea what  you are on about ,

It's an age thing Pete, so I'll quote you from the Mini brakes thread.... :)

"Yes down quick  back slow.........reminds me of something else 

pete"

However Paul's right, Heralds and other smaller Triumphs have a horizontal brake master cylinder - usually replaced these days by right-angled versions as nowt else is available; but not that strange Vitesse thingy. Nor my GT6 either, as I had to run out and check, so just ignore that last bit of the earlier post.

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Thanks for the advice 

I've attached 2 pics of the Master Cylinder that's currently fitted but I think the one I need is similar to the one James Paddock sells - GMC205P. Does it matter that it's sloping and not straight?

 

IMG_5405.jpg

IMG_5404.jpg

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59 minutes ago, johny said:

Yes that's the original design clutch master cylinder sold by JP. Has a smaller reservoir than yours but running out of clutch fluid isn't as serious as on the brakes😳

Hi Johny

so does a smaller reservoir affect how the pedal feels?

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37 minutes ago, Robin said:

Hi Johny

so does a smaller reservoir affect how the pedal feels?

No. It just holds more fluid. This is more important for disc brakes as the caliper pistons move out as the pads wear causing the fluid level to drop quite rapidly.

The JP small angled reservoir is the correct one. Should be 5/8” bore.

Nick

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Hi All

Thanks for all the help - one last question....

I picked up a second hand clutch MS last year - think it's a Girling. I replaced the seals and cleaned it out but when I now depress the piston using the plunger, the piston doesn't return immediately - in fact it takes an hour or so. There's no fluid in the cylinder so I wonder if this is normal until it's actually fitted and full of fluid? Or should the piston return immediately regardless of the fluid level?

Thanks

 

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2 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

if its dry inside the  seal will  stick  try adding some fluid and try again with a few strokes

Pete

Hi Pete

Ok will try it. So I'm assuming that if it was working correctly the piston should return to it's full extension (after it's been pushed in) straight away?

Thanks

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For some value of "straight away", yes. The return spring is quite weak and a new seal, even when properly lubricated, exhibits some resistance. In use, there would be a return spring on the pedal and some hydraulic pressure contributing to a rapid return. When tested in isolation it may take a few seconds.

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13 hours ago, poppyman said:

Do they not have mirrors in Ireland Colin? :) 

Tony.

Only for looking behind when driving. I didn't see any point in hanging a mirror in the bathroom, so I just bought a painting of a grumpy old grey-haired so and so, and stand in front of that instead.

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