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Dropping the propshaft out and rear brake cylinder


RichardS
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4 hours ago, Nigel Clark said:

+1

I would expect a late GT6 diff (probably any GT6 diff) would have a rubber lip seal. While you have access, as well as looking for the serial number, it would be interesting to check the final drive ratio and confirm it really is 3.89:1 as expected.

Nigel

I'm sure that it's a 3.89:1 as we checked it when we were trying to sort out the speedo problem. One turn of one wheel produces almost 2 turns of the prop shaft

We've put in a rubber lip seal now but I knew that something strange was going on when I drilled a small hole in the metal outer face of the old seal and then tried to screw in a self-tapper to force the seal out. I could not screw in the self tapper more than a turn or two before it hit solid metal again. It should have been going into something soft. Rather then drilling deeper we decided to chisel the seal out as I wasn't sure what I would be drilling into.

Richard

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2 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

 a coupling  castle nut has solid pinion  bearing spacer just retorque , 

a nyloc has ( generally) a collapsible spacer and must be marked for position and  retorqued to its original position or you can 

alter the pre load of the pinion bearings 

Pete

Mine has a castellated nut so we torqued it up to the setting in the Haynes manual. 100  - 120 ft lbs if I remember correctly. It certainly felt that tight when we took it off. 

Richard

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Just to continue this rear brake saga ..... in the absence of any H-clips I decided to rig up a spacer on the end of the brake actuating arm to stop the brake shoe dropping off the edge of the piston. First I did the offside which seemed to be the most problematic but the spacer did the trick. I then went to do the nearside and was puzzled to find that the spacing was different, so I decided to take a few measurements and, guess what, the distance from the backplate to the middle of the piston was about 6 or 7 mm greater on the nearside cylinder than the offside cylinder. 

The nearside cylinder is clearly the correct part and the brake shoe rides nicely on the centre-line the piston whereas the offside is from something else and allows the shoe to drop off the piston. 😞 

As luck would have it, the correct cylinder is the one which was completely seized and I had to abrade the corrosion from the piston to make it work whereas the incorrect cylinder functioned perfectly.

Anyway, I've had enough of this so have ordered everything new apart from the drums themselves which are in very good condition. 🙂 

Richard

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pleased you have found the culprit 

sounds like a bit of sods law has crept in crapped and about to creep out but youve spotted the differences 

without a doubt some owners fit some very off parts   we found a wheel cyl where the previous owner  had fitted the piston back to front in an

attempt to expand  an undersized seal fit the bore ....it leaked  seriously but it had a mot. same day 

bodgers and spurious parts do not help us to have fun 

Pete

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