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Home-made Tools and those you've adapted or modified. And also "tips and tricks".


Bfg
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Is that a 17mm?

I have  set of 8 and 10mm spanners like that, I cut off the heads and welded them back at an angle, that I use to adjust the length of the drop arms on my non-standard Pi throttle actuators. 

180276943_angledspanners001.jpg.021549b8ec66855da7e4ed794e0a749a.jpg

 So, I assume this is for some difficult-to-access nut, or plug. But much bigger.

I also have an altered spanner for the front nut that secures the exhaust manifold.    The standard is too long, but when cut down, it's had on the hands to get it tight, so I've wrapped it in a length of copper pipe.

750575085_Cutdownspanner.png.713df59317a833c13e12a90c93c49c87.png

That might suit a 17mm?  The tape covers where the pipe is secured to the spanner by wiring.

John

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2 minutes ago, JohnD said:

But not for the manifold?

It's for adjusting the mixture on the HS4s fitted to my Spitfire, it has to "dodge" the heatshield and the silly air filter things. It's oversized, which allows a bit of wiggle room around various obstructions, but is a tight enough fit to turn the adjuster without "skipping"

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My throttle adjusters weren't far wrong then!

I love to see 'altered' tools!   And specialised tools. 

My favourite examples are the mortice chisel, which has a square blade, so that it can be used as a lever to scrape out chips from the bottom of a mortice cavity,

Robert Sorby Limited Heavy Duty Sash Mortice Chisel - Framing ...

 

 

and the glaziers hacking knife, a heavy bladed instrumetn with a wide back.   It is designed to be used with a hammer, to remove old putty from a frame:Crown Tools 5" Chipping Knife / Hacking Knife – Hardwick & Sons

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^ Thanks John, I found something very similar to that glazier's knife in the bottom of an old tool box. Never could find a use for an extra thick bladed blunt knife with a taped up wooden handle. Now I know I never will 

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Not homemade,  but maybe of use to someone...... for years I have always struggled to get a good seal on my grease gun, despite my best endeavours and using cloth over the grease-nipple I always seemed to get only 10% where it was intended and mess elsewhere!

I spotted this on special offer a while ago on amazon, used it this afternoon and it was a revelation - all grease in the right place, job done in seconds.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/G-COUPLER-Coupler-Lock-Clip-off-machine/dp/B0133NDH6E

not cheap for what it is, but I suspect it will pay for itself in reduced grease consumption and fewer swear-box contributions!

....... Andy 

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"So, seeking for further amusement" I reviewed my files and found this:

DSCF0814.thumb.JPG.11a08481e72b91454b9d1e9bd0c4b7a1.JPG

 

P1000687.JPG.472d54d11816e57a36508ad7df9655ae.JPG

This piston stop is easily made from a piece of square/rectangular tube, or some angle iron.

It will allow you to find more accurately the TDC than is possible with a dial guage.

If you want to do the job without removing the head studs, then two lengths of tube with washers on top, will secure the stop in place over the studs.

Jphn

PS "Seeking for further amusement"    Stanley Holloway, may amuse you.  His version of "Albert and the Lion" is famous, and he did many others, for instance "Sam Small"

 

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2 hours ago, JohnD said:

This piston stop is easily made from a piece of square/rectangular tube, or some angle iron.

I like that one John, I spent ages beggaring around trying to find TDC using a dial gauge it took something like 6 or 7 itterations to hone it down to a position I had any confidence in. When I re-checked it using a piston stop I was about 2 degrees out. 

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18 minutes ago, JohnD said:

Easily, or rather not easily, done!

I think the problem with the dial gauge method is that you need to note the point at which it stops moving and then when it starts again and then find the mid-point, which means you have to be turning to to find those points, which is pretty much impossible to do smoothly and reliably IMHO. I had similar issues but nowhere near as bad setting the cam timing as you have to identify the point of max lift on #1 inlet. 

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on the stanley hollaway  dad had  on  12" 78s    Albert comes back,  the magna carta,  marksman sam , battle of hastings    

we need some funnies these days 

 All the much-loved characters such as Albert Ramsbottom (‘with a stick with an ‘orse’s ‘ead ‘andle’), Sam Small (‘Sam, Sam, pick oop tha’ arm), and King ‘Arold (‘on his ‘orse with his ‘awk in his ‘and’) are legends 

Pete

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This will allow me to support the car on the wheel jacks when I have a wheel removed for longer than a day and can move it back to its stored place. Thats so I can repack the garage and get everything back in its place.

Its a lot safer then placing blocks of timber across the bars of the wheel jack.

 

 

Plate plan (Medium).JPG

Plate edge (Medium).JPG

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 Just seen this on the TR forum, posted by Bob (LeBRo) and thought it was a good enough idea to share here . .

1334763109_Headleaktester.jpg.ed2a453a8a6de67c81f107e375002861.jpg

Bob writesFollowing a suggestion from Hamish, today I made an adapter out of an old spark plug to allow me to inject compressed air into the pot.  So took rocker box off, turned engine till No. 2 rockers were rocking, so that I knew both valves on No. 3 will be closed. (yes there was clearance between valves & rockers) inject air at approx 50 PSI  and lo & behold lots of air exiting from the exhaust (none from carbs)."

Thanks Bob / Hamish .. I'd not seen that one before.

Pete.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Bfg said:

 Just seen this on the TR forum, posted by Bob (LeBRo) and thought it was a good enough idea to share here . .

1334763109_Headleaktester.jpg.ed2a453a8a6de67c81f107e375002861.jpg

Bob writesFollowing a suggestion from Hamish, today I made an adapter out of an old spark plug to allow me to inject compressed air into the pot.  So took rocker box off, turned engine till No. 2 rockers were rocking, so that I knew both valves on No. 3 will be closed. (yes there was clearance between valves & rockers) inject air at approx 50 PSI  and lo & behold lots of air exiting from the exhaust (none from carbs)."

Thanks Bob / Hamish .. I'd not seen that one before.

Pete.

Pete, I've seen something very similar before, but used for changing valve springs in situ rather than testing valves etc.

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