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Post welding treatments


Tom
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Hello, I'm busy doing the repairs on my rear tub ( 1200 Herald conv ). I am no bodywork expert , I kind of muddle my way slowly and carefully through and generally get there in the end. I have been coating all the repairs in zinc primer asap after welding. My question is should all the new welded seams and repaired sections be coated in some kind of seam sealer? something like Tiger seal?

I wondered if sealers just tended to trap moisture?

Thanks, 

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I use tigerseal/or similar and find it very good. I have also started using weld-through primer before welding repairs etc.

Essential to use a decent wax protection once final paint has happened, dynax s50 in aerosols, or dinitrol  if you have a compressor etc. 

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I haven't done any major panel replacements for a while, but I still have a tin of  brushable seam sealer.     An advantage may be that the solvent is cellulose thinners, so I can add some to the tin if it's got a bit dried out, or else to adjust the consistency.     The polyurethane sealants will go off on the shelf once used at all and be unusable.   No probs for a big project, but wasteful for a small.

Weld-through primer, brush on sealer, primer and paint.

 

 

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Ok, I've used Tiger seal before so will probably stick with it.

I do have access to a compressor so maybe I should look into the alternatives to waxoyl. Clive have you used Dinitrol? How did you find it?

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I used the  dinitrol 3125 (I think!) a single litre pot goes a long was as no aerosol propellant. Sprayed all inside the sills, and just about every seam I could. Highish pressure creates an amazing mist in box sections, and the stuff is so thin (almost as thin as WD40) it must cover everything, unlike waxoil.

On wheelarches and underbody I used the dintrol hard wax, and I was expecting to reapply annually, but after 5 years it is still good (despite lots of long fast touring some in heavy rain)

I chose dinitrol by reputation, but Dynax is very good and I think they are pretty much teh same, likewise Bilt Hamber. All are streets ahead of waxoil which tends to lift and get water under it, and reapplication doesn't help. (just my experience)

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I find Kent Waxcoat  aerosols  convenient for small jobs -even comes with its own handy probe for cavities.

Also comes in  shutz type can for compressor application.

Tend to see it in the big motor factors that supply the trade so perhaps not as easy to get.

More Dinitrol-like than Waxoyl .Smells nicer.

Waxoyl is fine - but  the solvent appears to be white spirit and I suspect many dilute it further  to help it spray better with that  hopeless spray thingy  they supply.( A really good garden sprayer works better, but a compressor and Shutz gun and lance set up is in a different league if you can hire or borrow ) 

I suspect that white spirit  evaporates -   dries, leaves a coating that cracks rather easily.

The answer,I think is to dilute  Waxoyl with something other than just white spirit.

I have used paraffin, engine, gear or thin “spindle oil” ( think Three in one )

 New oil, that is. Don’t use old engine oil- this job is messy enough without guddling around  in  black carcinogenic muck (it is probably corrosive in box sections anyway)-

Warm weather and warming the  can make the job so much easier.

This is flammable stuff, though -No naked flames and loosen the cap as it will expand - the shutz type can is a very weak thin-walled can and won’t stand much pressure..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well tomorrow should see the last of the rear tub repairs 😀. I'll scrape the last of the underseal and then spend a good few hour wire wheeling the underside. 

I plan then to Zinc rich primer the entire underside and then a couple of coats of Frosts chassis satin black like the chassis. 

I'm just checking when the seam sealer should be applied, I was going to do what Bordfunker suggested Primer then sealer makes sense to me, is this correct use of the sealers ( Tigerseal ), it does say it over paintable.

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On 30/04/2020 at 19:18, clive said:

I used the  dinitrol 3125 (I think!) a single litre pot goes a long was as no aerosol propellant. Sprayed all inside the sills, and just about every seam I could. Highish pressure creates an amazing mist in box sections, and the stuff is so thin (almost as thin as WD40) it must cover everything, unlike waxoil.

