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D Day June 6th 1944


Pete Lewis
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One of the most remarkable battles we should not disrespect , the sacrifices must be remembered for ever 

What amazes me is the organisation of such a huge project was arranged with just telex telephone and a guy on a motorbike maybe radio 

No twitter,  email,whatsap  FB  or   IT      ,coding was just  Morse ,  and all the Will to pull this together ....it worked, 

Can you see them  doing it now    technology would cock it up completely, and predict Mulberry wont work etc.

We had some clever guys with out the box thinking

Hats of all those involved in a remarkable event

Ive been to Pegasus Bridge and the beaches ...awe inspiring thoughts

Pete

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My mother was chief cook in the officers mess, Charter Hall Bomber squadron. Meals for 100 sometimes 400. Chief cook should have been a sergeant, but you couldn't be a sergeant age 18. She phoned me yesterday "The commentator says those are ATS marching past, they're not! They're WAAFs! :angry:

Her "Why wasn't I invited to this?"

Me "They'd have you out the back cooking again!"

Makes you think, the organisation and logistics involved, incredible. 

Doug

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I was at Duxford yesterday for the Daks over Duxford / Normandy event - fantastic day of commemoration. My Mum, who lived in Gosport at the time of D-Day, remembers the trucks and tanks parked through the town and talking with the soldiers manning them when she was walking to school (age 7).

Gully

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21 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

What amazes me is the organisation of such a huge project was arranged with just telex telephone and a guy on a motorbike maybe radio 

No twitter,  email,whatsap  FB  or   IT      ,coding was just  Morse ,  and all the Will to pull this together ....it worked, 

Can you see them  doing it now    technology would cock it up completely, and predict Mulberry wont work etc.

Its because there was none of the modern stuff that this did work. It simply wouldn't today as you can't amass that sort of fire power and not be spotted. 

We went to Davidstow airport some years ago and they fooled the German spotter aircraft by painting cows on the runways 🙄

 

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28 minutes ago, Anglefire said:

We went to Davidstow airport some years ago and they fooled the German spotter aircraft by painting cows on the runways 🙄

Fairly early on in the war, the British tried to fool the Luftwaffe by placing a large number of cardboard cutout Spitfires in a field. The Luftwaffe sent a solitary plane to drop cardboard bombs on them.

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I think you should show us your evidence for a cardboard bomb, let alone cardboard aircraft, NM.   Sounds a most un-Nazi joke, that has been told, more convincingly, the other way around, that the RAF dropped a wooden bomb on a fake Nazi airfield.   See Snopes, who find it 'unproven', probably fiction: https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/lip-bomb/

Operation Fortitude is a well known part of the Overlord plan to convince the Nazis that the invasion would be onto the Pas de Calais, and included inflatatable tanks, lorries and aircraft parked on farmers' fields.  See the Imperial War Museum's page on the subject: https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205201879

Image result for D-day inflatable aircraft

Image result for D-day inflatable aircraft

Image result for D-day inflatable aircraft

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35 minutes ago, JohnD said:

I think you should show us your evidence for a cardboard bomb

I do hope it's true, but surely the enemy would want the other side to continue wasting their time and wouldn't want them to know they knew?

Doug

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I got it from a BBC documentary, and the man telling the tale claimed to have actually been there. It was also at a time when Germany were completely dominant and Britain was struggling to stay afloat, so the Snopes arguments are mostly not applicable. If the Luftwaffe wanted Britain to think the fakes were working, surely they'd need to waste real bombs, whereas dropping a cardboard one would "demoralise the enemy", which was absolutely part of the Blitzkrieg mentality. Still, I'll bow to your obviously superior knowledge.

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On 06/06/2019 at 09:42, Pete Lewis said:

Can you see them  doing it now   

Health and Safety wouldn't allow it in case someone got hurt.

(Plus the French would probably rather have the Germans these days than the British.)

...and finally: apologies to those brave men, of all nations, for both trivialising and politicising it on this the anniversary of their amazing feat, D-Day +1 as it is today. THAT for me was the saddest thing to learn as a child, that people who survived the momentous occasion of landing on D-Day were killed the next day, or the next, after all they had been through already.

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think i was a product of VE day, but arrived early  November  at 3.5lbs but spam and powdered egg got me through  

so i missed all this , luckier than some as parents were in reserved occupation in truck  manufacturing so they never got called up

but a  stray  V2 did land on the Commer factory in Luton and Blew a 3 wk old canteen to bits on a sunday. when factory was almost empty

it didnt stop production , 

derek who worked for me was involved with recon engines and a unit came in and the con rods were marked with swastica's

 obviously  they captured the truck did a repair and we later won it back ...

pete  

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A bit long the link below, sorry. the photos are of a local town centre 15 minutes away, that we are going to in 1/2 hour for a dental appointment, it was bombed by the allies on D Day because it had a railway yard. We are 2 hours by modern car on current roads from the beaches. Not all the initial action was at the coast. Terrible times for everyone. Many years ago when I worked for the Dept of the Environment I was in Germany at a base near Belsen and went to see the place even 30 years later it had an effect on us.

