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Rear hub inner seal


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Sorry, another axle question...

I'm assembling the rear hubs onto the shaft.  According to the shop manual, the rear hub inner oil seal should be drifted into the trunnion block with the seal lips trailing.  Is that correct?  Every other seal I've fitted in the past has the lip trailing ON THE SHAFT, not in the housing.  The spring side is always on the 'oil' side, in my experience.  Either my thinking's gone awry, or pressing the seal in the trunnion with the lip trailing will allow oil (well, grease) to pass through the seal easily.  Does this seal defy every other seal I've fitted?  I seem to remember my old GT6 always had a grease-encrusted shaft, so maybe...

Am I going mad?

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It is easy to get carried away with the grease and pump in too much as nobody ever thinks the two strokes (or whatever it is) is enough. Even with this design its not a bad idea to have the drums off at the same time just to check.... 

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Sorting through my toolbox, I found that I actually possess an original Churchill tool S304, used for drifting the outer bearing onto the halfshaft.  So, I duly used it, and the bearing/outer trunnion face ended up pretty much on 2.625" from the end of the shaft, as shown in the diagram in the workshop manual.  However....  the trunnion is now a good half inch away from the dust shield, which I drifted on the required distance.  If I trial-fit the rear hub on the tapered end of the shaft, it doesn't go on fully and is loose, so when it's tightened up with the nut it will press the trunnion further along the halfshaft.  Is this intentional, or have I got something wrong?

Thanks!

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I think this has come up before but I cant remember the conclusion however the trunnion must go on far enough to allow the hub to pull up tight on its taper so there could be an error in the workshop manual (not unheard of). Another possibility is that that distance is just to allow the hub to go on and avoids the trunnion being pushed on too far, then on tightening its automatically moved to the correct place....

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6 minutes ago, johny said:

Another possibility is that that distance is just to allow the hub to go on and avoids the trunnion being pushed on too far, then on tightening its automatically moved to the correct place....

 not a possibility  ....  its correct    pulling the hub up tight  finally positions everything 

there is no register on the shaft the bearing can be pressed on anywhere if you wanted to ,

just amazes me it all holds together when you do a  tight loaded turn  on a roundabout that the shaft doesnt decide to shift up the shaft ... but it doesnt 

Pete

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1 minute ago, Pete Lewis said:

 just amazes me it all holds together when you do a  tight loaded turn  on a roundabout that the shaft doesnt decide to shift up the shaft ... but it doesnt 

Pete

Thanks again all - now you come to mention it Pete, I used to have a great mate who ran a company near me called East Anglian Sports Cars.  He specialized in TRs, winning the old Benson & Hedges concours several times back in the eighties.  I vaguely remember him saying he never understood how the small Triumph rear wheel bearings were supposed to work...

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not forgetting front wheel bearing should rotate on the stub axle and the  rear trunnion bearing rotates in the trunnion bearing housing 

 so  they can be stripped out and road impact point changes as the front  inner track and rear outer tracks turn slowly 

its a basic concept used on many cars of the era 

pete

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