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New GT6 MK2 Purchase - Help me improve it further!


avivalasvegas
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Not exactly bolt on then :) 

I'm not a very aggressive driver, and don't expect much brake fade or much wear. And because I don't drive more than 2-3K miles a year, rust prevention is a priority. 

I believe the science is that dimples/ slots aide in cooling while preserving disc integrity. That said, I think it's all marketing mumbo jumbo. I'll share how they perform when they go on car next week.

 

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Just now, avivalasvegas said:

Not exactly bolt on then :) 

I'm not a very aggressive driver, and don't expect much brake fade or much wear. And because I don't drive more than 2-3K miles a year, rust prevention is a priority. 

I believe the science is that dimples/ slots aide in cooling while preserving disc integrity. That said, I think it's all marketing mumbo jumbo. I'll share how they perform when they go on car next week.

 

The RallyDesign ones appear to be a straight fit.

They used to say back in the day's advertising blurb that the dimples helped remove gases from between the pads and the discs and so aid braking; I remember the return argument being: if there's a dimple there's less disc for the pad to grip.

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Just got the car back.  My impressions on the koni shocks and brakes are below.

The blown fuse was caused by an electrical fault that was due to extra gauge wiring installed by a previous owner. Also, the bonnet rattle that has long plagued the car is now entirely gone. The car seems so much more refined and quieter than before, and continues to improve. That said, two new problems have arisen:

1) Interestingly, after some adjustment to the choke to improve cold starting, the car now shudders when idling and occasionally dies. It is by no means a pleasant cold start.  

2) Sadly, the headlight stalk appears to be misbehaving. It doesn't activate high beam or low beam easily anymore but sometimes both come on and sometimes all illumination is turned off entirely. 

Any thoughts? 

 

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  • 1 month later...

In his infinite wisdom, the previous owner (headmaster Barry) had installed low back recliner seats with adjustable headrests from a Mk3 when he restored this Mk2 GT6. The foams have since perished but the leather covers themselves are still good.

To get things as firm and supportive as new, I've since ordered replacement foams from Park Lane Classics as they were £150 cheaper than everyone else, including Newton. I also liked that Owen took the time to review images of my seats to confirm that I was ordering the correct ones. Sadly, I have to wait till the Summer to get them.

image.jpg

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and replace the hog rings with cable (tyraps) ties  

hog rings ..they are nasty little sods to cut and remove always photo every fold and clip so you can replace the foams and get the covers to fit , ti aid dragging covers over new foams use a liner of old net curtain 

you can use bin bag stuff but that can be creaky when you shuffle the bum

just aids the heart attack getting the covers pulled on fully.

any wrinkles stick a wallpaper steamer wand up inside , not so effective on leather 

Pete

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58 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

and replace the hog rings with cable (tyraps) ties  

hog rings ..they are nasty little sods to cut and remove always photo every fold and clip so you can replace the foams and get the covers to fit , ti aid dragging covers over new foams use a liner of old net curtain 

you can use bin bag stuff but that can be creaky when you shuffle the bum

just aids the heart attack getting the covers pulled on fully.

any wrinkles stick a wallpaper steamer wand up inside , not so effective on leather 

Pete

Aviv,

Pete mentions hog rings. If you need some, I've got hog ring pliers and spare hog rings that you're welcome to use.

Alternatively, some use small zip ties in place of traditional hog rings. Seems like a good idea to me, having had experience of using hog rings!

Nigel

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You will not regret getting Owen's stuff. Take care not to bang your head on the roof when you have done the job. I was amazed how different the driving position was after I had fitted mine and was not sitting on the floor. I believe Doug had to increase the rake on his seats after fitting his foams? Not so bad in a soft top.

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21 minutes ago, Badwolf said:

Doug had to increase the rake on his seats after fitting his foams?

Yes! I was previously sitting on frame and webbing, the old foams had crumbled to cat litter. I got my new foams from Owen, well worth the wait, but they raised the sitting position by near 3".  My covers, although grubby and smelling of engine oil and exhaust fumes (car exhaust, OK? :lol:) were not in too bad a condition. I put them through the washing machine and they came out surprisingly well, but I wouldn't recommend that for leather. Although my daughter has just put a sheepskin rug though her machine and it's come out fine.  A couple of years later I got new covers, again from Owen, excellent quality and a very good price.

Doug

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20 hours ago, Badwolf said:

I really must get around to ordering the rest of my interior trim.

