Jump to content

Steering Wheel Boss Fouling..


Recommended Posts

Sooo. I decided to change the steering wheel in my GT6. Before assembly I made sure with the seller and Springalex that the boss was the correct model. I am now thinking it isn't.

So I fit the boss and it seems to sit perfectly flush with the steering column rim and fouls it meaning that i have metal on metal rubbing each other.

The original boss sits 'inside' the column and is rubber backed.

It appears that the new boss raised centre doesnt clear the outside of the colums edge enough for them to not meet.

Anyone come across this before? Is there anyway I can pack it out to stop it fouling.20200630_120213.thumb.jpg.2f28e03a4c3ad098af8b2a693a58f17a.jpg20200630_121036.thumb.jpg.7b050b399e005520a69898fe56d98cd8.jpg20200630_121045.thumb.jpg.cb568aee292f58046375a295e4642038.jpg20200630_121124.thumb.jpg.2bf536f6e1d766425864cbeab4cd1d1d.jpg20200630_121139.thumb.jpg.ef24456786de314317b34bf84e7747de.jpg20200630_121152.thumb.jpg.7dd9c4997b91a726ce97ded9023566c7.jpg20200630_121210.thumb.jpg.1c477c7ce8c47ddacbecfed95d78bd29.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would expect that by loosening the impact clamp, you can extend the inner column a fraction to give the required clearances for the new boss.

Tighten the impact clamp after to specified torque settings. From memory, the Allen screw should be 9 lb ft and the nut is 18 lb ft, but best to check in the manual.

Nigel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Nigel Clark said:

I would expect that by loosening the impact clamp, you can extend the inner column a fraction to give the required clearances for the new boss.

Tighten the impact clamp after to specified torque settings. From memory, the Allen screw should be 9 lb ft and the nut is 18 lb ft, but best to check in the manual.

Nigel

Hi Nigel,

That makes sense. Now to find the impact clamp 😅.

Thanks for the advice!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Nigel Clark said:

I would expect that by loosening the impact clamp, you can extend the inner column a fraction to give the required clearances for the new boss.

Tighten the impact clamp after to specified torque settings. From memory, the Allen screw should be 9 lb ft and the nut is 18 lb ft, but best to check in the manual.

Nigel

So after looking in manual I have found it. Its in such a tight space. How am I meant to be able to retorque them in such a small gap. I can do the bottom nut but the allen screws would be near impossible.

Should I be able to move the upper column as normal anyway as per the pics?.. i can literally do it by hand (with ignition on)

1593531441281610362639902689314.thumb.jpg.a9623eaeb7c408688f4169e5d144ae2e.jpg1593531311295930222481294899865.thumb.jpg.b70bfbdfa0c71947d2f344bd5a1cf13b.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The column is meant to move in the event of an accident. It should b held by the pressure from the allen socket headed bolt on the clamp so that needs tightening to hold the column.I you undo all the clamps if i remember correctly you can also adjust the position of the outer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, DanMi said:

The column is meant to move in the event of an accident. It should b held by the pressure from the allen socket headed bolt on the clamp so that needs tightening to hold the column.I you undo all the clamps if i remember correctly you can also adjust the position of the outer

Cheers Dan. I haven't undone any clamps yet and the outer also moves forwards and backward so seems that needs tightening too.

I'm still confused after loosening the impact clamp and pulling out the inner how I could possibly get in there to retorque to the right setting 🤨

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the impact clamp should be easily accessible  as its supposed to be just out of the outer tube , always on show, when youre upside down drop the torch and get dust on the glasses  .

both tube and inner column are designed to collapse towards the facia in a crash ,  if the boss fouls give the outer a good push and wiggle it will move in the fascia clamps 

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, B5NWW said:

I'm still confused after loosening the impact clamp and pulling out the inner how I could possibly get in there to retorque to the right setting 🤨

The WSM points out that the allen key grub screw is the one that needs a very specific torque, and that the other two hold the bracket together so that their torque setting won't affect the grub screw. Or, rather, it points out the consequence of this, which is you should just undo the hex-head bolts, adjust, then re-tighten them without disturbing the allen-head one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

two scenarios  if its allen screw is  loose the column will drop /collapse   if its too tight  , you  wont know  till you get impaled on the wheel in a crash  

the torque given for the grub screw is 18-20 lbft      ie a firm hand nip with a decent wrench,  no gorilla hands  stuff  nor weak pinkies 

Pete

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks all. Super helpful so far, hopefully am getting there.

I found the impact clamp and can confirm there is movement when pushing forward and pulling back the inner column from the area of the splines/where sat the steering wheel. 

Just so I get this right to stop any future impaling or otherwise near death experience. I have attached a photo. Which bolts should or shouldn't I mess with?

I am guessing the socket screw stops any movement of the inner column so guessing not tight enough?

