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Anyone know what this is ?


Pbruce9393
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Hi,

I’ve been trying to tidy up the dashboard wiring in my GT6, as previous work appears to be a bit haphazard to say the least. There are no parcel shelves fitted, only blank panels to conceal the rats nest of wiring behind. I have already found what turned out to be an ignition cut off switch hanging loose by cable tie behind the passenger side, and I also have this at the drivers side. It is some sort of rotary adjuster for something, but what ? It connects to a metal tube, which disappears into the back of the driver side dashboard. Without removing the facia, it is impossible to see where it goes to. At first I thought about it being a dimmer for the gauges, but it appears to do nothing when “adjusted”.

Any ideas ?648D5C92-8C26-4F69-AF6C-2BF4AF3FA12E.thumb.jpeg.670a2fd1a454416b128e640547e29213.jpeg

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13 minutes ago, Pbruce9393 said:

I have beared the cold & checked tonight. Well done guys. That is exactly what it is. It works if pushed in first (which requires a second hand to push against due to precarious installation) as suggested.

thanks again for clearing the mystery up

Peter

Are the attached wires earth wires 

Paul 

 

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what heathen would use a white wire for earth! 

must admit I've used red wire in place of the official positive Triumph supply white, green, brown or purple, at least it says I'm live/positive! But in later life I am going back and fixing up my earlier youthful errors, you can do that when you've owned the car 50 years! and any extra access's are independently fused thro separate fuse box's next to the original.

waiting to be loudly down cried!

 

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15 hours ago, dougbgt6 said:

Yes, that is the GT6 trip adjuster/reset position and I recognise the black knurled bezel. BUT, that's not the original nob, which is black plastic and why are there wires, It's mechanical?!!

Doug

Black plastic? Interesting. I have one installed and a spare in the shed and both have metal knurled knobs. Did the bean counters get to your's?! 🤣

Gully

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Bruce,

Please try to be more specific, or else take beter pics.
you talked about the wiring, showed us this  adjuster, and that "It connects to a metal tube, which disappears into the back of the driver side dashboard" 

What you didn't say is that the tube was flexible, and directly connected to the back of the knob!   No wires going into the tube at all!   And those in your pic pure red herrings!!

Of course Doug is correct, but he must posses extrasenory powers to divinate that from your description!

Unless it's just that I'm thick today.

John

 

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1 hour ago, Gully said:

Black plastic? Interesting. I have one installed and a spare in the shed and both have metal knurled knobs.

The early ones were metal knurled knobs. The ones fitted on Spitfire 1500 and Dolomites were black plastic. I don't know when they changed over but I've ended up with a black plastic one on my Spitfire, from combining bits of different speedos to get one that worked and is roughly the right gearing.

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On 06/12/2020 at 20:56, Peter Truman said:

what heathen would use a white wire for earth!

Americans!!. ALL the 12V Neutral/earthing on the R-V`s was white!. Black was Positive!.  Some US mains wiring too is Black (LIVE) Green (EARTH) and White (Neutral) (The second phase of a 3 phase is Red.)

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Peter I said heathens! I worked several times in the mid 60's to early 70's working in Canada and US as in all over the world it takes all types, but some of their senior managers were hard to get on with!

My parents spent some time in the States mid to late 60's so when they returned to the UK they brought quite a lot of 110v appliances so they had several rooms in their UK house eg Kitchen, TV room, bathroom and garage/workshop wired for 110 and 240volt supplies, they had their own 240 to 110 volt transformer big bugger mounted in the garage, wonder what wiring the UK electrician used?

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11 hours ago, Peter Truman said:

they had their own 240 to 110 volt transformer big bugger mounted in the garage,

It needs to be a big bugger, even if you're not using "all that much" 110V power. My brother has been struggling with this as one of the products his company makes has a big hefty transformer that can be run on 110V (auto-switching) so he feels he should test them in that configuration. Unfortunately, to make it work reliably, the 240 to 110 step-down transformer needs to be an order of magnitude heftier than the load transformer, and that's a real beast in his application.

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1 hour ago, NonMember said:

It needs to be a big bugger, even if you're not using "all that much" 110V power. My brother has been struggling with this as one of the products his company makes has a big hefty transformer that can be run on 110V (auto-switching) so he feels he should test them in that configuration. Unfortunately, to make it work reliably, the 240 to 110 step-down transformer needs to be an order of magnitude heftier than the load transformer, and that's a real beast in his application.

Yes it was, as it also ran an evaporative cooler which cooled the top floor of the quite large house. Package also included selected ducting I remember getting into the roof and measuring up so he could order the hardware. I reckon it was the only house in North York’s which had cooling.

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Yup! Dad worked for BA and was posted to the Boeing factory in Seatle. Time came to come home and they brought EVERYTHING on a delivery Jumbo flight, a walk in fridge, assorted white goods and, their car! Dad installed a 110v transformer in the garage (a 2 foot cube!) and installed American sockets.  

db

 

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18 hours ago, Peter Truman said:

Peter I said heathens! I worked several times in the mid 60's to early 70's working in Canada and US as in all over the world it takes all types, but some of their senior managers were hard to get on with!

My parents spent some time in the States mid to late 60's so when they returned to the UK they brought quite a lot of 110v appliances so they had several rooms in their UK house eg Kitchen, TV room, bathroom and garage/workshop wired for 110 and 240volt supplies, they had their own 240 to 110 volt transformer big bugger mounted in the garage, wonder what wiring the UK electrician used?

As a child, our radio was an American 110V job, 'modified' for UK 240V - by the mains lead being of resitance wire!  Gosh that wire got hot!

John

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