https://www.facebook.com/Direction-des-archives-et-du-patrimoine-culturel-de-lOrne-1307767812566615/?__tn__=kCH-R&eid=ARAxt-8HmGbwoLNrQ86ksLRBWwg7b-tSqYsilWoZ0YVdsjPxd-RXQJnz33MGG6MbcdXSDzDdhacB8C96&hc_ref=ARR10zljlPqWxlHexoXnZYRlS2xET4mTONSboZpVMji6MIeYoR16mDeYU2LklJt_QW4&fref=nf&__xts__[0]=68.ARAF9gqAju-91owmkuCDjVE6ZHFjvvpU_vsloP5D3jW-kdiS2ZQdn2YT8WGKUM50yXfip5ztFxyhWzvwafbCIGChmdMjpDrksUFb1rKHesPk8OeIdI8Izc-4pKjKfuA-fKWl13ll97txH1wes_kFQV7Q_1GcO24FbRbhPx1NVjSuwkro82UvxWpGkCWZ-ADfgaF2i4bfi1maQqQGfbVzmLRp7AowXgUKRJfTwSyz3ROpJeUYka_OL_kUnEOyvkv7WzRSeqhxCWBsb7P6ZJIVaCSOLynUmVhh360LH2favew2ijaWmH0A6ev9sJNNVLlFER2pAdGqO764YH-0zMdn

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I read a bit on a guy who was charged with sitting in a boat outside Calais playing noises of boats and talks and aircraftt over large speakers to make it sound like there was a task force on the way,  Can't help but think that must have been almost as bad a Normandy.

also had aircraft dropping tin foil confetti over him to show shadows on radar.

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What’s generally not understood, and certainly wasn’t appreciated in the run up to D-day, was that in many respects getting ashore would in some ways be the easy bit, and I use that term relatively, as little thought as what was going to happen after we were ashore.

The Normandy Bocage, a dense network of sunken lanes and deep hedgerows came as a significant shock to the allied armies, with no thought as to how operate in such terrain, which explains why it took 2 months to capture Caen, which was supposed to captured on day 2.

I think it’s a shame that so little attention is paid to the period directly after June 6th, where thousands on both sides were engaged in a brutal slugging match, where daily gains were measured in World War 1 increments, with casualties also inline with WW1.

Max Hastings Overlord is a sobering read on the post landing element of D-Day.

Karl

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"D-Day  to Berlin"

In all the coverage of the 75th anniversary of D-Day, I happened upon this film, shown late last night on BBC4.   George Stevens was a well known Hollywood film director, given the command of a special unit of the US Army.    He and his camera men went onto the beaches shortly after the first assualt, and went with the Allied forces all the way to Berlin. recording the invasion.      But this was not the official film.   Stevens had 'obtained' a supply of the new Kodachrome colour cine film, and took his own record at the same time, so this was the Allied invasion but in colour.    Surprisingly, he did nothing with the footage, maybe he was too busy, making his films of the Nuremberg Trials, and then such classics as Shane, Giant and The Diary of Anne Frank.     The cans were rediscovered in the '80s and made into this film by the Newsnight team.

It's as compelling as the recent reconstruction of WW1 film of the trenches, showing the 'ordinary soldiers', but also the captured Germans, and eventually the meeting of the Soviet and Allied forces outside Berlin.   Like the first it should be viewed with caution.     It does not flinch from showing the dead, and the sequence from Dachau, in colour, is especially affecting.    Also, good photo-journalism, when a group of camp guards protest on their treatment to a US officer, whose face shows how difficult it must have been not to shoot them on the spot.

The film is on the iPlayer, at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00l21wg/dday-to-berlin-newsnight-special

It's one of the films that should be reshown regularly, in public and to older chioldren in schools, to prevent the deniers and justifiers of fascism from getting any audience.

John

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10 hours ago, Bordfunker said:

What’s generally not understood, and certainly wasn’t appreciated in the run up to D-day, was that in many respects getting ashore would in some ways be the easy bit, and I use that term relatively, as little thought as what was going to happen after we were ashore.

The Normandy Bocage, a dense network of sunken lanes and deep hedgerows came as a significant shock to the allied armies, with no thought as to how operate in such terrain, which explains why it took 2 months to capture Caen, which was supposed to captured on day 2.

I think it’s a shame that so little attention is paid to the period directly after June 6th, where thousands on both sides were engaged in a brutal slugging match, where daily gains were measured in World War 1 increments, with casualties also inline with WW1.

Max Hastings Overlord is a sobering read on the post landing element of D-Day.

Karl

I live in 'Normandie' and here the events after D Day are covered every year in the local paper, local towns weren't liberated until mid August as mentioned above. In particular the Falaise gap was a serious battle ground. French & Canadian troops the main combattants in this part of Normandie.

Once the Germans realised the invasion was going to work they rounded up anyone they had suspected of being involved with the resistance but couldn't prove it and simply exicuted them. A street in my local town is called 'Rue des Quinze Fusillés' for this very reason. The Germans went to the surgury of the town doctor to arrest him on suspicion but the patients in the waiting room kicked up a stink and he legged it via the back window. Not to be thwarted they went to his home and shot his father.

Accounts like this are common place, unfortunately.

Not long after we moved here a farmer unearthed part of a plane in a field just outside the village. A german fighter. Locals were able to confirm that one had come down but being a German plane didn't bother to look for survivors unlike for allied planes.

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