Yes! Door cards for me, he does them in the right colour too. In fact I'll get on that today. Spend! Spend! Spend, to save the economy.

Doug

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  • 3 weeks later...

The GT6 is back. The following have been installed

1) Koni rear suspension kit - Low speed ride is much better but at higher speeds the rear is a bit bouncy. Has anyone experienced this? 

2) New Girling clutch master and slave - The failed master cylinder was also a Girling but the slave was aftermarket. Both were leaking.

3) New Transmission oil - Dale uses Smith & Allen. He shared that the old fluid "looked like Christmas lights", which means loads of metal bits in it.  Is this normal for a GT6? Anything I can do to minimize it  - eg. an overdrive friendly additive. 

4) New differential oil - The old fluid had turned black'ish. I plan to add Liqui Moly MOS2 differential additive to it to reduce friction wear.  

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, avivalasvegas said:

3) New Transmission oil - Dale uses Smith & Allen. He shared that the old fluid "looked like Christmas lights", which means loads of metal bits in it.  Is this normal for a GT6? Anything I can do to minimize it  - eg. an overdrive friendly additive. 

4) New differential oil - The old fluid had turned black'ish. I plan to add Liqui Moly MOS2 differential additive to it to reduce friction wear.  

You'll get some metal particles in the gearbox oil but it shouldn't be excessive; after all it has to come off somewhere inside. It may be that it just has not been maintained in a long while, but try a magnetic drain plug and watch what sticks to it - but only after a few oil changes to flush out the old particles. Then you'll know if anything is still being ground off.

As for additives... I was always told to avoid any kind of additive on overdrives, certainly any of the slippery versions that will wreck it - maybe someone here can advise if anything is overdrive safe if needed? Same for the diff - good oil is adequate. Paddocks sell a 140 grade which sadly they won't post to me but I always wanted to try it.

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The metal bits all tend to sit in the bottom of the box, and indeed, it should have a magnetic drain plug which comes out covered in a thick layer of tiny steel particles. All quite normal, as hardly anybody changes the oil in a gearbox or diff.

Dale has PLENTY of experience over the years of prepping cars for all sorts of events, so I would be happy with his choice of oil. But do not use additives, they are not needed or desirable. 

As to the Konis, they are adjustable, and therein lies a problem. Setting them to suit an individual. They may be set too soft for your driving, and need adjusting. Which is a bit of a faff with Koni as they need to be undone at one end or maybe taken off the car. Not difficult though. And don't be tempted to make the over-hard, maybe up a couple of clicks. But too soft is very preferable to too hard, especially at the rear

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I have Gaz rear shockers on my Vitesse and they are set on 2 . Scale is 1 to 10 . They were initially set to 4 then saw my 10 year old grand daughter bouncing about in the rear seat 😱

Paul 

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2 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

As for additives... I was always told to avoid any kind of additive on overdrives, certainly any of the slippery versions that will wreck it - maybe someone here can advise if anything is overdrive safe if needed? Same for the diff - good oil is adequate. Paddocks sell a 140 grade which sadly they won't post to me but I always wanted to try it.

Dale shared this as well for overdrive transmissions. He also shared that the previous owner was very wise to swap from the D type overdrive to the J type. 

He was not opposed to using this MOS2 additive in the rear differential. I have used this on other cars with great success & will try it next.

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never any addatives to improve slip unless you want a slipping OD clutch 

the OD basic spec is to use engine oil as other marques do  the problem is the gearbox wont last well and triumph had agreement with laycock to use EP90 

ive had a good few Dtypes never a problem the only one to play up was when i bought the 2000 with a J type and the solenoid shuttle was stuffed so the OD had a mind of it own with In /out all by its self

cheap to fix but out of 4 Dtypes and 1 J type its the J that needed attention

the J is of a better design and handles more torque than the D but they all do a good job

Both OD have a coarse filter and magnetic rings to collect fine debris but doesnt mean the particles are from the OD as the oil capacity is fully shared so more likely  it cam from clashing gears 

pete

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others that do spec engine oil dont have the same life expectance layshaft and tip bearings and tooth profiles 

dating from way back in time 

we all know the weak points  why chance a non EP oil 

sure an engine oil  will clear from the sychro quicker than an EP oil but they and the rest of the box is built around using an extreme pressure oil due to inherant short comings 

they even spec'd ep90 in the standard 8 where some of this began life back in the 50s

i dont see the need to mess with base oil specs  . whats the gain ???

Pete

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