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Valve seals


Tanky

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Hi all again, I spoke to Rimmers yesterday about valve stem seals. (I hope that's right) little rubber seals on my valves. I wanted replacements as I have them fitted. Rimmers say they shouldn't be fitted as it was an aftermarket botch and they left the factory with none fitted. Any advice, should I replace them or remove them and leave them off....?

Also, my valves were heavily coated in coke, I suspect that this could be the cause of my misfire....thoughts?

Lastly, the PO said it had been converted to Unleaded and I have some paperwork to support it, but I'm not convinced, is there any harm in me adding additive if it has been converted? 

Many thanks all, I really appreciate your advice..

Charlie

Many thanks all.

20200410_144205.jpg

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there are a number of stem seals knocking around  some are an 0 ring fits inside the guide  and others are a cap fits over the guide,

the valves on our engines rely on a small level of lubrication to avoid seizure   so never fit guide seals unless you wish for impending failure

even bronze guides often  sold as an upgrade  will give early life seizures so in the course of happy driving do what Triumph designed and it will do what you want

for years ,

yes only the exhaust will have a hard ring insert , and may have the vale itself of a later spec to suit , but   def.  no seals 

your deposits are not bad  a bit of mixture and cheap fuel sooty   do you run on 95ron**  or 97+ ????

why is the head off  ???   some of the seats look a bit dull  but what made you feel this needed a strip down ???

Pete

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I changed Herald guides recently, and to be honest the basic steel guides were the best, given the mileage I'll be doing, so if you're buying replacements consider the use your engine will be getting before you waste money on the bronze or even stainless versions.

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Hi Pete, nice to hear from you again. My Spit is undergoing a complete rebuild and respray, so it made sense (to me anyway!) While the engine and gearbox were out I might as well change the head gasket I also had an annoying oil leak from the sump. 

If you remember from previous posts of mine, I had a misfire when the engine was hot and it was suggested, amongst others that it might not have been converted to unleaded and the valves might not be seating properly due to being coked up....

The valve seals are little black hard rubber 'O' rings. So if you as a Triumph Jedi say leave them off, so be it.....

And yes, I run it only on 97....

Please keep the advice coming....

Cheers all......

Charlie

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thats some odd advice   valves will gain deposits be they leaded or unleaded makes absolutley no difference 

poor mixture .timing valve clearances and crappy fuel ,poor air cleaners, bad breathing, wrong plugs  valve timing

lots of short runs on choke  will make soot and carbon on the back of the valve no matter whats lead or unleaded

you valves look pretty clean compared to some real growth that can occur with years of poor running .

oil down the guides  and bad breathing   will add some good grott  

Pete

 

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When my brother and I bought the 1500 engine that's now in my Spitfire, to fit to a Herald estate with utterly shot crank, we took the seller's word that it was a runner and just fitted it. OK, we took the head off for transport but didn't even de-coke it. When we finally got it back together and fired up, it ran beautifully for all of three seconds before conking out with no compression on any cylinder. Now that was a heavily coked engine! We're talking nearly half an inch of soot build up - so much that after a while sat idle and then getting shaken back to life, the heavy deposits on the back of the inlet valves worked loose and jammed them all open. And that was in 1989 so it had never seen unleaded.

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2 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

lots of short runs on choke  will make soot and carbon on the back of the valve no matter whats lead or unleaded

you valves look pretty clean compared to some real growth that can occur with years of poor running .

oil down the guides  and bad breathing   will add some good grott  

Pete

 

My early 1200 engine before I stripped it down... :)

DSCF0585.jpg.065456bc9cb80c29a6bd7ccd576ef8aa.jpg DSCF0577.jpg.a7c7824a782670380b530b95abc50b36.jpg

 

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Yes, those are valve stem seals, fancier than the ones I've seen suggested and might actually stay in place. But as Pete said,

5 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

the valves on our engines rely on a small level of lubrication to avoid seizure   so never fit guide seals unless you wish for impending failure

 

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  • 2 years later...
On 11/04/2020 at 21:37, Pete Lewis said:

hopefully destined for the bin.  you also have to ensure a seal does not impede the valve drop there aint a lot of room between the collets and guide top on full stroke 

a seal may cause interference ...just to add a a thought  

Pete

You are right here Pete. As per my 2500 engine post. Probably what my problem is. I will remove them if discover that they are fitted. (By the rope method).

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        When I erroneously fitted them to my vitesse engine that I put in my MGB, I made a slimline chisel out of a thin screwdriver. Working between the spring coils, I was able to cut the seal vertically, and then drag  it out with some pointed nose pliers. Make sure the seal spring doesn`t disappear and join the tappets etc.

  

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