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Tax and MOT historic vehicles


Pete Lewis
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That's the argument between Nationalisation and Privatisation in a nutshell... :)

Over here they're Government run so monstrously expensive, if a lightbulb blows they bring in entire teams for costings and to check the impact on workers etc and the staff go out at the drop of a hat if anything is even slightly below par, but they're scrupulously monitored.

If they privatised it, same as the mainland, they'd all end up run by paramilitaries or criminals who would work day and night by candlelight but give any old banger an MOT at mate's rates. 

 

 

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Im not ducking the MOT its an  essential but this year of little usage i decided to go with the exempt rules  its normal date would be june time and will get checked over , its the only way to check the brake balance etc

yes the small print says "may be exempt "  and the main tax site says no mot results  which is more representative of where we are

note she has passed every mot since we got her in 2014 

 image.thumb.png.996b92ec161cdc5306fb075dd26be7eb.png

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  • 2 months later...
On 28/02/2021 at 14:45, johny said:

That was in the good old days and its tightened up a lot now. 

You think so? Look at the Covid and PPE scenarios over the last year; makes you realise that jobs for the boys, unlimited money to the right people and shoddy workmanship are very much alive.

(Sorry for resurrecting an old thread but was looking for one on MOTs and read that... :)  )

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Its just that now I believe the garage have to connect to DVLA electronically while doing the MOT so the vehicle is photographed and readings taken in real time. Also all the equipment required and hoops to jump through to become approved is a big investment so anything to be made from dodgy inspections is far outweighed by the risk of getting disqualified. The garage would have to charge so much for bent MOTs that the owner might as well get the repair work done😁

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I just had the camper MOT`d. Even the Emisions where done conected to the OBDI port, using a remote "wand" which "talks" to the unit. So I guess the whole "Brain" can (could) be interorgated?. Not much room for "dodgey" goings on there. The whole "kit" must be worth thousands?.

Pete

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21 minutes ago, johny said:

Its just that now I believe the garage have to connect to DVLA electronically while doing the MOT so the vehicle is photographed and readings taken in real time. Also all the equipment required and hoops to jump through to become approved is a big investment so anything to be made from dodgy inspections is far outweighed by the risk of getting disqualified. The garage would have to charge so much for bent MOTs that the owner might as well get the repair work done😁

Not sure about that,i recently looked over a 15 year old Transit that someone had bought for their business,it had a fresh MOT.The back axle basically fell off as the whole rear floor and chassis was rotten as ****holes and all the mounting points were gone.

The welder pulled huge amounts of expanding foam and tin plate from it.

S.

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That MOT place wont be around long - as the requirements get tighter the old school places will drop off. Trouble is, to make the investment pay, we're heading for the continental system where theres a lot fewer but larger places offering tests which, if youre out in the sticks, is pretty inconvenient...

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 Bodywork, especially Chassis. Is the real negative of the MOT. It can be bodged (still) quite successfully. The examiner has the hands tied, in that are not allowed to use any type of "pointed" instrument to check condition!. The "toffee" hammer blunt instrument is not adequate, They are`nt (or where`nt) allowed to remove even suspect Coatings. The use of NDT on such small scantillngs is not viable. At least on Boiler plate I had that advantage!, and the right put a "vessel" out of service pending. proper preparation.

Pete

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I still dont think theres many accidents happening because of corrosion thats been missed in the MOT and of course you should have an independent, more exhaustive, inspection if youre worried about it before buying any vehicle....

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I use a classic friendly place, he will not pass it if its not right. He does point out bits that will need doing. My main worry is he is thinking of retirement and his garage will become another 4 houses like the butchers next door did!

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I've just had a nightmare of a Triumph in my garage; I noticed on oiling the trunnions a few weeks back that the track rod ends had perished very badly so offered to replace them. When I took the wheels off yesterday I found the brake pads right back to metal, the front n/s disc warped, the o/s caliper seized so that only one piston moved, and no pedal resistance at all. The pedal just went straight to the floor when pumped and no feel to the brakes at all. The handbrake is pointing to the sky. The young owner says he thought all old cars were like that and being mot-exempt it's not been checked by a tester in the last couple of years. He left the car with me and was driven home so it's now getting calipers, discs, pads and possibly hoses - that will do until I get a look at the rear brakes. How many other cars like this are on the roads with drivers in blissful ignorance and no MOT to check?