On wheelarches and underbody I used the dintrol hard wax, and I was expecting to reapply annually, but after 5 years it is still good (despite lots of long fast touring some in heavy rain)

I chose dinitrol by reputation, but Dynax is very good and I think they are pretty much teh same, likewise Bilt Hamber. All are streets ahead of waxoil which tends to lift and get water under it, and reapplication doesn't help. (just my experience)

There is also dinirol 3125HS in an aerosol with a 6" tube.  Hs = High Soilds.

It sprayed on it is thick, yet runny. But soon settles down and produces a thick(ish) solid even coat

If you can get it into your sills it would give a very good covering for the bottom joint where most sill rot out.

Can be used anywhere out of sight - as it is dark brown and is a bit obvious.

 

Roger

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19 hours ago, Tom said:

Just getting back to the sealer/primer question. Is it the general consensus that it is ok to prime and then use seam sealer? 

I used a Rust Buster, then Seam Sealer, and Painted over that?.

Pete

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Hello again fellas,

rear tub welding is finally complete........I don't think I can face the grinder and mig again welder for at least a month!!! I then scraped of as much of the underseal with a chisel and window scraper, very tedious and dull, I probably spent a day doing this. Then I attacked it with a wire wheel on the drill and grinder and then degreased it with the solvent I bought with the Zinc rich primer I have.

I know it all sounds like a faff and getting the bottom blasted would have been far easier and more effective but I'm doing this on a very tight budget and getting the tub to the blasters would have been very tricky for me. I'm happy with it up to now and it's very satisfying using all the bits and materials I have collected and stockpiled over the last few years for 'when I get round' to the Herald!! This car was rapidly approaching the 'need for Car SOS status' but I'm beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel now.

It is primed now, it's not perfect but it's a damn sight better than it was and I'm a happy man! I'm going to run round all the seams and weld repairs today with Tiger seal and then finish it tomorrow with a couple of coats of the Frosts chassis satin black, it's cured to a nice finish on the chassis.

As far as future rust protection, I think I'm going to go with the Dinitrol system, probably with aerosols as my compressor has just given up the ghost!

 

DSCN6260.JPG

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Good stuff! yes, undersides can be soul destroying. Finishing work covered in black gunk.....

But satisfying when clean and painted, where you are at. 

Re compressor, check the starter capacitor (especially if it makes a faint noise/hum but the motor won't start) It is a big white cylinder, mine looked a bit like a melted marshmellow when it gave up. Few quid off fleabay and job done.

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When my compressor packed up it turned out to be just a blown fuse, but as Clive says, the starter capacitor is often the culprit, or the pressure regulator switch. Unless, of course, it's got a more obvious fault, like the cracked cylinder head that mine developed (replacement parts no longer available so I had it repaired with chemical metal).

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Thanks for the encouragement it really helps to bounce information/ideas of you folk as  sometimes I find myself going round in circles in my head trying to make decisions!

Seams are sealed now so I think I'll take your advice and have a look at the compressor.....after I've youtubed 'how to check a starter capacitor'!

Update. Looks like it may be the capacitor as power is getting past the pressure switch, I've ordered one of ebay.

Just getting back to rust protection. I'm definitely going to inject the interior of the chassis with Dinitrol and the cavity areas of the body but I'm not fully convinced about coating the entire underside and exterior of the the chassis with a product as doesn't this just provide a sticky layer for dirt and grime and hence moisture to stick to? as the underside of my car will be freshly painted is it worth just sticking with that finish which can easily be cleaned down?

Edited by Tom
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Hi tom, im very much the same as you in regards of muddling my way through.

The route i took was...I had my tub blasted, done all the (many) weld repairs, primer, seam sealer and then applied a stone chip prior to top coat and lacquer. This should give me a good protection for hopefully a long time.

If you wanted something a little bit more substantial than a stone chip coat, you could try this sprayable bag sealer which iv used on my arches, it goes on nicely with a Schulz gun and is over sprayable. My mate used it on his mini arches 5 years ago and it still looks good as new, heres the ebay link...  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/183746756235

 

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