Jump to content

Rear springs and drive shafts


Recommended Posts

Evening all,

So is there a correlation between short drive shafts and early car springs? I'm thinking about camber angles and imagining that early car springs don't swing. But are possibly shorter. Therefore if I use a later "swing" spring with short shafts I'll get more camber and potential tuck! Which nobody wants. Can anyone Shine a light on correct spring / shaft length combinations?

Regards Johno

Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think its the spring length that changes the camber directly as all it does is change the angle of the upright while the trunnion and axle stays the same. Therefore a longer spring might push the upright into contact with the brake backplate or tyre.

Where there is a change is in the deflection of the spring as the further the wheel is away from the diff the more bending moment is applied. A short shaft with long spring means there'll be less deflection and the car will sit higher which in turn changes the halfshaft angle to give less negative camber....

Link to post
Share on other sites

The long shaft pushed the wheels outwards, so if you imagine the upright hanging on the spring, it will be more of a negative angle. Theoretically you should get less tuck under as the wheel will be more negatively angled, out at the bottom. 

The springs are all the same length throughout.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes there might be some confusion here as the two swing spring part numbers given by Canley, supposedly for long and short shafts, are shown on the Teglerizer site as being for Spitfire (IV and 1500) and GT6 (late MkIII). Teglerizer says they have different thickness leaves which makes sense giving the difference in weight of the two models rather than different lengths....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...