Jump to content

Spin off conversion


Paul H
 Share

Recommended Posts

The idea with this conversion is that the filter can hang down and stay full of oil. The original used to empty itself so on start up took time to refill which caused the bearings to have to operate for a while without an oil supply. The only downside is that due to lack of space its difficult to get the conversion filter into a fully vertical position but anything is better than the original and some people use a smaller screw on filter to help....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, johny said:

The idea with this conversion is that the filter can hang down and stay full of oil. The original used to empty itself so on start up took time to refill which caused the bearings to have to operate for a while without an oil supply. The only downside is that due to lack of space its difficult to get the conversion filter into a fully vertical position but anything is better than the original and some people use a smaller screw on filter to help....

My filter is at approx 45 degrees . What’s the best fitting filter I should be using ?

Paul 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The spin-on conversion I put on my 2500S worked well, but the one on the Vitesse is just too awkward. My GT6 has the original canister and builds pressure just as quickly as the Vitesse does. I'm not planning to change the Vitesse back but I'm not planning to change the GT6 either. The original system is OK.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

45º is good. Obviously a smaller filter has a smaller flow capacity and its pressure drop due to dirt will increase at a greater rate than the specified one so the benefit is probably minimal. Do you have a problem with the bearings rattling on a cold start up until the oil gets round?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, johny said:

45º is good. Obviously a smaller filter has a smaller flow capacity and its pressure drop due to dirt will increase at a greater rate than the specified one so the benefit is probably minimal. Do you have a problem with the bearings rattling on a cold start up until the oil gets round?

I think I heard the death rattle once , that’s all , oil pressure on startup goes to 70 to 75 then settles back to 45 to 50 at about 2700 revs 

Paul 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

The low pressure rattle on start up is so devastating its only done it for 50,years ,  without a problem

Yup.

The engines were designed with the death rattle. Although I will own up to having a spin on/off conversion (canister at 45 degrees) It's so much easier and less messy to change the filter. Plus the rubber seal once gave way on the original system and lost ALL the oil, my ex was driving and didn't notice the little light.:angry: Cost me a new crank.

Doug

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mann 714/2 fits nicely and has a double anti-drain flap.  I have found the spin-on conversion to be hugely better than the standard arrangement.  Provided the right inner O-ring is fitted on the older style adaptor.

Pete, these engines, as a group may have been suffering death rattle for 50 years, but I'm damn sure no single engine has survived 50 years of the death rattle.   Metal to metal contact is undesirable -- end of story.

Nick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Nick Jones said:

Mann 714/2 fits nicely and has a double anti-drain flap.  I have found the spin-on conversion to be hugely better than the standard arrangement.  Provided the right inner O-ring is fitted on the older style adaptor.

Pete, these engines, as a group may have been suffering death rattle for 50 years, but I'm damn sure no single engine has survived 50 years of the death rattle.   Metal to metal contact is undesirable -- end of story.

Nick

Hi Nick , didn’t understand this part of your post 

Provided the right inner O-ring is fitted on the older style adaptor.”

Paul 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

modern ideas of filter positions , anti drains and much closer tolerances  just means on a modern engine the pressure wait on start up is not an audible clatter

go back to the 50s and many never had a filter to charge up. we know they do this so long as left a few seconds on idle its never going to wreck a crank

its just theres a paranoidal idea you have to fix it ,when in reality its not the most significant problem we encounter

head gaskets , manifolds .carbatooties, trunions   and much more fill the forums with questions and problems more than the  designed  odd start up rattle 

just some thoughts      while the suns out      

Pete

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

modern ideas of filter positions , anti drains and much closer tolerances  just means on a modern engine the pressure wait on start up is not an audible clatter

go back to the 50s and many never had a filter to charge up. we know they do this so long as left a few seconds on idle its never going to wreck a crank

The problem is that many of these engines were never designed to last fifty or sixty years, so squeezing a few more miles out of them by looking after them now is a big bonus. I was offered two very cheap luxury cars in the last month - none older than 2009 - by a friend in the trade but as one had 99000 miles and the other 140000 miles I avoided them like the plague; he was amazed as, in his opinion, both (Jaguars) will go on for years yet. I'm still of the 1960s / 70s mindset that a car with more than 80000 miles is done, because back in those days - they were.

One classic quote I always remember about a car is a seller being asked: "does she use much oil?" to which he replied: "she would use plenty - if she could get it!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The design of the post war Standard push rod OHV engines was in the early 1950's. These replaced the side valve type in use by Standards before and just after WW2. But were closer to the pre-war than the modern designs.

Hence both Pete's and Colin's points.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I removed the Mocal spin on conversion from my GT6 and reverted to the original canister - it was simply too much hassle trying to get the filter between the chassis rail, oil pressure switch and oil pressure relief valve. Ended up having to partially remove the conversion plate each time. The oil comes up to pressure rapidly with the original design on mine and only rattles if you Rev it prematurely. If I was paranoid I could churn the engine on the starter with no choke to circulate the oil before every cold start up, but I'm not!

For the GT6 it makes more sense to have the adaptor plate attached to a couple of pipes to allow the remote location of the filter and looking through the (now quite aged) Haynes restoration manual these used to be available, but I've not managed to find one.

Gully

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought that book back in the early 1990s and even then I never saw one other than that in the photo. I've run a quick google search for 'remote oil filter conversion' and there are hundreds, it seems to be just a case of making up a kit using the available components of oil take-off, pipes and remote canister connector.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...