Jump to content

Inlet Manifold Heater Pipe Leak Repair


Lance Smith
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have a 1979 USA Spitfire single Stromberg engine.  The steel heater pipe that passes through the aluminum inlet manifold is perforated.  I know there are places in the UK (TSSC, Rimmers) that will remove the rusty steel pipe and replace it with a new stainless steel pipe. The European heater pipe configuration is different from the USA version that I have. I attached a pic with indication of heater pipe and leak in yellow.

Are there any recommendations for where to have this done in the USA?
thanks

InletManifoldHeaterPipeLeak.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Lance,

I had this problem and I sorted it myself by fitting a smaller diameter copper pipe inside the perforated pipe. I did this more than 30 years ago and I'm afraid I can't remember the pipe dimension but it probably was 15mm. I thought about using a heat transfer compound (the sort of stuff used between computer processors and heat sinks) but it was a very tight fit and it didn't seem necessary. It's been fine ever since.

Adrian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want the job doing properly contact Ian Gittings (email sponmon64@gmail.com). He advertises on e-bay (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TRIUMPH-GT6-VITESSE-6-CYLINDER-INLET-MANIFOLD-REFURBISHMENT-INC-BANJO-BOLT-ETC/264756318586?hash=item3da4b4d17a:g:DrMAAOSwrk5e3OT5). Also through the US Triumph Experience forum. He is based in the Midlands. Ian bores out the corroded water pipe and replaces with a stainless steel pipe + new stainless connectors on each end. 

No connection, just a satisfied customer.

David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you do use a stainless steel replacement pipe, make sure it comes with the appropriate connectors, as it is very difficult to make rubber heater hose stay put on the shiny smooth surface of the pipe.  I found that the pressure in the system was enough to slowly push the hose off the stainless pipe regardless of how tight the hose clips were done up.  Ideally, the ends need to be knurled to provide enough grip, but this is not easy (or even possible?)with stainless steel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

very valid  point   

thats the only reason metal /plastic coolant pipes have a bell. hump  on their ends rolled or formed   to stop pressure creeping the hoses coming off 

you see this on radiator stubs and thermo hsg.   etc 

its an age old problem . that most dont think about  ,  painted pipes can be equally as slippery  

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the 22nd I advised I had cut the steel pipe off , drilled it out for 2in and tapped the two ends of the manifold heated pipe with 3/8in NPT male threaded and barbed brass fittings, it could be NPT or BSP threads as there nearly the same and I have both?

Here's two pics of the arrangement note the barbed ends to grip the rubber 1/2in hose that is a good fit.

Spit 1500 Inlet Manifold with 0.375in NPT Threaded Offtakes.JPG

Enlargement of 0.375in threaded offtake, 0.5in rubber hose fits well.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the original was cast round the pipe - i.e. the steel pipe was installed in the mould before the alloy was cast over it - then it would certainly have been cheaper to produce than having to incorporate a removable bit of mould and/or drill through the full length to make a pipe in the casting. I don't know whether that's actually how they were made, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Using Peter's method I have modified the 1500 inlet manifold in the same way.

It was nice and cheap to do; a 37/64" twist drill (the tapping size for 3/8 BSP) was only £8.50 mail order from Axminster Tool Centre, and I already had a 3/8 BSP tap.  The brass barbed fittings were a couple of quid from eBay.

Job's a goodun....

inlet manifold.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 25/08/2020 at 09:54, NonMember said:

If the original was cast round the pipe - i.e. the steel pipe was installed in the mould before the alloy was cast over it - then it would certainly have been cheaper to produce than having to incorporate a removable bit of mould and/or drill through the full length to make a pipe in the casting. I don't know whether that's actually how they were made, though.

It was a not uncommon practice, especially with sand cast moulding, came across it a couple of times in Marine Practice over the years, failed miserably when subjected to sea water too. "We" where convinced that the major reason was galvanic action, with the salts increasing the errosion rate. Replaced no end of "alloy" small heat exchanger covers. Mind the (much) larger C-I ones sometimes did no better!.

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Reviving this thread. Just double checking that there is cast aluminium around the old steel pipe? I've cut off the old steel pipe at each end and tapped and drilled two male adapters as per the posts above, but I'm worried if the steel tube inside the manifold rusts then I'll get coolant leaking into the inlet...bad news if so. I highly doubt there isn't cast aluminium around the original steel pipe to safeguard this but just wanted to check! 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I had the front pipe snap off in the middle of a 400 mile drive to the south coast. Luckily I had some 10mm OD copper pipe in the boot and a mallet.

They were there, along with a very long 10mm twist drill because I was sort of expecting it to go and intended to put the pipe in parallel till I could run the drill up the hole and put the pipe through inside.

But it went at the services when I caught it mucking about while checking the oil level. So I had time to shorten the pipe, which was overlong,  drove it in the hole. and then sawed the damaged end off. The jubilee clip went on and there was no leak, and it got us there and around and back, and went on for months till the exhaust one cracked and I took the opportunity to replace it. I assume there was no leak because the copper pipe was sealed by the rust and crap in the steel one.

If there's anything good about it, it is that with the hose on it's not visibly modified.

IMG_20210713_222729.thumb.jpg.f2734cd4c2ab6276efa9f4e3185dcd6f.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...