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State of my fingers.


Jeffds1360
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48 minutes ago, Jeffds1360 said:

:) I'm a Geordie, man !!!

barrier cream for those south of Hadrian's wall.....

I wear snazzy orange ones when I remember, which is usually after I've started something... however for oil changes I always wear gloves, as I usually end up covered with the stuff and it's not good for you.

My clothes tend to suffer more than I do, I'm very sore on jeans.

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2 hours ago, JohnD said:

Its so 5":!'!! cold I'm wearing nitryl gloves (oil resistant) under fingerless mechanics gloves.    Good combination, but my fingertips still hurt!

 

That is wha t I do most of the time, outer gloves can be very oily, but hands stay clean and the nitrile gloves last a long time

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That looks sore!
The sort of dry cracked skin is a problem where the skin is being effectively becoming “de-greased”  and dehydrated - often after frequent hand washing and will trouble most people if  solvents are used.Be especially careful re brake / carb cleaner, petrol,  brake fluid.
Some people have to be especially careful re cement as it dehydrates, is extremely alkaline (and repeated exposure can produce a chromium hypersensitivity) 

Once established,  it becomes almost cyclical as cracks take longer to heal.

It should respond to using emollient cream  well massaged in several times a day and avoiding solvent contact  and  while your skin is like this avoid the use of detergent  soaps -don’t wash your hands with washing up liquid or detergent gel from push top bottles-just go for ordinary soap for now.

There are lots and lots of emollients:

In general, creams  are less  greasy than ointments.  

Double Base cream, E45, Unguentum M, Aquous cream BP

Use them after hand washing and several times a day to leave the skin with just a hint  of greasiness.

I would  be a bit wary of Swarfega, particularly the original type - it certainly clears oil and grease but  also can do something rather similar on skin that has become damaged and vulnerable - I would go for Comma’s Manista instead.

The advice re barrier cream is sensible though I have never had much success.

Nitrile gloves are useful, so that less  cleaning is required but give your hands a “breather “ now and then by changing them  to let them “dry out” otherwise the skin gets wet and “ macerated “making the condition worse.

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Great advice Unkel. I will pay heed. Just pinched some of wor lasses hand cream. I seem to be losing layers of skin! Gloves on tomorrow.  Only got a 'misfire' to sort in No 4. Got spark, got compression but no 'power' from it... weird.

Thanks

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one of our safety officers solved the cracked finger syndrome.

by testing a guillotine and chopped a pinky off  in the process 

at least he couldn't  point or wave a finger if we were breaking the rules 

we cracked up . well he wasn't popular 

Pete

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I tend to use two nitrile gloves - when the top pair split, put a new one on - hands keep clean then - But I also do let my hands out to breath every now and then.

I do have some thicker gloves that I wear over a nitrile glove if the work is quite heavy on the hands - but I have found they rub my knuckle raw if I'm not careful! Can't win!

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Have to say, I have suffered from this more so in the last decade - I wonder if it is often down to dehydration, not drinking enough water.

When in the garage I wear nitrile gloves having first given my hands a good dose of O'Keeffe's Working Hands barrier cream. With the gloves on it seems to help the cream absorb better in to the skin - especially on the knuckles and where the skin is thinnest on the hand. In my experience it works very well for me.

For general use when not in the garage, I use Neutrogena Fast Absorbing hand cream, as required, it is excellent stuff with the added benefit of being non-greasy.

Cannot say the combination is 100% effective but I reckon it is certainly 90% at least. 

Probably the key factor is to ensure that your hands are kept moisturised, rather than applying the creams when required - of which it will always be playing catch-up and the effectiveness somewhat diminished.

Regards.

Richard. 

  

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10 minutes ago, classiclife said:

Have to say, I have suffered from this more so in the last decade - I wonder if it is often down to dehydration, not drinking enough water.

It's down to age (apologies!); skin doesn't heal as easily when it gets older, and is less flexible. 

My father-in-law chopped the end of a finger off on a press, and took it into the house intending to have it sewed back on... however he lost it, so just got the shortened finger cleaned and stitched at hospital. While he was away, my brother in law came home and found the finger on the kitchen floor, which he says really put him off his tea... 

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1 minute ago, Colin Lindsay said:

It's down to age (apologies!); skin doesn't heal as easily when it gets older, and is less flexible. 

No apology required and yes that is the case for me..................... in fact my whole body seems less flexible !!

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10 minutes ago, 68vitesse said:

Death solves all complaints but the cure is worse than the disease.

Trying to persuade myself to go and do somthing but its -1.2C outside with wind chill -5.4C.

Regards

Paul.

High wind, lovely sunny day but bitingly cold, so I was out sweeping leaves. I've never seen so many as fell last Autumn, they're everywhere, but the great thing is: windy day, brush them up a bit and off they fly across the fields to annoy someone else.

Of course, when the wind changes, they all come back again...

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1 hour ago, Colin Lindsay said:

It's down to age (apologies!); skin doesn't heal as easily when it gets older, and is less flexible. 

My father-in-law chopped the end of a finger off on a press, and took it into the house intending to have it sewed back on... however he lost it, so just got the shortened finger cleaned and stitched at hospital. While he was away, my brother in law came home and found the finger on the kitchen floor, which he says really put him off his tea... 

One of the Deck hands, "lost" a part finger fortunately just before arrival Immingham. He was rushed ashore keeping the end of his finger in his mouth. The hospital sewed it back.!. I "lost" a small finger end playing cowboys and indians aged 9. My "buddy" freed me with an Axe!. This was before the days of "elf n safty". When small boys played with all sorts of things now banned, like my Air pistol. (10 years old), Air rifle 13, and Shotgun, well before I left school, we used to wildfowl on the Humber with my mate`s older brothers. The "authorities" would be having a fit now!.

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4 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

One of our safety officers solved the cracked finger syndrome.

by testing a guillotine and chopped a pinky off  in the process 

I worked with a bloke in the RAF who lost two adjacent fingers from the knuckle, at school playing 'dare' with the guillotine in the metalwork shop with a mate. The dare was who could leave their fingers in it longest, before the other guy pulled the handle...Ahem !

It was very amusing going to a new pub and watching people's reaction when he played pool, as the missing digits happened to be the one's he used with the cue!

Gav

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