Jump to content

21 cars that were famously faulty ( including Triumph’s)


Paul H
 Share

Recommended Posts

This has been remarked on at Facebook (Vitesse page).    The entries on Triumphs, at least those I know of, are ignorant and inflammatory, deosgned to get people to  respond.   I belive the word is "Clickbait".   As that is likely to be true of other marques, this should be ignored.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found it quite amusing. Yes, the detail is a tad iffy, but the sentiments are spot on. The comments about the Escort made me laugh. And I got a reminder of the Citroen GS we had when I was young, manual box but no clutch. Clever. 

As to Triumphs, I have met several who had them as new cars, generally the comments are not encouraging.... (rusty outriggers replaced after just a few years from new, that sort of thing)

 

Anyway, nothing malicious about it, just lots of adverts dotted around the pages (guess the magazine has to make money somehow)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Easy to drive, mechanically reliable and charming, the Herald was good news until its chassis went rotten and the rear swing-axle suspension outriggers punched their way through the frilly box-sections, changing the angle of the back wheels and making the handling distinctly leery."

Bit unfair that. How long did it take the car to get THAT rusty? It wasn't Italian, you know. But, yes, treat it as light-hearted fun with as much serious content as a box of cornflakes.

The bit about the VW van is also a bit iffy:

"However, leaves could be sucked into the side-window-height engine air intakes and, if these weren’t removed, could result in burnt-out engine bay disaster. Not such good vibes after all."

Only if you lived somewhere leafy... the whole article is a bit straw-clutching... "Go out and find me a fault with the following cars" sort of thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Load of this stuff is written by people who weren't around at the time. So where does the information come from to write these pieces. Not first hand that's for sure. 

I bought two new Triumphs and had second hand Rootes, all were totally reliable.

A great number of the mechanical problems were due to either a lack of or just very poor maintenance.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

i did 40k in my Imp , cable throttle , never a HG or water pump failure and she pulled over 7 k  in top gear a flier in its day .

90 in 3rd  was easy 

happy days 

Pete

 

I loved my Imp sport as well, 998cc heater wasn't up to much but it was a real flyer. First car i ever got caught by plod, there was eight of us in it :)  A real rollicking i got off these two bobbie's, and well deserved..... Never did it again, they even made my seven mates walk home......

Tony.    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The fact it starts with "Morris Minor: If you didn't grease the bits the manufactuer said needed greasing, when the manufacturer said they needed geasing they would run out of grease and fail" is hardly a good start.

I assume the author also believes:
a) Modern sauce pans are crap - put them on the stove with nothing in and the bottoms melt!
b) Modern household wiring is crap - if you trip all the trip switches none of the sockets work!
c) Modern humans are crap - If you tie a cleap plastic bag over their heads they die in a matter of minutes!

 

I've no idea what car #2 was as I gave up the will to live, plus as it was C&SC I assumed, like the magazine, the next 6 screens would just be expensive watch, etc ads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

thats  a pretty convincing result you tend to remember ...or are frequently   reminded   by all 7 

Pete

Back in the day that's the way it was done; someone usually had THE one car, it was always a Datsun 120Y or the like - we all piled in, eight or nine, off to the nightclub; anyone pulled, he got the car and the rest of us had to make our own way home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Mjit said:

I've no idea what car #2 was as I gave up the will to live, plus as it was C&SC I assumed, like the magazine, the next 6 screens would just be expensive watch, etc ads.

Abso;utley, but have you ever read "Octane"?    It assumes that you have sufficient disposable income to indulge in an annual Ferrari.

MotorSport isn't much better (but MUCH better in editorial content!) They send me near daily  emails advertising posters and model race cars that cost at least £299 each.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to subscribe to one magazine - was it "Popular Classics"? - that merged with C&SC during my subscription. They assured me that I would continue to receive the "same great content and stories". Rubbish. By the first issue of C&SC I realised that, as a Triumph driver of the lower categories I was lesser than the animals of the field. I may have been worthy of some notice if I had owned a race prepared TR2 or TR3 or the like, or if Stirling Moss had once let his shadow fall on my front wing, but otherwise, I was as the dust on the very road. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, well, after that list of calumnies, libels and downright distortions, here's a eulogy to a Triumph!

A kind friend has passed on to me last June's Classic & Sports Car, with article by staff writer Martin Buckley, "Estates of mind".  He's cpomparing the original RangeRover and the Triumph Pi Estate.     And he loves the Triumph!   "An urbanely handsome wagon", "arguably the best looking estate car in Europe"!     "A far handier car to drive than ... the opposition" with " a younger and more thrusting image", he even likes the Pi system, which motoring writers usually love to rubbish.

All thoroughly deserved, of course, and no less than any Pi owner would expect, so I leave it up to them to get hold of a copy and enjoy the thorough self-esteem polish that Mr.Buckley will give them!

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 23/08/2020 at 18:06, mark powell said:

I'm surprised they didn't include the entire range of 1970's Datsuns....  Rust buckets, along with Alfasuds.. 

I think we’re forgetting all cars rusted then.

I had a Mini that would never start if it was damp. Which was most mornings from October to April. Not great when you needed to get to work. Eventually the subframe went like modt Minis.

Replaced it with a Datsun 120Y. Yes it rusted, but it was always reliable. 

My mate had an Imp and he would travel around with a 5 gallon jerrycan of water because it would over heat so often.

Do agree that some on the list are a bit undeserving like the Herald.

Andy S

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Andy S said:

I had a Mini that would never start if it was damp. Which was most mornings from October to April. Not great when you needed to get to work. Eventually the subframe went like modt Minis.

Replaced it with a Datsun 120Y. Yes it rusted, but it was always reliable.

In 1988 I had a neighbour with a boring Japanese car, only a few years old. He would often be out on a cold or damp morning really struggling to get it to start. I drove a Mk1 Vitesse. That started every time. Yes it was in a shocking cosmetic condition but it was always reliable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

I find /found most reliability problems start with the owner ,not the basic car design

As with the Stag - problems allegedly happened with overheating because no-one told the owner / dealer to use antifreeze in the mix... NOT the fault of the car; similarly owners not greasing trunnions, or using rust proofing. Any car of that period would rust, some amazingly quickly, and it should be the job of the owner to prevent it, not the car designer or manufacturer.

Even today on modern cars, we have cars that go for years without oil or filter changes, air intakes and drain holes blocked with leaves, and brake pads worn right down to the backplates. Is THAT the fault of the car or it's designer?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

As with the Stag - problems allegedly happened with overheating because no-one told the owner / dealer to use antifreeze in the mix... NOT the fault of the car; similarly owners not greasing trunnions, or using rust proofing. Any car of that period would rust, some amazingly quickly, and it should be the job of the owner to prevent it, not the car designer or manufacturer.

Even today on modern cars, we have cars that go for years without oil or filter changes, air intakes and drain holes blocked with leaves, and brake pads worn right down to the backplates. Is THAT the fault of the car or it's designer?

As a Stag owner I can definitely say that there is more wrong with them than just not changing the antifreeze. The engine is a disaster waiting to happen. 

I would imagine that most customers of Triumph would have struggled to forgive them if they had bought one.

The management and workforce are both at fault.

Andy S

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...