20200630_201702.thumb.jpg.48cbd765d6243110b1b41b7982dad370.jpg20200630_203445.thumb.jpg.0c9c6490394a9837494b10ee7ac41420.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

That large single one is the allen key - it's set to a specific torque to collapse in the event of a collision.

The two smaller ones on the other side are easier to deal with - I think they're 7/16, undo both, move the column, and retorque back to suitable tightness.

Perfect. Thanks Colin! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m sorry to disagree with everyone, but the correct refitting sequence is to loosen off the locknut and large screw, then torque the two bolts, then torque the large screw and then the locknut.  Failing to follow this sequence will leave the large screw too loose and not putting enough Pre load pressure on the shaft.  The reason is because the torque of the large screw is a lot greater than the bolts, so unless the bolts are torqued to the same torque as the screw was, the screw will not be properly loaded - and the bolts will likely shear if they are torqued to the same torque as the screw.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's interesting to see that instructions in the WSM are to 'tighten the screw by hand as tight as possible without bending the wrench'... some of us can bend wrenches more easily than others, and it all depends on the quality of the wrench... :)

12 hours ago, KevinR said:

unless the bolts are torqued to the same torque as the screw was, the screw will not be properly loaded - and the bolts will likely shear if they are torqued to the same torque as the screw.

I don't quite get this bit, though... I think I know what you're getting at but it seems to cancel itself out!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, indeed. I was sure (one of) the WSM gave torque figures and said not to disturb the setscrew. I don't think it's tighter than the hex-heads, as the "by hand" implies quite a small wrench. Besides, its purpose is to clamp "just enough" so nowhere near the shear strength of 1/4" bolts.

In fact, thinking about it, the laws of physics require that the small hex-head bolts are able to withstand the force of the setscrew done up to its required torque. It cannot be necessary to tighten them beyond their limit to get them fully seated, whether before or after the setscrew. Certainly if you need to re-set the clamping load then Kevin's procedure is required. But if you haven't disturbed the setting then his dire warning about consequences cannot be right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, NonMember said:

No, indeed. I was sure (one of) the WSM gave torque figures and said not to disturb the setscrew. I don't think it's tighter than the hex-heads, as the "by hand" implies quite a small wrench. Besides, its purpose is to clamp "just enough" so nowhere near the shear strength of 1/4" bolts.

 But if you haven't disturbed the setting then his dire warning about consequences cannot be right.

That's what I thought, but me being me I assumed I'd made a foo-pas. I know I read that within the last month or two, that the grub screw if not disturbed should be left alone and the two other bolts tightened to the correct torque, and have been desperately searching my manuals for the exact wording - but of course can't find it this morning!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's just that my WSM has torque settings of 6-8 for the bolts and 18-20 grub screw.

Unless this is a typo (doubt it as it fits in with the relative sizes of the grub screw and fixing bolts) then if the grub screw is left as it is you would have to exceed the torque figure for the bolts to tighten the thing up!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

50 minutes ago, johny said:

It's just that my WSM has torque settings of 6-8 for the bolts and 18-20 grub screw.

Unless this is a typo (doubt it as it fits in with the relative sizes of the grub screw and fixing bolts) then if the grub screw is left as it is you would have to exceed the torque figure for the bolts to tighten the thing up!

That clears up what Kevin meant - got it now.

Stick to the WSM, it's best for peace of mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, johny said:

It's just that my WSM has torque settings of 6-8 for the bolts and 18-20 grub screw.

Unless this is a typo (doubt it as it fits in with the relative sizes of the grub screw and fixing bolts) then if the grub screw is left as it is you would have to exceed the torque figure for the bolts to tighten the thing up!

Exactly, the bolts could fail if you try and apply the required torque to get the preload.

By having the grub screw loose, torqueing the bolts and then torqueing the grub screw you are only putting extra TENSION on the bolts, and that wont cause them to fail.  If the tension in the bolts necessary to get the grub screw preload is achieved by torqueing the bolts then it is the TORSION during the torqueing that will cause them to fail.

I have an assembly at work that we do up a locking ring finger tight - with 2 TONNES of preload on the bolt (applied by a press) - I defy anyone to undo the locking ring again without reapplying the preload on the bolt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So i have checked this out. Got the right socket for the bolts but there is nowhere near sufficient  room underneath for me to get the torque wrench in over the top 

Best case scenario is loosening the screw, moving column and retorquing that to the right load.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so turn the  stg.  wheel so the clamp is underneath not above ????

if all you need is to extend the inner column to clear the stg wheel boss  , get a good grip on the wheel and give it a firm tug it should move , and you dont have to disturb anything

but if some muppet has done the grub screw up gorilla hands then i may not shift ,  the clamp is designed to slide under a fair load 

likewise the column outer tube will push down towards the dash , its what its supposed to do 

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...