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Nylon hose / Ethanol resistance


rulloyd
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but there is nylon fuel pipes  its used on all modern cars 

we introduce the first use of nylon air pipe on trucks back in the 70s the first degraded in sunlight as being out in an open chassis these were all coloured , reverted to black with a 

colour printed  in the outer  sorry no idea  ,a about  modern pipes and  ethanol ,  their specification should spell out any restrictions to their useage

and beware of claims on ebay  

pete

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7 hours ago, Paulfc said:

If inexpensive plastic pipe is ethanol proof, why is there such a debate about R9/R14 Specification hose as being the “must have” for safe use?
 

Paul

Because it is more a replacement for the copper/steel fuel pipe, rather than the rubber joining sections. Could be done without rubber, but would be a bit of a faff.

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I used nylon hose on the Vitesse as I omitted fitting the steel pipe when the body was off & to avoid a central rubber pipe joint thro the central outrigger, I strengthened the nylon jointing by using a thin internal stainless steel sleeve in the nylon at the joints so when joining the nylon to steel pipe with rubber pipe the hose clips don't compress  the nylon pipe which would neck at the joint and with time ultimately leak if not supported internally

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2 hours ago, yorkshire_spam said:

I might be halucinating due to being confined indoors for months on end, but I seem to remember the MK1 Freelanders had rigid plastic pipes for the underbody sections of the fuel systems.

You're correct but they're a strange layout - I don't think you could even begin to adapt them for any of our cars - and whatever they're made from, they cost a whopping £500 to replace...

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2 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

You're correct but they're a strange layout - I don't think you could even begin to adapt them for any of our cars - and whatever they're made from, they cost a whopping £500 to replace...

Yeah, I wasn't really saying the freelander ones were suitable for re-use, more trying (clearly badly!) to say that if it's ok for moderns to have plastic fuel pipes from new I don't see any reason why we couldn't replace steel with plastic on our old motors if we felt like it.

 

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36 minutes ago, yorkshire_spam said:

Yeah, I wasn't really saying the freelander ones were suitable for re-use, more trying (clearly badly!) to say that if it's ok for moderns to have plastic fuel pipes from new I don't see any reason why we couldn't replace steel with plastic on our old motors if we felt like it.

 

No worries, I know what you meant. What I was getting was if the material can be identified, then maybe we could obtain suitable quantities of similar to replace our standard metal pipes, but to buy a Freelander set would be pointless as there's no piece long enough for a Triumph to use.

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