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exploding petrol tank


Unkel Kunkel
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The latest  Veteran Car Club of GB mag.   details an explosion that happened whilst one of their members was   repairing a petrol  tank he had removed from a car.

It threw him several yards and the mangled tank flew down his garden.

He was very lucky to escape with his life,  a broken collar bone , two broken  ribs and second degree burns to his face and an arm.

Apparently, whilst preparing the tank for repair, a hair dryer was used to  speed things up...

.. Yes, OK , Obviously not a good thing to do- but I think it was very admirable of him to admit this  and share it as a warning. 

- Please don’t underestimate the risk with fuel tanks.They can be welded / soldered but only after a methodical and careful sequence of preparation.

 

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does this just prove fuel doesnt      ......Go  off   with age ,.       but does with a hair dryer  

 

quite different but a  guy from the factory   had  his car on bricks to remove gearbox , the car rocked and fell and trapped him , punctured the fuel tank which exploded  as the paraffin heater took hold of the spillage 

the guy didnt make it .  

we rely on this stuff  but often without real cause for concern of our safety 

stay  safe 

Pete

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The level of his injuries are relatively minor when assessed in light of the potential. Another "lucky" cat, with only 8 lives left!.

Many years ago, when first married, We lived near a scrap yard. The owners son was killed cutting up an old railway oil tank that had lain empty for many years!. The explosion rocked our House several hundred yards away!, Rude awakening, I was in bed, being having been on night shift.

Pete

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I have always had respect for fuel tanks having watched older apprentices "setting" them off on disused land. The bang was incredible especially if someone had put a small bag of acetylene in before hand. It seemed fun at the age of 15yrs fresh from school........ It did teach me not to mess with them at close range.

Tony. 

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1 minute ago, Pete Lewis said:

as youngsters we (thought we had ) filled a 5 gallon drum with gas .   far better than teachers cocoa tin experiment

it blew as we lit the vent hole  i can still see the flash 

with no eyebrows or fringe Mum wasnt impressed 

Pete

I don't think we would get away with it now Pete :) 

Tony.

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The Dutch have indulged for many years in celebrating the  New Year by 'Carbide schieten'.     Traditionally using milk churns with a football jammed in the top, which makes a very satisfactory bang, plus a harmless(ish) projectile, they are scaled up these days.  No wonder Jacob is deaf now!

 

 

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30 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

depends who knows    Ha 

we all did some questionable learning which wont happen with the screen obsessed   kids of today 

what happened to  adventure ???

Pete

Exactly Pete, unless the screen explodes of course :)  Has anyone set fire to someones paper whilst they were reading it? Great fun in the canteen..... To many fire alarms and sprinklers now.

Tony.  

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2 hours ago, poppyman said:

I have always had respect for fuel tanks having watched older apprentices "setting" them off on disused land. The bang was incredible especially if someone had put a small bag of acetylene in before hand. It seemed fun at the age of 15yrs fresh from school........ It did teach me not to mess with them at close range.

Tony. 

A great mate of mine once demolished an old mill chimney with drums of thinners. The chimney came down alright, with quite a few parts of it going through roofs and windows quite some distance away.

He got the idea from his previous workplace in Banbridge Motorworks, where they exploded a tin of thinners in a pile of old tyres - the instructions were to burn off all the old thinners, presumably the unused stuff which would have gone off or been a fire risk over the weekend; he poured it into one tin, placed a stack of tyres over it like a chimney, and on top he placed a Landrover bonnet complete with spare wheel. The bonnet flew clean over the roof and came down in the next street, through the roof of a hairdresser's. He ended up in court and got a substantial fine...

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we had a inspector who loved the smell of used baccy tins  so we put a dead mouse in one and left it carefully place for him to find

when the lid came off the honk was dreadful    all from such a small little mouse .  like a thick green mist ...a real stench hung around for days 

Pete

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One near miss, one not.

My sisters ex as a kid threw a safe off the top of a tower block, just to see if he could open it. It didn't open and left a big dent in a path below. He was lucky he didn't kill someone below! 

One not, someone I worked with liked to work on his car. Jacked it up and went under, the Jack failed. He lived with his grandad who had gone away for the week. He laid under the car all week before he was found. Please support the car before going under.

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As young teenagers we used to make our versions of hand grenades, old soda syphon bulbs we drilled the end out to make the hole bigger then poured gunpowder into them then a wick all without using any steel so no spark then rode down to the banks of the mighty Yarra here in Melbourne dug into the banks lit the fuse and run like hell we would blow around 3 at a time I reckon over a period we could have diverted the rivers route they did that much damage.

We made our own gunpowder and when dad, a Chem Eng found 1.5 lbs of it in our home workshop, talk about fuming I really got into trouble at school ( one of Melb’s premier private schools) over that episode was on report for a couple of terms. Trouble was dad knew the headmaster well and he lived near us.

 

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Gunpowder?  Pfui!    We made explosive from sugar and a well-known garden chemical, that I think is no longer available for exactly this reason.     Made excellent pipe bombs, but also could fuel spectacular fireworks if packed into a cardboard tube with some magnesium ribbon now and then  along it.

Less lethal was the "Syrup Tin Experiment" that our chemistry teacher showed us, vary much in this fashion:

 

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48 minutes ago, Peter Truman said:

As young teenagers we used to make our versions of hand grenades,

 

29 minutes ago, JohnD said:

Gunpowder?  Pfui!    We made explosive from sugar and a well-known garden chemical, that I think is no longer available for exactly this reason.    

Yes, I think I dodged most of those in my youth. When HM Gov tightened up on dynamite and gelignite over here in the early 1970s we had a variety of home-made stuff demolishing our town centres, the first being CO-OP,  a mix of Sodium Chlorate and Nitrobenzine, so called as it demolished the CO-OP in Belfast. They then moved on to ANFO, a mix of Ammonium Nitrate (sourced from fertilisers) and Fuel Oil, and this proved successful for a time, but then some foreign chappie imported Semtex which really took the fun out of things. The current batch of ne'er-do-wells are using hydrogen peroxide and acid which were easily available on the high street - the London Bus Bombings being one such example of how effective they are. Even these days some of it really is trial and error using stuff stolen from school chemistry labs.

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Well we obviously like explosions !
It  is remarkable  we lot of hooligans reached adulthood with the full complement of eyes ears fingers etc.!

Some of us experimented with nitrogen triiodide  N13

 Easily made  (best skip that  bit)  and left in tiny wet patches here and there on a school corridor. 

As it dries it becomes   explosive - a very sensitive contact explosive  -so much so that even dust settling on it will cause an a very  loud, sharp CRACK! (but not very powerful)  explosion and a tiny purple puff  of iodine.

(With something a little of sugary to attract, it is possible to make a very cruel form of flypaper,  I understand)

A  treated lengthy corridor,  dried in time  for the lesson change,  caused havoc.

The usual suspects were hauled in.Trying to keep an innocent, yet surprised and slightly puzzled expression as episodic explosions   continued to echo  from the cordoned-off corridor as interrogation proceeded proved too difficult for me as my brief smile was spotted to escape...

 

 

 

 

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