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45 minutes ago, PeteH said:

 Bodywork, especially Chassis. Is the real negative of the MOT. It can be bodged (still) quite successfully. The examiner has the hands tied, in that are not allowed to use any type of "pointed" instrument to check condition!. The "toffee" hammer blunt instrument is not adequate, They are`nt (or where`nt) allowed to remove even suspect Coatings. The use of NDT on such small scantillngs is not viable. At least on Boiler plate I had that advantage!, and the right put a "vessel" out of service pending. proper preparation.

Pete

You are right about the stupid "toffee" hammer Pete. If you want a "dodgy" mot go to a Ministry run place. Expanding foam and underseal set rock hard and they are not allowed to touch it. The place i use will refuse to test a car that is covered in fresh schultz type underseal, giving the reason of "to heavily undersealed to test" They got fooled once and never again.

Tony.

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12 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

I've just had a nightmare of a Triumph in my garage; I noticed on oiling the trunnions a few weeks back that the track rod ends had perished very badly so offered to replace them. When I took the wheels off yesterday I found the brake pads right back to metal, the front n/s disc warped, the o/s caliper seized so that only one piston moved, and no pedal resistance at all. The pedal just went straight to the floor when pumped and no feel to the brakes at all. The handbrake is pointing to the sky. The young owner says he thought all old cars were like that and being mot-exempt it's not been checked by a tester in the last couple of years. He left the car with me and was driven home so it's now getting calipers, discs, pads and possibly hoses - that will do until I get a look at the rear brakes. How many other cars like this are on the roads with drivers in blissful ignorance and no MOT to check?

That's a perfect example of why MoT exemption for classics is such a bad idea.

Nigel

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34 minutes ago, Paul H said:

Should the TSSC make an MOT mandatory when valuing our cars for insurance purposes. After all the valuer has little idea as to the state of the chassis

Paul 

Good idea, but playing devil's advocate, maybe not so good for the club's income stream from valuations?

Nigel

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15 minutes ago, Paul H said:

Should the TSSC make an MOT mandatory when valuing our cars for insurance purposes. After all the valuer has little idea as to the state of the chassis

Paul 

Interesting concept. And one of which I would approve. In fact it surprises me that the INSURERS don`t insist on it. I wonder if the ramifications, insurance wise, have been overlooked?.

Take the scenario, the insurer, takes the valuer`s assesment at face value. And provided insurance cover. However should a disaster occur and much damage ensue and/or loss of life, then begins the blame game, the owner is resposible for the condition of the car, yes, and will be charged accordingly (or not) by the CPS. The valuer, puts his hand up and states he was "valuing" not surveying, (Estate agents can and do value, Surveyors confirm condition). The insurer, is still carying liability for compensation either way. The owner will plead "no requirement" for MOT legally. And in his/her (non expert) opinion the vehicle was OK to be used. "Can O Worms". comes to mind.

The MOT is no substitute IMHO for proper "thorough" examination of worthiness, and has it`s known flaws, but is better than nothing. BTW, in my veiw the current system is less focused on the physical condition of the vehicle, which can kill, than the obsesion with "emmissions" which might kill.

Pete

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58 minutes ago, PeteH said:

Take the scenario, the insurer, takes the valuer`s assesment at face value.

When our house was valued before sale / purchase, as a legal necessity we had a man come round, wander about, and provide a survey report for some authority or other - possibly just valuation as Pete has said above.

The report went along the lines of: "the house has running water but I am not a plumber so cannot comment on the condition. The house has mains electricity but I am not an electrician and cannot comment on the condition. The windows are wooden framed but I am not a carpenter so cannot comment on the condition." He charged £400 for that.

However: re cars - it's the driver's responsibility to ensure they are roadworthy, and if he himself cannot do that, then someone else needs to do it - hence the original requirement for the MOT. If you don't do it we'll make you do it.

I've just spent another two hours on that car and have started replacing metal brake pipes.

The scary thing is that I've just run a check on it and it's got an MOT to November 2021. I assumed it had not been tested due to age but the Covid restrictions have given it almost 12 months of MOT extension, the last test being November 2019. How on earth has it got into that state in 18 months?

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9 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

How on earth has it got into that state in 18 months?

Bottom line. I suggest it hasn`t?. But if it was marginal 18 months ago?. It was "let go". And then just used/neglected?.

Pete

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