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A MK3 GT6: Selling for quite the sum!


avivalasvegas
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Astronomical, but someone with money to burn will buy it. I don't see where the value is in that price.

I was watching this one, for sale locally, and I see the price has dropped from £14000 to £11000. If I was buying one I wouldn't pay much more.

https://www.gumtree.com/p/other-cars/1972-triumph-gt6-mk3-/1388715380

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6 hours ago, dougbgt6 said:

And it’s got pancake air filters, they are bling and not as effective as the original.

Pancake filters! I'll have you know they are more than bling...they sound good too! ;)

I don't find the MK3 as attractive so would never pay that price. I believe a MK2 did actually sell for close to that price recently!

 

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What can I say... I wouldn't sell my GT6 for £27k, it's worth more than that to me!

Which raises the question, what price would tempt me? Not an E Type Jag, I've heard a few stories of GT6 owners who 'upgraded' to an E Type and regretted their choice.

But a DB5, that might do it!

Nigel

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Has a comparison/ test/ review between an e-type and a GT6 ever been done? I'd have imagined the Jaguar would have won that round due to the increased power.

One thing's for sure, the GT6 is rarer, with so few made and even fewer surviving. I expect the car will rapidly appreciate as more people learn about them.

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We have a Mk2 Spit which is a pleasure to drive, with fantastic legroom & I'm 6ft 2 and portly, relatively easy to get into and out, it has a comfortable seat even tho basic, & we can drive 3 hours without a stop, so I presume the GT6 is similar, except access with a fixed roof may infringe access for the taller person, I know getting into the passenger seat ain't easy, but that I think is normal for all cars when your used to being the driver!

By comparison I have frequently driven a Series 2 E Type roadster, its hard to get into and the legroom is at best restrictive, power oh yeh plenty, but long trips are a NO NO! 

Price comparison here a good GT6 $30k, vs a good Series 2 E Type roadster around $200k, the one I get to drive is concour and worth $250k, and yes I prefer the GT6, style and easy/cheap to fix, I'm a practicalist. Re looks the E Type Coupe is beautiful, the roadster not so attractive, but the GT6 also has style but not it's beauty, and Oh Yes I prefer the Gt6 Mk2, ie roundtail style with rotaflex. 

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Not much point having a car that will do 150 mph these days...

I always remember being amazed at the variation in prices; we have Club cars selling for £3000 - £5000, we had dealer cars selling for £8000 - £10000 and then we have Classic and Sportscar prices of £20000 - £25000. Just because they're more expensive doesn't mean they're better; in many cases you're paying for the dealer's overheads and his so-called aftercare and warranty. I know some people like originality and will pay a premium for it but when you get cars for sale and the seller has, at great pains, sourced the original Metalastik suspension bushes and original Stanpart brake pads and is charging accordingly then you have to wonder firstly if anyone really knows the difference and secondly if the new owner is going to replace them with upgrades to help with the driving experience... especially if they're the original rubber fuel lines and a fifty year old wiring loom...

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11 hours ago, avivalasvegas said:

with so few made and even fewer surviving.

A brief check on the inter web appears to reveal 67k E types and 42k GT6s were built, not that much different. However, Howmanyleft shows 7k E types and 1.5k GT6s surviving. 

So

E type survival rate 10%
GT6 survival rate 2%

Makes you think.
 

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2 minutes ago, johny said:

 Same reason its now harder to find base models of some classic cars than the sporty versions.... 

The fault lying squarely with Practical Classics, Wheeler Dealers and the like. 

"We don't want boring old family saloons so let's convert ours to look like sporty versions." It's refreshing to go to local shows and actually see original unmolested family saloon cars that we all remember.

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5 minutes ago, johny said:

Dont think theyre ever going to be worth more than the sporty versions though because thats what everybody lusted after in their youth😍

Indeed. That is why Fords fetch so much, we can all remember the escorts  RS2000 etc on Grandstand on a saturday afternoon, and (despite some iffy shenanigans) winning the endurance rallies. Lets face it, as a spotty yoof you could hardly get excited about a Triumph 2000 (though maybe a Spitfire, ideal for impressing young ladies) And it all those memories which drive prices on fairly common cars.

I remember allegros (I learnt to drive in one), maxis woleslys and so on. If I see one, I usually wonder what on earth the attraction of ownership is. I guess personal stuff, but many of those cars have very little of note.  Bit like te Toyota we owned, I always reckoned anybody who wanted one needed to be shot, they are a head over heart purchase. 

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1 hour ago, Colin Lindsay said:

The fault lying squarely with Practical Classics, Wheeler Dealers and the like. 

"We don't want boring old family saloons so let's convert ours to look like sporty versions." It's refreshing to go to local shows and actually see original unmolested family saloon cars that we all remember.

As a freelance magazine contributor, I feel the need to stick up for my biggest client...

Practical Classics do indeed show sporty classic models, even modified like my GT6 but they also show many everyday cars in each issue. I have the December issue on my desk and flicking through the pages, cars featured include an Austin 1300, there's a buyer's guide on the Austin A30/A35, a pair of Austin Maxis, Citroen 2CVs, even a Daewoo Matiz and Reliant Rebel. On page 86 editor Danny Hopkins has just started a story about his recently acquired Marina 1.3 which he plans to restore, and that's certain to be seen even more in future copies as the project progresses.

That's just this issue of Practical Classics, but there really are plenty of everyday classics in every issue.

Please criticise when it's justified but on this particular topic...

Nigel

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3 minutes ago, Nigel Clark said:

Please criticise when it's justified but on this particular topic...

Nigel

Sorry Nigel, it's my own opinion but based on memories of a magazine I haven't bought in years, the reason being I was tired of hot hatches and boy racer stuff which seemed to be the majority of cars featured. The Peugeot 205 was always the GTi, the Escort was the XR3i, it always seemed to be the sporty versions and even older more 'sedate' British cars such as the Maestro or Montego had to be the MG version. Would it be cynical to say that family saloons are now coming back in vogue since the hot hatches are way beyond the buying power of many?

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3 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

Would it be cynical to say that family saloons are now coming back in vogue since the hot hatches are way beyond the buying power of many?

That may be so with some magazines, and for some classic owners.

Danny has been editor at Practical Classics for 10 years and I know his policy has always been to include an eclectic mix of cars, some glamorous like his Jensen Interceptor, so less so like his Marina.

Nigel

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5 minutes ago, avivalasvegas said:

Back on topic, I can now confirm that the highest paid for a GT6 Mk2 was £25K in 2020. Admittedly in excellent condition, similar to the Mk3 listing above if not slightly more original. With that information, would the seller be able to get anything close to his asking price?

In my opinion, the answer to your question has to be no, because:

- Mk3 GT6s don't attract quite such high prices as the earlier cars.

- This example is in Magenta, a Marmite colour, which will likely limit the number of potential buyers.

- For such a high price, any buyer has the right to expect near-concours condition. This one has some (minor) imperfections.

Nigel

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