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Getting close now  to  getting the Spitfire  body back on the chassis.

It’s been a ( very ) long time since I removed it,  but my brief notes suggest that an alloy spacers were on each front outriggers and  2 over the diff cross member like this: kitfrom ANG:224FB15F-1166-42F0-96AD-FB4F25C28C81.thumb.jpeg.a4947a7f96dade653a63549e656b30d3.jpeg

All the bits were in a bad state so I have bought the above kit. 

  But then I see other kits, like Paddocks only have 2 alloy spacers..

From reading various posts, I ‘m still very  unclear if these were always fitted in the way  the diag.  suggests,   or were they  used more on a  “custom built”  basis to accommodate gaps on a “whatever fits best” basis with variation of spacers from one car to another.

I haven’t found any definite guide in any manual or book,

- so I’m seeking advice here, please!

 

 

 

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I think the spacers are generally considered "fit as needed". They may originally have been more consistent but small variations are likely to have developed over time, particularly during a rebuild, and are probably best accommodated with selective spacer use rather than trying to bend the body back to fit the chassis exactly as it originally did.

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to me that shows as you expect  kit A  and kit D look alloy washers 

these are so the body is firmly located to the chassis if all were rubber then some are going to shuffle 

as for rubber pad mounts  always only one rubber pad  and pack wider  wonky spaces with any solid washer 

its a good idea to add a good earth boding wire to link body and chassis at the front and the rear 

pete

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Thanks everyone, that’s very helpful.

The “A” and “D” are alloy,   ie total of 4, Pete.

Hope it goes back as easily as it came off ( the only snag I recall was caused by me forgetting to undo the handbrake cable.The engine crane lifted the whole lot up before I realised what was going on - cable  must be strong!)

 

 

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Just now, Unkel Kunkel said:

Thanks everyone, that’s very helpful.

The “A” and “D” are alloy,   ie total of 4, Pete.

Hope it goes back as easily as it came off ( the only snag I recall was caused by me forgetting to undo the handbrake cable.The engine crane lifted the whole lot up before I realised what was going on - cable  must be strong!)

 

 

Yea i forgot once and when the wheels lifted the penny dropped!

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21 hours ago, ed.h said:

This is a common confusion.  All the suppliers disagree.

It's certainly confused me... :) I read the link but it seems you're doing without any pads at all except where needed? If I've read it correctly - and apologies if I haven't - but it says:  a pair of hard pads at front... ok... a pair of rubber ones at rear... ok... then another pair of rubber ones at rear to fill the gaps. Does this mean you've at least one set of bolts with no pads at all? Won't this allow increased vibration / road noise?

 

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Thanks Ed and Colin -

There does not seem to be any definitive word on this except  putting the alloy ones at the front seems consistent and alloy to the rear, but less so.

The body shell on mine has been fairly well braced whilst it acquired new floors, all sills and lower A posts and inner and outer rear wings, and the chassis has replacement front out-riggers,so  realistically, the body will have altered a bit..

 I think it will be alloy spacers to the front and probably alloy to the rear but I suspect it will be whatever fits best.

Just need to get some freed- up time to do it ..

 

 

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9 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

It's certainly confused me... :) I read the link but it seems you're doing without any pads at all except where needed? If I've read it correctly - and apologies if I haven't - but it says:  a pair of hard pads at front... ok... a pair of rubber ones at rear... ok... then another pair of rubber ones at rear to fill the gaps. Does this mean you've at least one set of bolts with no pads at all? Won't this allow increased vibration / road noise?

 

Colin--

I didn't keep meticulous records beyond what's on my page, but I'm sure that all mounting points had at least one pad.

Ed

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my view  solids washers have no pads they are there to fix the body positions  all others one pad  but pack with anything  solid suitable to shim up any wonky gaps but not multiple pads ...

if all was on pads then the body can shuffle on its chassis  ...not really a good thing you do  need some fixed datum points 

or it will move  of you get a Flintstones effect  Ha !!

Pete

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13 hours ago, ed.h said:

Colin--

I didn't keep meticulous records beyond what's on my page, but I'm sure that all mounting points had at least one pad.

Ed

Thanks Ed; I was just curious to see if some were being left out altogether and how this affected things later on. 

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