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Replacement dashboard instrument lights


Robin
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Robin,

As Roger says no relays required, in fact they use far less power than filament bulbs.

And, much as I like to support the club shop their LED instruments bulbs are eye wateringly expensive, £10 EACH! the same things are on Ebay for £3 each. I can tell you that they are identical and  just as good as I converted 2 years ago with no problems.

Doug

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On 07/02/2021 at 11:07, Colin Lindsay said:

For dash lights ie oil, full beam etc go for the flat versions that point in one direction only. I can see my blue full beam warning lamp now!

Obviously for gauges you need the ones that shine 360 degrees. I changed all of my GT6 green bulbs to LED white and they look very nice at night.

Hi Colin - where did you get the blue HB led bulb from ?

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1 hour ago, Pete Lewis said:

i dont think colin had blue led just a  bright white behind the dial Blue jewel

Pete

 

Correct! Just the white led shining through the blue glass jewel. Far, far brighter than the old bulb - as I mentioned earlier, it's the one that has a flat end with all of the diodes facing forwards.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Have replaced all of the dash lights with led versions and must admit they are much better. The only problem is that the led for the  red ignition light stays on constantly when the engine is running so I’ve switched this bulb back to the original and all is fine. I’m assuming that you can’t use a led replacement for the ignition bulb?

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Just now, Robin said:

Have replaced all of the dash lights with led versions and must admit they are much better. The only problem is that the led for the  red ignition light stays on constantly when the engine is running so I’ve switched this bulb back to the original and all is fine. I’m assuming that you can’t use a led replacement for the ignition bulb?

 

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yes that can happen  the circuit senses the voltage

way back when diesels were low rpm and alternators were a bit new fangled we put a 2watt ignition bulbs  in to lower the cut in rpm 

or you were at half revs before the lamp went out 

so dont know about a modern unit but the bulb was important 

Pete

 

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12 hours ago, daverclasper said:

Does this mean if the the bulbs blown or not sufficient, it won't supply the alternator/dynamo to work?.

Cheers , Dave  

Dave - thought that might be the case. So if I keep the original filament bulb for the ignition light but keep LEDs for all of the others then that should be ok?

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43 minutes ago, Badwolf said:

Now you have me worried. I replaced all my dash bulbs on the spit with LEDs about 3 years ago. I'm sure I did the ignition warning as well. No problems up to now. Must go and check.....well, when it gets warmer!!

NO! don't go looking for trouble! Trouble will find you easy enough 😲

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58 minutes ago, Badwolf said:

Now you have me worried

Sometimes you might, maybe, get away with it.

Traditional alternators use a "field winding" on the rotor to generate the rotating field that makes the AC voltage on the fixed windings that passes through the diode pack to charge the battery. The field winding is controlled by the regulator, so that when you don't need much power it just reduces the field strength. It's supplied by a second set of diodes, off the same fixed windings. This is great as long as it's working, but until you've got some field in the rotor there's no power being generated to feed that supply, so no current to create the field. This is where the ignition warning light comes in. It's connected from ignition switch to the top if the field winding. When working, both ends are at around battery voltage, so no light. When stationary (no field supply generated) the bulb has voltage across it, so it lights up, but more importantly it also supplies some current to the field winding to get it started.

Some alternators end up with enough residual magnetism in the rotor armature to kick start themselves. If yours is like that you'll probably "get away with" an LED.

Modern alternators usually have far too much electronics built in and no longer rely on that design. So with one of those you may be OK with an LED too.

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