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Rear hub retaining nut.


Phil C
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I'm currently fitting CV driveshafts to my Vitesse restoration and they came with retaining nuts as per the photo.

I have not come across this type before but I guess the thin edge of the nut is tapped down into the recess once torqued up???

Any good or should I source nyloc equivalents?

Personally I like to see a split pin but may be that's just my age!

 

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yes  just drift the flange into the slot,  removing these nuts is best to drill the dimple out , as other means doesnt work and just wrenching it off will tear the end threads to bits 

  presume   rotaflex  the hub endfloat is 0.005 - 0.0025"   which if ok should remain the same as youre just swapping the shaft

pete

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My CV shafts came with the same nut and slot to peen the thin nut section into.

I'd suggest you will need to check the end float - unless you can ensure on the bench that the rear flange / spacer / distance pieces dimensions to the hub seating position are the same between the old and new shafts. Of course, if you're replacing the bearings at the same time, you will need to set it all up from scratch...

Gully

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Thanks Guys, I had never seen that type of nut before. I thought that's what I had to but sought confirmation before getting the hammer out😳

Also new bearings so shimming too which is a pain but at least the hubs are on the bench.

I'm following the advice note from Canley's technical archive but with only 3 thou shims available it is proving difficult achieving the exact end float.

Phil

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26 minutes ago, Phil C said:

Thanks Guys, I had never seen that type of nut before. I thought that's what I had to but sought confirmation before getting the hammer out😳

Also new bearings so shimming too which is a pain but at least the hubs are on the bench.

I'm following the advice note from Canley's technical archive but with only 3 thou shims available it is proving difficult achieving the exact end float.

Phil

Hi Phil , I rebuilt my rotoflex setup on my mk2 Vitesse a couple of years ago and had difficulty in  achieving  the correct endfloat . I purchased mine from http://www.leacyclassics.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=Shims+&cat= . My situation was I needed 18 thou of shims which would have been 6 shims . From memory I purchased a 10 thou shim from them . Hope this helps 

Paul 

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Thanks Paul. I had the opposite problem.

One hub had zero end float so with one shim now has 3 thou  - which I'm guessing is close enough 🤠

The other had - 8 thou so with three shims resulted in 1thou end float - which I am also considering close enough..........unless someone advises otherwise?

If I had a lathe (which I don't) the skill to use it (which I don't) I suppose I could machine the end of the hub and get it perfect !

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1 hour ago, Pete Lewis said:

On nicks we simply used a sand disc in a pillar drill and faced with rotating the hub  removed a few  thou , its not hardened

Just need to keep it flat and square to the  bore ,,  not hard  to achieve even with an file'

Pete

Just like the REME

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Rough engineering made easy)

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Worth noting that Richard Bliscoe (who advertises in The Courier) has all the various distance pieces available, so with the combination of those and the 3 thou spacer it should be relatively straightforward to achieve the specified half to 2.5 thou end float (without grease). Pete and I found it's as much feel as measurement when you get close!

Gully

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I’ve actually got the same locking nut system on the cv conversion I got from jigsaw. As stated earlier, trial and error to get adequate end float with various shims from Leacey classics but haven’t peened over yet. I was wondering if threadlock might be better to allow removal if necessary at a later date?

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3 hours ago, Gully said:

Worth noting that Richard Bliscoe (who advertises in The Courier) has all the various distance pieces available, so with the combination of those and the 3 thou spacer it should be relatively straightforward to achieve the specified half to 2.5 thou end float (without grease). Pete and I found it's as much feel as measurement when you get close!

Gully

I bought all five of the different thickness distance pieces plus several 0.003" shims prior to the work on my hub but at the end of the day we didn't use any of them.  If anyone is desperate for a particular distance piece I can possibly help.

Nick

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20 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

On nicks we simply used a sand disc in a pillar drill and faced with rotating the hub  removed a few  thou , its not hardened

Just need to keep it flat and square to the  bore ,,  not hard  to achieve even with an file'

Pete

Genius Pete. I have a pillar drill so will give this a go. I also love the plywood packing seal locater solution as I didn't want to be pulling off the bearing (again!) - how easy does the seal locate or is there a knack required ?

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17 hours ago, Adrian said:

 I was wondering if threadlock might be better to allow removal if necessary at a later date?

Given the importance of this nut and the pressures it may endure during driving I'd prefer a more solid approach to keeping it in place. Personally I'd secure the nut by hammering the edge down into the slot as originally designed, but then I'm a worrier. Threadlock might work but I wouldn't want to find out the hard way...! 

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Thanks all for you input. 

Armed with the advice provided I feel better prepared to refine the end float further. 

Both the hubs and drive shafts are new providing snug fitting splines so I think the nut type provided will be ok.

.....however what were Triumph thinking when this design was on the drawing board 🤬🤬🤬

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it always struck me as very odd when they had a number of CV shaft designs across the BL range , some good some not so good , but the permanently  stressed rotaflex 

is stressed before it starts to turn   and the inside out arrangement must have been dreamt up after a skin full

used on Imps and much better straight forward design amongst others that used them  including boat propeller shaft drives

Pete

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