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No more ethanol, check this out! Comments


Mathew
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we have had some ethanol in a range of fuels for ages and like the loss of leaded and the millennium clock disasters have never shown to exist

remember Cleveland Discol alcohol petrol of the 50/60s  that worked well

there is more troubles from nasty crap rubber fuel hose than anyone on here found ethanol   dissolving   alloys .  carbs and pipe work    

if it happens then some data will be collected but there is a  chemical reaction from the sceptics 

do we really want members decanting petrol and food dye to solve a myth 

if my carbs dissolve tonight i will alter my own views based  on the experience 

Pete

 

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This process has been around for some time and does work as stated.  I tried it some time back as an experiment using test tubes etc., and it was easy to do.  However, it is very time consuming and a bit messy and would not be a practical option for classics that get used a lot, or those cars which run in any type of long distance events. Maybe okay if you are just driving every now and again to shows, etc.

The current 5% ethanol in fuel is easier to use with appropriate engine adjustments, but the new 10% fuel will be a different matter to deal with.

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More to the point, removing the ethanol from the fuel will have  a big effect on what is left. Is it still the same octane rating? Nope. Better? Worse? What are the other effects?

Remember the fuel we put in our cars is carefully formulated to meet all sorts of specifications. Pulling out one constituent is going to have major side effects. Worse than the ethanol (which is easy enough to deal with)

 

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Anyone who has the intelligence and ingenuity to second guess the trained and experienced engineers at the fuel companies, also has the knause to adjust and adapt their classic car to run on the stuff.

It's a strange lesson from history - those who rioted and smashed machine looms in the early 19th century, were intelligent, ingenious hard-working people who could not adapt to new circumstances, and gave us the name of Luddites.

"Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

John

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I have no option on it either way. Main car is a diesel and the spitfire has a puma modernist engine with fuel injection. The 2500s i am using superunleaded which is used for less than 1000 miles a year. It could be useful information if problems are found with the 10% fuel. I won't be rushing out to decant my fuel for now. If storing fuel, would it be useful to remove the ethanol?

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More useful to add a 'stabilising' preparation to your classic's tank in autumn.    Because they are commonly stored unused for months at a time, these are usually sold for lawn mowers.  

I use Briggs & Stratton "Fuel Fit", readily obtainable at garden centres!

John

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I've only had my 13/60 since the beginning of 2015 so not enough time to state if it is all myth or fact, but I have had no problems running on 98 (E5) nor leaving it in the tank over winter. For a part of the time initially I ran it on 95 (E5).

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I use a local product here in Aus called Fuel Dr, developed for gas station fuel tank protection you double dose to start then every few tank fulls, it absorbs any moisture so protects the tank and also stabilisers the fuel so it doesn’t ‘t go off.

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I have to agree re scientific proof, but I started using it (Fuel Doctor) around 4 years ago after looking down my daughters Mk2 Spit fuel filler nozzle and saw brown (dirt or rust? but not encrusted) which used to be silver (20years ago) on the bottom & sides of the tank, the Vitesse & Sprint tanks are still OK. In fact the Vitesse tank new 5 years ago is still silver. The Vitesse was a NOS Aus CKD small Herald tank, great find, but I do have to carry a 2 gallon plastic spare container.

The company commercially service and protect the garage industries underground petrol tanks so I've always assumed? they know what there doing.

It's relatively expensive normally around $40 for the 1lt size which lasts my 3 cars around a year, but I buy up when the local motor factor have a 25% off weekend. 

Re ethanol in our petrol it's very confusing, in many other states 5% is mandatory, and most Vic producers/suppliers use 5% but the classic car rumor-mill  still says our local BP supplied here in Vic is ethanol free!!! who knows, BP advertise that their top rated 98 octane fuel in 2 tank fills cleans your engine & fuel system up!

One local supplier of cheaper fuel "United" solely sell ethanol laced fuel I think up to 10% but I've never used it in any of my cars even moderns and my classics instinctively race past their service stations!

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My only brush with ethanol was with a 2.2Kw Generator, which largely because of Lockdown had not been used and had fuel left in it. When it was proving a right bitch to start, I contacted the supplier. Their "guy" jumped on the ethanol straight away, it naturally evaporates over time allegedly, that and the fuel stagnating, reduce the ability to ignite fully and properly. Once/If started it will run "satisfactorily". His recomendation was to drain before storage and fill with fresh fuel when required, which I have to say worked for me .

I now do this with the gen-set and the Strimmer and Chain Saw. I thought it worth repeating for anyone who maybe lays up their car over winter. I was told that the ethanol is not stored in the fuel in the refinery but added at the point of delivery tanker filling for that reason?.

As someone said earlier, in the 40`s/50`s we had "Discol" petrol which our Dads ran their cars on, without recorded issues?.

An added thought?. Don`t some Drag Cars run purely on Ethanol?.

Pete

Edited by PeteH
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1 hour ago, PeteH said:

I was told that the ethanol is not stored in the fuel in the refinery but added at the point of delivery tanker filling for that reason?.

Maybe also because at that point they can decide if the petrol is going to be 5% or 10% ethanol?

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