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Freeing the Rotoflex long bolt.


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I am preparing to do battle with a couple of GT6 Roto uprights for my Nick Jones CV jointed shafts and anticipate at least a couple of obstinate bolts. 

Surely, I thought, someone will have found a simple way to resolve this old problem. I guess not, but does anyone have any good advice (apart from dump them!)?

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There is no easy way I’m afraid 😟 

I assume you mean the bottom, wishbone bolt? Can stick in the vertical link itself, the two bush tubes in the wishbone bushes, or, usually all of them.

Heat, lots of heat (oxy-acetylene preferably, but a mapp torch quite often worked for me) applied to the base of the vertical link where the bolt runs, 6 sided socket and a breaker bar are your best hope. If you can get the bolt moving in the link, but it still won’t knock out, carefully saw through the bushes and bolt taking care not to cut into the link itself. Then you should be able to bash the three parts out separately.

As for the bolt holding the radius arm bracket, in my experience they either come straight out or absolutely no chance. If the bracket and threads are usable, don’t mess with it!

Nick

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Many years ago,one of my radius arm brackets was mullerered at the shock attachment end. I gave up trying to get it out and took it to a local garage. They had to use a gas axe and extreme violence to get it out! Nowadays I wonder if one of those induction coil gizmo's would work. Theyseem to have pretty impressive abilities.

Gav.

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Wouldn`t be the first time I used the Kitchen Oven to introduce heat, and then dropped the offending item into iced water.? Got to be careful though of induced cracking, but with diferential materials it can work.

Jeff had "some difficulty" with a Rear drive shaft in a recent post. I near destroyed one with a 20tonne press lucky to get away with just a light skim of the driving face.

Pete

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8 hours ago, Peter Truman said:

Beautiful drilling job there Ed, did you cross drill the trunnion and fit a grease nipple, also plenty of copper grease on the tie rod bolt, mine are solid!!! 

Thanks, Peter.  No grease nipple, but plenty of anti-seize.

Ed

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Applied as much heat as I feel safe with working alone! No go. So the bolts are cut and drilling will commence as and when I have the time. Hope my drilling goes as well as Ed.h's !!!

The job has inspired a garage clear out, repaired my grinder switch, re- shafted two well loved hammers and decided to unbolt my sheet folder (no more 'special' building now!) to clear bench space.

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There must be hundreds of "penetrating" oils on the market, and no "Which?" report to tell the one to go for.

But I've been impressed  by Innotec DeBlock XS https://www.innotec.eu/oth/en//deblock-oil-xs/p1858 , although not on such long bolts as the Rotoflex ones.

Worth a try?   I heat and spray, cool, repeat and leave.    Could need a long leave with these!

Another 'dodge' is to build a collar around one end of the bolt housing, in clay, putty, BluTac, so that the part can be left with a small pool of the releasing agent above it, to percolate through.

JOhn

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My mentor in my younger days was an uncle who served as an Army mechanic through WW2. He soaked  resistant bolts etc in a recipe that, sadly, went with him to his grave. The only thing that I remember was that it took days!!!

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One popular home brew penetrant is just ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid) mixed with some combination of acetone, kerosene, and/or mineral spirits.  If mild anti rust properties are needed, lanolin is sometimes added.

Ed

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